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Languages---Which One is More Useful, Tagalog or Visayan?

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Ba-i

In my business dealings in Mindanao it was a bit of an event for my Bisayan speaking staff to communicate with Luzon visitors. Sometimes my staff did it on purpose as they got pissed being told to speak Tagalog,,,not Filipino by guys form Manila!! My staff preferred English as a second language and would at times to do this with Luzon visitors I am sure just for the mischief of it. The poorer educated ones , sadly too many do not speak or understand Tagalog or English they are only comfortable in local dialect, TV channels are in local dialect so need for Tagalog etc

 

 

Thats the problem there if you ask them to speak in Tagalog coz Tagalog is a dialect which is for the people in Manila and its nearby places. They will take offence of it atleast for some who is really is patronize their own native language :D This is the reason why Filipino is considered as the National language here in the Philippines and not tagalog.

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Davaoeno

 

 

Thats the problem there if you ask them to speak in Tagalog coz Tagalog is a dialect which is for the people in Manila and its nearby places. They will take offence of it atleast for some who is really is patronize their own native language :D This is the reason why Filipino is considered as the National language here in the Philippines and not tagalog.

 

now you are confusing me !! lol

 

 

Wikepedia: Filipino is a prestige register of the Tagalog language and the name under which Tagalog is designated the national language and one of two official languages of the Philippines, the other being English.[4] Tagalog is the first language of a third of the population of the Philippines. It is centered around Manila but is known almost universally throughout the country.[5]

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Ba-i

I believe English is the most widely spoken language in the Philippines. Regardless of which language is spoken in your area, English is spoken by many of the people too. English is taught in elementry and high school and the books are in English except for a couple which are in Filipino.

 

English is used as a medium of instruction in every school here in the Philippines same as with Filipino too. If English is widely spoken, expect that it works the same with Filipino. Both English and Filipino are part of the curriculum.

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Ba-i

 

now you are confusing me !! lol

 

 

Wikepedia: Filipino is a prestige register of the Tagalog language and the name under which Tagalog is designated the national language and one of two official languages of the Philippines, the other being English.[4] Tagalog is the first language of a third of the population of the Philippines. It is centered around Manila but is known almost universally throughout the country.[5]

 

 

Don't be confused. Before our national language was tagalog, but it was changed and Filipino is now our national language. You should read further inthat source you got for you to understand :D

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Ba-i

The official language of the Philippines is Filipino. Sound confusing why not Tagalog when it sounded like one. Well, Filipino language acknowledge and embrace the existence of and preference for many English- and Spanish-derived words. "Western" letters such as f, j, c, x and z — sounds of which were not indigenous to the islands before the arrival of the Spaniards and the Americans — were included in the official Filipino alphabet. As you can see, the pure Tagalog language if I am not mistaken doesn't have this letters in it.Tagalog is a regional dialect of the which is spoken by people in Manila and its nearby provinces.

 

Citizens of the Philippines uses different Vernacular, and in hope of having one common language which people will be able to communicate well, Filipino was made is the National language and not Tagalog because of objections raised by representatives from other parts of the country where Tagalog was not spoken. It merely stated that a national language acceptable to the entire populace (and ideally incorporating elements from the diverse languages spoken throughout the islands) would be a future goal. Hence Filipino came about as the National language.

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Davaoeno

 

 

Don't be confused. Before our national language was tagalog, but it was changed and Filipino is now our national language. You should read further inthat source you got for you to understand :D

 

Reading further into the same source is says :

 

 

Are "Tagalog," "Pilipino" and "Filipino" different languages? No, they are mutually intelligible varieties, and therefore belong to one language. According to the KWF, Filipino is that speech variety spoken in Metro Manila and other urban centers where different ethnic groups meet. It is the most prestigious variety of Tagalog and the language used by the national mass media

 

The article - in its whole- makes it very clear that Tagalog and Filipino are the same language !! So to say that the national language changed from tagalog to filipino is to misrepresent things in my opinion- only the name has been changed- NOT the language

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SkyMan

Ba-i, you're the only Cebuano I've heard say that Filipino and Tagolog aren't the same. I've never heard a Tagolog spaeaker say they spoke Filipino either. Filipino is a just a marketing scheme of the gov't. By calling Tagolog Filipino, the gov't is trying to advertise to the world that all Filipinos speak Filipino. Saying Tagolog is one of the Official National Languages doesn't really mean anything. People are going to speak what they want. If the US declared English as the Official National Language, you wouldn't see droves of Mexicans running out to learn English. We would save tons of money from not having to have gov't forms and laws translated into other languages but that's about it.

 

As for Tagolog being taught in schools I suppose that's true but they also teach math in schools. Ever seen a cashier able to do anything without a calculator? For example, suppose your bill comes to p70. Give them a p100 and p20 in coins to get rid of them. 99 times out of 100 they will hand you the coins right back (with a "you're an idiot" look) and then after using a calculator to subtract 70 from 100, they will give you some combination of p30 which you then have to return with the original p20 in order to get a p50 note finally reducing your coinage. If you don't use something you lose it and a couple years after school, it's quite understandable the ability/desire to use Tagolog has diminished substantially by non-Tagolog speakers.

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sjp
i beg to disagree on you Ba-i, tagalog is not the widely spoken language in the Philippines, people do understand but can't speak the dialect very well.

 

How would you compare Tagalog to English for most Filipinos. If I were to speak in Tagalog to them ( in my broken and barely and freshly learned Tagalog ) would it be better than speaking to them in English. As of now English is not working out to well for me as most Filipinos do not understand me. I would love to learn Bisayan but the tools are not there like there is for Tagalog ( http://www.byki.com/ ). My wife told me that Visayan would be ideal for me to learn but Tagalog would be ok.

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sjp

Ba-i, you're the only Cebuano I've heard say that Filipino and Tagolog aren't the same. I've never heard a Tagolog spaeaker say they spoke Filipino either. Filipino is a just a marketing scheme of the gov't. By calling Tagolog Filipino, the gov't is trying to advertise to the world that all Filipinos speak Filipino. Saying Tagolog is one of the Official National Languages doesn't really mean anything. People are going to speak what they want. If the US declared English as the Official National Language, you wouldn't see droves of Mexicans running out to learn English. We would save tons of money from not having to have gov't forms and laws translated into other languages but that's about it.

 

As for Tagolog being taught in schools I suppose that's true but they also teach math in schools. Ever seen a cashier able to do anything without a calculator? For example, suppose your bill comes to p70. Give them a p100 and p20 in coins to get rid of them. 99 times out of 100 they will hand you the coins right back (with a "you're an idiot" look) and then after using a calculator to subtract 70 from 100, they will give you some combination of p30 which you then have to return with the original p20 in order to get a p50 note finally reducing your coinage. If you don't use something you lose it and a couple years after school, it's quite understandable the ability/desire to use Tagolog has diminished substantially by non-Tagolog speakers.

 

 

I have witnessed a cashier use a calculator to add 8 + 4. I could not believe it. What do they actually teach them in those schools

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SkyMan

 

 

I have witnessed a cashier use a calculator to add 8 + 4. I could not believe it. What do they actually teach them in those schools

The formula for a board foot calculation is to multiply the board dimensions (inXinXft) X the bf price X the number of pieces and then divide by 12. I ordered 5. 1X1X10ft pieces and the girl multiplied 1 X 1 X 10, etc.

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Ba-i

 

Reading further into the same source is says :

 

 

Are "Tagalog," "Pilipino" and "Filipino" different languages? No, they are mutually intelligible varieties, and therefore belong to one language. According to the KWF, Filipino is that speech variety spoken in Metro Manila and other urban centers where different ethnic groups meet. It is the most prestigious variety of Tagalog and the language used by the national mass media

 

The article - in its whole- makes it very clear that Tagalog and Filipino are the same language !! So to say that the national language changed from tagalog to filipino is to misrepresent things in my opinion- only the name has been changed- NOT the language

 

 

I am a Filipino right? and we are aware of what our national symbolism is :biggrin_01: Plus, Filipinos saying Tagalog as our national language as they say is something people got used to..this maybe funny but it is also like referring to tricycles here...even if it may be Yamaha people will say. " We will have to ride a honda all the way to the market." or buying toothpaste - yet they would always think toothpaste=colgate :D

 

If you want to know more about the difference between Tagalog and Filipino. In my previous post I already explained. Pure Tagalog has aletter in the alphabeth like ( abkdeghelmnngoprstuwy) they prnounce it as (b=ba : k=ka ) while in the Filipino language this already acknowledge and embrace the existence of and preference for many English- and Spanish-derived words. "Western" letters such as f, j, c, x and z.

Edited by Ba-i

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Ba-i

 

 

I have witnessed a cashier use a calculator to add 8 + 4. I could not believe it. What do they actually teach them in those schools

 

 

lmao = this is exactly what I said before. The kind of education nowadays had been deteriorating. College degree holders here are not pretty much well verse with English and some even with basic math / calculations. I always blame it to the teachers being hired to teach. And the Education which had become highly commercialized. As I observed, the center of the educative process isn't anymore with the learner bu with the books publishers and school can sell. Education is more about income gained and salary oriented. Teachers are not a highly competitive and well trained as they should be.

Edited by Ba-i
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Ba-i

In the 1987 Constitution, Article XIV section 6 states that " the National language of the Philippines is Filipino."

 

The Constitution also provides that subjects to provision of law as the congress may deem appropriate, the Government shall take steps to initiate and sustain the use of Filipino as a medium of official communication and as a language of instruction in educational system.

 

Section 7. For purposes of communication and instruction, the offical language of the Philippines are Filipino and, until otherwise provided by law, English.

 

The regional language are the auxiliary official language in the region and shall serve as auxilliary media of instruction.

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ArieBombarie

 

How would you compare Tagalog to English for most Filipinos. If I were to speak in Tagalog to them ( in my broken and barely and freshly learned Tagalog ) would it be better than speaking to them in English. As of now English is not working out to well for me as most Filipinos do not understand me. I would love to learn Bisayan but the tools are not there like there is for Tagalog ( http://www.byki.com/ ). My wife told me that Visayan would be ideal for me to learn but Tagalog would be ok.

yeah but ask some extra questions, we moved the family from Quezon to Cebu City and you can forget that tricycle drivers, sari sari store owners, maids, store clerks, wet market merchants, understand Filipino well enough to converse with you (if they understand it at all), Cebuano's who do speak filipino on a decent level, speak good english and often better english than filipino, that sort of takes the sense out of learning a local language. I understand that in other parts like Leyte the level of tagalog is better but if you go live in Cebu it makes little sense to me, even they now learn cebuano since if you want to do the daily life stuff that is the language you need there.

Edited by ArieBombarie
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Athena

 

 

Filipino is widely spoken since it is our National language. And Filipino (subject) is part of our curriculum from pre-school up to the tertiary. And since Filipino is Tagalog-based, it is therefore right to state that from Luzon to Mindanao, unless they are out of school youth or people who had not went to school would understand Tagalog. Visayan language is not that widely spoken.

 

 

 

I do not know which PI school you’ve been to or who had taught you at school but Filipino is NOT the national language!!! The national language is PILIPINO!

 

As already been pointed out, Filipino is the general term for the people of the Philippines which is spelt/pronounced interchangeably with Pilipino. PILIPINO, the language as well as English is the medium of instruction in schools and businesses. And PILIPINO, the national language is composed of 80% of the tagalog dialect and the remaining 20% is from the various dialects, majority of which is Cebuano!

 

There is NO Filipino subject in school! But there is a PILIPINO subject in school but only from primary to secondary. And none in Uni unless you are going for teachers training degree. Pilipino as a subject/language is only taught for 1x hour once a week in schools and the rest of the subjects are taught in English. So for Filipinos that live out of the tagalog regions, would only have that 1x hour per week to practice/learn PILIPINO.

 

Its only on the later half of the 80’s that Pilipino language becomes interchangeable with Filipino to reflect the reality that an integral part of the language used in the everday and intellectual discourse of Filipinos are of foreign derivatives.

 

Although, the medium of instructions in schools is Filipino and English, the day to day conversation (outside the tagalog region) is never in English or PILIPINO but whatever is the local dialect. But good schools, in a bid to force their students to speak/practice English, enforced a monetary fine system if the students converse in the local dialect outside the classroom or class session. Therefore, VISAYAN is the widely spoken language as there are more visayan people than tagalogs.

 

(Just a friendly advice – quit while you’re ahead!)

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