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the.lone.gunman

language translator

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the.lone.gunman

I need a language translator app., or something....... eg: You speak Visayan into my phone or recorder and it translates it into English for me. Does anyone have any info? Phuck off in advance if you're going to tell me to just learn the language.

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mpt1947

I have seen them for Tagalog, but not for Visayan

 

I would tell you to learn the language, but I think it is near impossible I listen but it often sounds like the same word is never repeated twice

 

I have picked up the greetings and a few other phrases but it will be a miracle if I can converse in the next couple of years or if forever

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Foxy Rob

Better to learn the language!!! :rofl:

AH, Ok I'll PHUCK off. :closedeyes:

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I haven't seen such a translator. I would just like to see Rosetta Stone come out with Bisayan. Unfortunately, they have no plans to do so. Unfortunately, since Bisayan isn't a national language (I know it's spoken by more people than Tagalog), it isn't likely to get the attention of the companies that do this sort of thing.

 

The problem with this approach, though, is that the grammar of Bisayan is so different from English, you wouldn't likely understand what was being said anyway. It would come out as a jumble of words that wouldn't make any sense to the listener.

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the.lone.gunman

I haven't seen such a translator. I would just like to see Rosetta Stone come out with Bisayan. Unfortunately, they have no plans to do so. Unfortunately, since Bisayan isn't a national language (I know it's spoken by more people than Tagalog), it isn't likely to get the attention of the companies that do this sort of thing.

 

The problem with this approach, though, is that the grammar of Bisayan is so different from English, you wouldn't likely understand what was being said anyway. It would come out as a jumble of words that wouldn't make any sense to the listener.

Yah, I sorta figured that out too. But i thought if the translation came as written text on screen maybe I could get a rough idea of what is being said. My gf has been teaching me and i know a few words and phrases but not enough to understand and participate in a conversation in Visayan.

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Yah, I sorta figured that out too. But i thought if the translation came as written text on screen maybe I could get a rough idea of what is being said. My gf has been teaching me and i know a few words and phrases but not enough to understand and participate in a conversation in Visayan.

Yeah, I know what you mean. I've been here a couple of years and I'm still in the "phrases" phase. My wife tells me the Bisayan word if I ask for a translation, and I even took some lessons from Angie (that got cut off when i had to return to the US for an emergency), but I still can't put sentences together (even with Angie's grammar lessons). My MIL told me not to worry. She says our baby will teach me Bisayan.

 

Right now, if I can't understand somebody on the phone (whether they are speaking in English or Bisayan), I just give the phone to my wife. Unfortunately, with the heavy accent here (and so many badly mispronounced words), I have a hard time making sense of what callers are saying...even if they think they are speaking ENGLISH.

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Wombat No More

I have seen them for Tagalog, but not for Visayan

 

I would tell you to learn the language, but I think it is near impossible I listen but it often sounds like the same word is never repeated twice

 

I have picked up the greetings and a few other phrases but it will be a miracle if I can converse in the next couple of years or if forever

 

I've been here 8 years and I'm still buggered mate!

 

I'm always asked around the place if I speak Visayan and I reply "ONLY THE IMPORTANT WORDS... like if I'm out of drink, HARUTNA... if I'm driving I need to yell out the window now and then, BUANG or PISTI or BAHU OTOT... stuff like that!" (and don't hold me on the spelling you mugs.

 

I prefer to speak the only decent language in the world... AUSTRALIAN post-6386-0-18606500-1314876667_thumb.gif

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myk101

I need a language translator app., or something....... eg: You speak Visayan into my phone or recorder and it translates it into English for me. Does anyone have any info? Phuck off in advance if you're going to tell me to just learn the language.

 

I've been using a couple of some foreign language translator apps awhile back but only national language no Cebuano dialect. (I speak Bisaya, I'm Cebuano) =) I will surely post it here if I bump into one.

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Stranded Shipscook

Here is one for DOS/WINDOWS "Babylon9"

 

it doesn't talk, but if you got a cheap ipad or similar u can carry it around.

 

error- i tried to upload the setup.exe, but it isn't allowed. ok- ( i could email it to anybody, just Pm me )

 

you can online translate at the same website

 

http://translation.babylon.com/visayan/to-english/

 

or download the setup.exe there as well.

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m60man

Its not easy to understand and even harder to speak. I can relate to vendors and clerks in their basic language. I do however understand 50% or better of what is being said. That works to my advantage and keeps people honest around me. Once they know that I understand a lot of what they are saying they miraculously speak English! Go figure........I find it to be a mixture of Tagalog, Spanish and English. The sentence structure is very heavy on the Spanish language, the vowels, a,e,i,o,u are totally sounded different in most cases. For instance if we as Americans see a sign that says, Ihaw Ihaw we would pronounce it that way....I haw, I haw........not here, its E How, E how. That was my first lesson about vowels after the laughter died down! But like most things here that is not always the rule, take Talisay. I see it as Ta-li- say.....wrong......its Ta-lis- ay, the second "a" is pronounced as an "i" as in ay. Again think spanish and the breaks are different. But it gets worse.......some things can not be translated into English, they just do not have the words to express what we ask into English. I learn more from TV then I do from the locals. I hear words repeated and figure out what they are talking about, than I verify it with my wife. She can speak good English but when I ask her how to say something in her language she may have problems with it. There are just some things that they can not translate or do not have the words to do it justice. If you listen carefully to their language you will start to hear a lot of repetition, such as balik balik.....which can mean to repeat or I will be back, depending on the situation. I would have to say the language as a whole is a very basic form of communication that leaves a lot to be desired when it comes to communicating emotions and directions. Maybe that is why you can understand more about whats being conveyed by watching their body language, eyebrows and corners of their mouths. That will usually tell you more then whats coming out of their mouth. :twocents:

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m3x

anybody knows the meany of this ? online translators dont know it

 

"Syempre y time maglangat langay dri"

 

Thanks.

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USMC-Retired
"Syempre y time maglangat langay dri"

 

There is no time to be slow here.

 

There is no time to waste here

 

There is no time to be a fool here

 

There is no time to dily daly here.

 

 

 

Though it is missing something to understand context

 

Also

maglangat = maglangay Misspelled

Edited by Norseman

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questsea73

I think one will find with all the SouthEast Asian languages that they are basic-needs type languages, and somewhat primitive, with repetition used to emphasize something. Also no way to express quite a few things from the modern world, other than borrowing the exact word/phrase from the language that originated it. Also very inexact languages which give emphasis to social standing and to prevent giving offense to anyone. Tomorrow might be literally expressed as the day after today. Many examples.

 

I have heard considerable Tagalog/illicano/Visayan spoken and I must say it is the most alien language I have heard with me being unable to pick up anything substantial from individuals speech unless a bit of Taglish makes its appearance. When I arrive later this year I ,at my age, am not even trying other than key words and key phrases for purchase/taxi, etc.

 

Ken

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