Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
InternetTough

Languages---Which One is More Useful, Tagalog or Visayan?

Recommended Posts

Ba-i

 

 

 

I do not know which PI school you’ve been to or who had taught you at school but Filipino is NOT the national language!!! The national language is PILIPINO!

 

As already been pointed out, Filipino is the general term for the people of the Philippines which is spelt/pronounced interchangeably with Pilipino. PILIPINO, the language as well as English is the medium of instruction in schools and businesses. And PILIPINO, the national language is composed of 80% of the tagalog dialect and the remaining 20% is from the various dialects, majority of which is Cebuano!

 

There is NO Filipino subject in school! But there is a PILIPINO subject in school but only from primary to secondary. And none in Uni unless you are going for teachers training degree. Pilipino as a subject/language is only taught for 1x hour once a week in schools and the rest of the subjects are taught in English. So for Filipinos that live out of the tagalog regions, would only have that 1x hour per week to practice/learn PILIPINO.

 

Its only on the later half of the 80’s that Pilipino language becomes interchangeable with Filipino to reflect the reality that an integral part of the language used in the everday and intellectual discourse of Filipinos are of foreign derivatives.

 

Although, the medium of instructions in schools is Filipino and English, the day to day conversation (outside the tagalog region) is never in English or PILIPINO but whatever is the local dialect. But good schools, in a bid to force their students to speak/practice English, enforced a monetary fine system if the students converse in the local dialect outside the classroom or class session. Therefore, VISAYAN is the widely spoken language as there are more visayan people than tagalogs.

 

(Just a friendly advice – quit while you’re ahead!)

 

 

Well, know the distinction between Filipino as the national language and Pilipino ...If you insist on saying that Filipino is not our national language, as you say so then. I can't change your mind but then you can't change what is there in our constitution. Read the previous post and do your further research. i am here to share my what I learn and its up to the rest to continue what you hold is true. You are all capable of knowing what is right and wrong. The rest is up to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rogersea

 

 

Well, know the distinction between Filipino as the national language and Pilipino ...If you insist on saying that Filipino is not our national language, as you say so then. I can't change your mind but then you can't change what is there in our constitution. Read the previous post and do your further research. i am here to share my what I learn and its up to the rest to continue what you hold is true. You are all capable of knowing what is right and wrong. The rest is up to you.

 

 

I think that this web site succinctly describes the issue http://tagaloglang.com/The-Philippines/Language/filipino-tagalog-pilipino.html

Edited by Rogersea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Davaoeno

 

 

 

I do not know which PI school you’ve been to or who had taught you at school but Filipino is NOT the national language!!! The national language is PILIPINO!

 

As already been pointed out, Filipino is the general term for the people of the Philippines which is spelt/pronounced interchangeably with Pilipino. PILIPINO, the language as well as English is the medium of instruction in schools and businesses. And PILIPINO, the national language is composed of 80% of the tagalog dialect and the remaining 20% is from the various dialects, majority of which is Cebuano!

 

 

 

Its only on the later half of the 80’s that Pilipino language becomes interchangeable with Filipino to reflect the reality that an integral part of the language used in the everday and intellectual discourse of Filipinos are of foreign derivatives.

 

 

Are "Tagalog," "Pilipino" and "Filipino" different languages? No, they are mutually intelligible varieties, and therefore belong to one language. According to the KWF, Filipino is that speech variety spoken in Metro Manila and other urban centers where different ethnic groups meet. It is the most prestigious variety of Tagalog and the language used by the national mass media

 

Its very easy to see why there is a bit of a dispute over whether or not the national language is Filipino or Pilipino [ both of which are virtually the same as tagalog ] because if you read all of the articles, including the ones that I quoted and Rogersea posted a link to you will find that even the articles do not agree on the subject.

I find that many things are like this in the Philippines- not very well understood, and not very well defined , and some of that being because many people here just dont care which interpretation is correct or not [ unlike us westerners who have been called anal because of our desire to do due diligence and to verify our facts ! lol ]

No one is going to win this argument ! [ and as I am now ahead i will quit here !! ]

Edited by davaolife
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mang Kanor

 

English is used as a medium of instruction in every school here in the Philippines same as with Filipino too. If English is widely spoken, expect that it works the same with Filipino. Both English and Filipino are part of the curriculum.

 

 

English is use as a medium of instruction in the Philippines, Filipino is only used during Filipino subject in which I highly doubt that the students really speaks the language on a Filipino subject with fluency. More-so other subjects uses English or local dialect in explaining to the students, no teacher explains it using Tagalog or he'll end up being a laughing stock and that's a FACT.

 

 

 

As you said, you're from Visayas area, do you actually speaks Tagalog with your friends and relatives?

Does your teacher discuss/explains the subject in Tagalog?

 

Ive said it before and ill say it again, people do understand tagalog but have a hard time speaking the language.

Edited by Aldin
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Allen957

My wife speaks both but has told me that Tagalog should be the first choice as it is the national language and Bisaya should be learned later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AB2000

I don't know anything about this cebuano vs tagalog stuff, but I can say is that they are quite impressed here in NE Leyte and Samar when you can speak some Waray :biggrin_01:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
broden

 

 

I have witnessed a cashier use a calculator to add 8 + 4. I could not believe it. What do they actually teach them in those schools

jeez

i hate when you guys do this

don't keep us in suspense

what was the answer???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sjp

 

 

 

I do not know which PI school you’ve been to or who had taught you at school but Filipino is NOT the national language!!! The national language is PILIPINO!

 

As already been pointed out, Filipino is the general term for the people of the Philippines which is spelt/pronounced interchangeably with Pilipino. PILIPINO, the language as well as English is the medium of instruction in schools and businesses. And PILIPINO, the national language is composed of 80% of the tagalog dialect and the remaining 20% is from the various dialects, majority of which is Cebuano!

 

There is NO Filipino subject in school! But there is a PILIPINO subject in school but only from primary to secondary. And none in Uni unless you are going for teachers training degree. Pilipino as a subject/language is only taught for 1x hour once a week in schools and the rest of the subjects are taught in English. So for Filipinos that live out of the tagalog regions, would only have that 1x hour per week to practice/learn PILIPINO.

 

Its only on the later half of the 80’s that Pilipino language becomes interchangeable with Filipino to reflect the reality that an integral part of the language used in the everday and intellectual discourse of Filipinos are of foreign derivatives.

 

Although, the medium of instructions in schools is Filipino and English, the day to day conversation (outside the tagalog region) is never in English or PILIPINO but whatever is the local dialect. But good schools, in a bid to force their students to speak/practice English, enforced a monetary fine system if the students converse in the local dialect outside the classroom or class session. Therefore, VISAYAN is the widely spoken language as there are more visayan people than tagalogs.

 

(Just a friendly advice – quit while you’re ahead!)

 

If English is used most of the time in school, Why do most of the kids in my wifes neighborhood not know how to speak any English, Maybe 1 or 2 words. Just wondering

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Davaoeno

 

If English is used most of the time in school, Why do most of the kids in my wifes neighborhood not know how to speak any English, Maybe 1 or 2 words. Just wondering

 

i think she was referring to studies at university. [ the sentence before the one you highlited says "Uni" ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sjp

jeez

i hate when you guys do this

don't keep us in suspense

what was the answer???

 

 

We don,t know, Her batteries died

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
broden
frustration.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

and as I am now ahead i will quit here !!

I knew that at some point you would get ahead if you kept trying. Congratulations!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul
My wife speaks both but has told me that Tagalog should be the first choice as it is the national language and Bisaya should be learned later.

 

Is your wife from a Tagalog speaking area of the country?

 

 

If English is used most of the time in school, Why do most of the kids in my wifes neighborhood not know how to speak any English, Maybe 1 or 2 words. Just wondering

 

Cebuano / Bisaya speaking Filipinos, those who grow up in a Filipino only home anyway, will learn that language before any other language in this country. Once they enter school, they begin to learn Filipino / Tagalog and English. They feel more comfortable with Cebuano, thus will speak it more than either of the other two languages taught to them. Additionally, they have a fear of making mistakes in English. This causes them to want to speak it less. So, they stick to what is most comfortable to them - Cebuano.

 

Incidentally, they (Filipino teachers) do not necessarily teach English as they should to their students. In many cases, English studies are substandard - from what we would believe to be the norm, anyway.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

 

i think she was referring to studies at university. [ the sentence before the one you highlited says "Uni" ]

Oh dear Ian...you really should have quit while you were ahead. :fighting0029:

 

Athena was talking about elementary through university...most classes are taught in English. The difference in university is that NO classes are taught in Filipino (or Pilipino)...unless the student is studying to become a teacher. Then they continue to have Filipino classes in university. In elementary through high school, the ONLY classes taught in Filipino are the Filipino language classes and the social studies classes. However, OUTSIDE the classroom (and even inside the classroom in most schools) the language of conversations is the local language. SHS Ateneo de Cebu is one of those schools that fine students for using Cebuano on-campus...to reinforce the use of English, Filipino and Mandarin (the third required language at that school).

 

As for why many children of school age don't seem capable of conversing in English, my guess is that they just aren't comfortable in a language they haven't really mastered (remembering that most students do NOT converse in English...even in school). It is much different listening to a language in class than it is trying to speak it without making mistakes. My wife estimates that about 30% of the population NEVER becomes comfortable enough to converse in English...about the same percentage that can't tell time on a clock with hands. Maybe some people live in neighborhoods where the rate is much higher.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

In many cases, English studies are substandard - from what we would believe to be the norm, anyway.

My wife jumped all over me for criticizing the English spoken here. She said, "You have your English, and we have our English. Just because there are differences doesn't make one right and the other wrong." She's right, of course. There are MANY dialects of English...and many are barely intelligible to other English speakers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Sailfish Bay Fishing Charters

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..