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Gender Words Translator of Foreigners in the Philippines


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Some foreigners visiting or living in the Philippines have been lead to believe that the local languages of Cebuano and Tagalog do not have gender words. This is not true. There are many words in Cebuano and Tagalog which are gender specific. And, like in English there are words which can be either gender.

 

To me, it wouldn't seem practical to have a language that doesn't have words which refer to a male or female. Can you imagine this happening? You heard that your mother just had a baby so you call to ask her about the baby. "Hi mom, how are ? I'm fine. What does your baby have between it's legs?" Remember, there are no words for boy or girl. What kind of language would that be?

 

Well, I knew that couldn't be true so with the assistance of a Filipina, I made a gender words list that foreigners can use when trying to learn the local languages. I also attched a link to the list where you can translate words for yourself.

Gender Words Translated.docx

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I can't speak for anyone else, but I have never said that, nor would I.

 

My point, in your previous thread, was to point out that, just because there is a word, "Siya", which means he / she / it, doesn't mean we should be correcting Filipinos when they make an "error". In our minds, yes, they may be. However, in theirs, they are not. They are simply picking the word closest to what comes to mind for them. So, it is correct, for them.

 

Not everything between two different languages always translates perfectly.

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Why would someone say that theres no genders in Filipino language?

 

That's a good question, but if you read the thread, "Teach Filipinos how to use the correct Gender Words" you will know it's true. Maybe one of the people who came to that conclusion will be able to tell us after they study the languages a little more.

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I can't speak for anyone else, but I have never said that, nor would I.

 

My point, in your previous thread, was to point out that, just because there is a word, "Siya", which means he / she / it, doesn't mean we should be correcting Filipinos when they make an "error". In our minds, yes, they may be. However, in theirs, they are not. They are simply picking the word closest to what comes to mind for them. So, it is correct, for them.

 

Not everything between two different languages always translates perfectly.

 

Reading back through the posts in my last thread, I know you didn't say Cebuano or Tagalog don't have gender words, but a few people did. Also, this is not the first time I have read this on the forum. I really would like to know where this belief comes from.

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A Filipina once said to me, "My uncle, she just had a baby".

 

Even I can understand what was meant, so why do some people have a problem with such useage?

It may not be correct English grammer, but the prime object if speach is to convey a message, and proived that is done, it has achieved what was intended.

 

Apart from that, I suspect that few of us here are so proficient in English that we never make mistakes.

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broden

i've never ever in my life heard my wife get any gender words wrong except him/her and he/she

now days only in conversation and pretty rarely and usually only when she is speaking to me. never in her life in writing.

 

then again my wife has been very proficient in English since she was a very small child , the most proficient in her entire family

Edited by broden
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Stranded Shipscook

Nice effort with the list, certainly appreciated, but when one speaks of gender neutrality he/she means that they do not use the gender attributes as we know in our Latin based languages.

In your list you state words for Boy Girl and the like, but still there isn't a gender defined.

 

Even English changed over the centuries and simplified.

 

Native language mixed with Latin = "Germish"

 

Germish mixed with Celtish = "English"

 

from there on both languages continued to developed on their own and became todays form (still in formation though, as one see the developing of the US language)

however, Englsih 'lost" their capability to define a correct gender to the words... poor guys, you will never be able to define whether an object such as a table is male, female or neutral. (Der Tisch - male of course, in English its just the table, huhuhu)

 

sorry for the ironic excursion, but the Filipino languages are an Australonesian language, one can hardly expect that they developed similar.

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A Filipina once said to me, "My uncle, she just had a baby".

 

Even I can understand what was meant, so why do some people have a problem with such useage?

It may not be correct English grammer, but the prime object if speach is to convey a message, and proived that is done, it has achieved what was intended.

 

Apart from that, I suspect that few of us here are so proficient in English that we never make mistakes.

 

It's funny when they say things like that. Usually I know what they mean but sometimes I have to ask one or more questions to determine who they are talking about.

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i've never ever in my life heard my wife get any gender words wrong except him/her and he/she

now days only in conversation and pretty rarely and usually only when she is speaking to me. never in her life in writing.

 

then again my wife has been very proficient in English since she was a very small child , the most proficient in her entire family

 

My first Filipino wife, Grace, of 3 years said he and she wrong 100% of the time and that's why I started this thread. I still don't understand why or how she did it. I was hoping to get some understanding from the posts here.

 

My fiancee, Manilyn, always uses he and she correctly. Grace and Manilyn both graduated high school in Mindanao, so what is the difference. Is it their intelligence level? Well, Manilyn is one of the most intelligent people I know and I guess Grace is about average.

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broden

i know some pretty smart people who misspeak, i don't mean only filipinos. i think some people just have the gift of gab more than others

 

and i think some people get inwardly nervous about making mistakes and kind of sabotage themselves and once a mistake is made they sometimes build on it

 

kind of like throwing errors in baseball, can't tel you how many time i've seen someone over throw a ball then under throw trying to correct but over correcting .. then back and forth over and under till they shake the funk they are in

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Nice effort with the list, certainly appreciated, but when one speaks of gender neutrality he/she means that they do not use the gender attributes as we know in our Latin based languages.

In your list you state words for Boy Girl and the like, but still there isn't a gender defined.

 

Even English changed over the centuries and simplified.

 

Native language mixed with Latin = "Germish"

 

Germish mixed with Celtish = "English"

 

from there on both languages continued to developed on their own and became todays form (still in formation though, as one see the developing of the US language)

however, Englsih 'lost" their capability to define a correct gender to the words... poor guys, you will never be able to define whether an object such as a table is male, female or neutral. (Der Tisch - male of course, in English its just the table, huhuhu)

 

sorry for the ironic excursion, but the Filipino languages are an Australonesian language, one can hardly expect that they developed similar.

 

I'm glad at least one person appreciates the effort it took to make the list. I didn't use the on line translator to make the list because it can be confusing and not necessarily the correct word being used today. Manilyn can read, write, and speak all of the languages well so she wrote them on paper and then I typed it. We had to edit it several times to remove all of the spelling errors and to add more words. It took about to hours to complete.

 

Giving an object such as a table a gender name doesn't make any sense to me. OK so a table is a male. Does it have a penis or any other attribute that a man has? In English a table is it. It is used for an object and it's not used for a person, a animal, fish, bird, or any thing that lives.

 

In America, there are a few objects that are considered to be male or female but it's not in their name anymore. Maybe their gender survived from long ago. I can't remember many of them right now but I believe a ship is female. Some Harley Davidson owners, Bikers, give their bike a female name. I named mine Bitch one time when it wouldn't start. hehehe

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Stranded Shipscook

 

My first Filipino wife, Grace, of 3 years said he and she wrong 100% of the time and that's why I started this thread. I still don't understand why or how she did it. I was hoping to get some understanding from the posts here.

 

My fiancee, Manilyn, always uses he and she correctly. Grace and Manilyn both graduated high school in Mindanao, so what is the difference. Is it their intelligence level? Well, Manilyn is one of the most intelligent people I know and I guess Grace is about average.

Oh i see.

Well the difference is the trained capability of your first wife. She just had a better "linguistic" one.

Or she trained very particular on this gender subject.

Secondly it could be possible that she was "thinking" in English, and you current wife is still in the "translating" process.

 

It is a fantastic discovery i made myself actually. I think in a secondary language and lost the capability (temporary) to express myself correctly in my mother tongue. At least in instant response.

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i know some pretty smart people who misspeak, i don't mean only filipinos. i think some people just have the gift of gab more than others and i think some people get inwardly nervous about making mistakes and kind of sabotage themselves and once a mistake is made they sometimes build on it kind of like throwing errors in baseball, can't tel you how many time i've seen someone over throw a ball then under throw trying to correct but over correcting .. then back and forth over and under till they shake the funk they are in

 

You may be right. What you said does make sense.

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Oh i see. Well the difference is the trained capability of your first wife. She just had a better "linguistic" one. Or she trained very particular on this gender subject. Secondly it could be possible that she was "thinking" in English, and you current wife is still in the "translating" process. It is a fantastic discovery i made myself actually. I think in a secondary language and lost the capability (temporary) to express myself correctly in my mother tongue. At least in instant response.

 

I married a Vietnamese in 1972 and have been either married to or around Asians since then, so I learned what you are saying long ago. The language someone thinks in is the one they can speak the best. I use to ask my wife and a few others that question, but of course with a woman, if you ask her what language were you thinking in, she might say I wasn't thinking, haha

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