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Easyrider

Teach Filipinos how to use the correct Gender Words.

  

52 members have voted

  1. 1. Does your girlfriend or wife use the correct gender words?

    • Yes, she is always correct.
      5
    • Yes, she gets it right more than half the time.
      17
    • Yes, she gets it right about half of the time.
      10
    • Yes, she gets it right sometimes.
      15
    • Yes, she gets it right but not very often.
      3
    • No, she always uses the wrong word.
      2


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Paul

Without going through and reading every post in this thread, I am going to comment.

 

We (native English speakers) look at it as though it is an error. However, what you are not taking into consideration here is, it really isn't incorrect for Filipinos when they speak and say he or she, when they should (according to us) be saying the opposite.

 

In Cebuano, he, she, and it are all covered by one word - siya. Plural of that would be sila. I could speak in Cebuano and ask, "Asa siya?" I would be asking, "Where is he/she/it?" None would be incorrect.

 

So, in my opinion, we should not be correcting Filipinos. They are simply using the first word that comes to mind, as they are translating from Cebuano to English.

Edited by Admin
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Steve

 

So, in my opinion, we should not be correcting Filipinos. They are simply using the first word that comes to mind, as they are translating from Cebuano to English.

 

 

Well put! :stick_poke:

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Paul

Besides, we are in their country, their province, and their city. What the hell are we doing speaking English? Each of us should be making more of an effort to learn Cebuano. (The primary reason I stopped trying to learn Tagalog was, most Filipinos in the Visayas and Mindanao do not, by default, speak Tagalog. They speak Cebuano, or Bisaya, a dialect of Cebuano.)

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Easyrider

English is one of two official languages taught in school from the first year of elementary school thru high school. And, it's taught in college for those who can afford to go to college. The other official language, Tagalog, and the other unofficial languages not having gender pronouns shouldn't prevent someone from learning to speak another language correctly after studding it for 10 years in school and from reading it on the Internet, in books and on most documents in the Philippines.

 

Are some of the posters here implying that Filipinos are not capable of learning something different? Isn't that an insult to their intelligence? I believe they can learn something different or new to them and that's why I made the word list with pictures. A small child in the Philippines (see David Spicer's post) can learn the difference between he and she so why can't an adult?

 

Using he or she correctly in conversations really doesn't matter if you keep repeating the person or people's names, but who ever does that? Probably no one.

 

In the 1980's I heard a man speaking about teaching people correctly. He said it's 10 times harder to learn something correctly after you have learned it wrong, and that's what I believe is happening in the Philippines. I believe most of the fault lies with the teachers here.

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Paul
English is one of two official languages taught in school from the first year of elementary school thru high school. And, it's taught in college for those who can afford to go to college. The other official language, Tagalog, and the other unofficial languages not having gender pronouns shouldn't prevent someone from learning to speak another language correctly after studding it for 10 years in school and from reading it on the Internet, in books and on most documents in the Philippines.

 

Are some of the posters here implying that Filipinos are not capable of learning something different? Isn't that an insult to their intelligence? I believe they can learn something different or new to them and that's why I made the word list with pictures. A small child in the Philippines (see David Spicer's post) can learn the difference between he and she so why can't an adult?

 

Using he or she correctly in conversations really doesn't matter if you keep repeating the person or people's names, but who ever does that? Probably no one.

 

In the 1980's I heard a man speaking about teaching people correctly. He said it's 10 times harder to learn something correctly after you have learned it wrong, and that's what I believe is happening in the Philippines. I believe most of the fault lies with the teachers here.

 

No, well, I don't mean anything of the sort when I make the statements I do.

 

What I mean is, we are in their country, not the other way around. By us being here, we should not expect them to change for us, regardless of what we think is correct. We, on the other hand, should be changing, adjusting to the way things are here.

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Easyrider

I agree with you Paul. I don't expect anyone to change for me and saying she instead on he doen't bother me. This week I just laughed when a Filipina said I'm a good woman. I just believe they could communicate more effectively in English if they learn the difference between a male and a female.

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KennyF

When I was courting my Thai wife she quizzed me about my family.

I told her "I have a big brother".

"Is your big brother a boy or a girl" she asked.

 

KonGC

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broden

error or not it's still funny

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broden

When I was courting my Thai wife she quizzed me about my family.

I told her "I have a big brother".

"Is your big brother a boy or a girl" she asked.

 

KonGC

so you're just going to keep us all in suspense ?

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A_Simple_Man

When I was courting my Thai wife she quizzed me about my family.

I told her "I have a big brother".

"Is your big brother a boy or a girl" she asked.

 

KonGC

 

When I was courting my Thai wife she quizzed me about my family.

I told her "I have a big brother".

"Is your big brother a boy or a girl" she asked.

 

KonGC

When I was courting my Canadian wife I quizzed her about her family.

She told me "I have a big brother"/

Shortly after we married her big brother BECAME her big sister.

 

True story. No wonder some people get their genders confused.

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Mandingo

My wife grew up in the mountains, she had some English is school but not much. She learned most of what she knows from the people around her that didn't speak very good English like her sisters and other family members, although if you ask them they are excellent. I don't have any problems with her English and understand 99% of what she says but she is very shy about her abilities in speaking it with other people.

 

Since arriving in the States it hasn't gotten any better for her. Most of her coworkers, supervisors, people at the stores, banks and so on here are Filipinos so she doesn't have to speak English very often, only with me at home. I don't always want to be correcting her and make her feel bad but on the other hand I want her to be able to feel confident in speaking English since she is going to here here a long time. I guess I will try to get her to take some classes at the local community college.

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Easyrider

Without going through and reading every post in this thread, I am going to comment.

 

We (native English speakers) look at it as though it is an error. However, what you are not taking into consideration here is, it really isn't incorrect for Filipinos when they speak and say he or she, when they should (according to us) be saying the opposite.

 

In Cebuano, he, she, and it are all covered by one word - siya. Plural of that would be sila. I could speak in Cebuano and ask, "Asa siya?" I would be asking, "Where is he/she/it?" None would be incorrect.

 

So, in my opinion, we should not be correcting Filipinos. They are simply using the first word that comes to mind, as they are translating from Cebuano to English.

 

You are correct in your statement above because siya is plural, it means male or female, but there are several words which are gender specific. (See the attached list.)

Gender Words Translated.docx

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Paul
You are correct in your statement above because siya is plural, it means male or female, but there are several words which are gender specific. (See the attached list.)

 

No. siya is singular, meaning (one) he, she, or it. Sila, however, is plural.

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Easyrider

Consider that the Visayan dialect knows no genders, so the concept is something alien to the natives; I do not know about Tagalog.

 

The Visayan dialect does have gender words. How could they communicate effectively without them?

Gender Words Translated.docx

Edited by Easyrider

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Easyrider

Its the same in Tagalog. Personally, I don't correct my wife when she makes pronoun errors and don't intend to start. She speaks 3 languages and I speak 1. That makes her the linguist in the family, not me.

 

If you mean Tagalog doesn't have gender words, you are wrong. Who taught you that? And, did you try using a language translator?

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