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Aaron

Short English lesson

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Aaron

Here are two words that so many people don't know how to spell or use correctly:

 

lose -it's a verb, indicating action -opposite of win or gain. You often see "loose" written instead. Wrong; loose is an adjective; opposite of tight. So, you cannot "loose" something; you can only lose something

 

advice -it's a noun; something you give as useful information or opinion. Yet you often see people write "advise" instead. Advise is a verb, an action indicating giving advice, as in "I had to advise my client about a personal matter." So you cannot give advise, you can only give advice.

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Easyrider

If you're an English teacher, maybe you're in the wrong place because most of us here can barely spell our names. How we gonna know all that complicated stuff you talking about? Just joking, there's some smart people here, wish I was one.

Edited by Easyrider

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Wombat No More

Now plaster it everywhere about the Filipino penchant for saying/answering "Yes" for NO and "No" for YES and a solution for that, coz I'm buggered if I know how to fix that one and I've been working on the missus for 8 years.

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KennyF

All jokes aside, I cringe every time I see "there, their and they're" mixed up.

 

KonGC

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razorbackhog

Thankums fur thats der educamation. Tinks now i nose why i reapeats 6 grade so many times.

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Headshot

All jokes aside, I cringe every time I see "there, their and they're" mixed up.

 

KonGC

Another one is when people don't know how to spell "tongue"...you know, that big thing in your mouth that keeps wagging. It isn't a tounge or tung. It's a tongue.

 

:)

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kaloy

Good greif, where is eggnoggin when you need him? :)

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Aaron

Now plaster it everywhere about the Filipino penchant for saying/answering "Yes" for NO and "No" for YES and a solution for that, coz I'm buggered if I know how to fix that one and I've been working on the missus for 8 years.

 

Different problem. I wasn't referring to Filipinos in my post!

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Easyrider

I still have trouble with choose and chose, but if I think about it a while I can figure it out. Those single and double letters are confusing sometimes.

 

Which one did you choose? I chose that one.

 

There are too many people making jokes here. They should keep their jokes to themselves. They're going to get banned.

 

He was feeling loose and ready to play cards, but he lose all of his money.

 

I'm going to advise you and I hope you take my advice.

 

How did I do? 100 Wow, I knew I could do it if I chose to. I didn't use, too, because that means also or something like that.

 

I'm ready for the next lesson.

Edited by Easyrider

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SkyMan

All jokes aside, I cringe every time I see "there, their and they're" mixed up.

 

KonGC

You mean you can't just use there for everything? What's wrong with that? You can use your anywhere. What's special about there? Sum of yous guys just where a chip on you're shoulder's.

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SkyMan

Another one is when people don't know how to spell "tongue"...you know, that big thing in your mouth that keeps wagging. It isn't a tounge or tung. It's a tongue.

 

:P

You should REALLY be careful about big things wagging in your mouth. :) :evan_iliadis: :thats-funny:

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SkyMan

Aaron, just so you NO. Loose is also a verb. You can loose your dogs or your shoelaces.

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Athena

If you're an English teacher, maybe you're in the wrong place because most of us here can barely spell our names. How we gonna know all that complicated stuff you talking about? Just joking, there's some smart people here, wish I was one.

 

 

:) :evan_iliadis: :thats-funny:

 

dont be so humble or people might get confused ....... :P

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Jess Bartone

All jokes aside, I cringe every time I see "there, their and they're" mixed up.

And "your, you're, and, um... yore".

 

Cracks me up sometimes to see the use of English here... and some of the worst offenders complain about Filipinos' lack of English. Sheesh. Can't think of any right now dagnabbit, but I'll try to remember to paste a few here... without naming anyone of course, just in the interest of education and a little smile.

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Jess Bartone

He was feeling loose and ready to play cards, but he lose all of his money.

 

 

I'm ready for the next lesson.

Should be "but he lost all of his money".

 

Now you're ready for your next lesson.

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RickyL

Good greif, where is eggnoggin when you need him? :)

 

i before e, except after c.... so its spelled Grief. :evan_iliadis:

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Topper

All jokes aside, I cringe every time I see "there, their and they're" mixed up.

 

KonGC

 

These are two words that have confused me for some time. If anyone can show these words in an example, it would be greatly appreciated. (there and their) I'm okay with they're.

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Easyrider

Jesse,

 

You're lucky I'm typing what my English taught me, otherwise no one would have a clue what I'm saying. Well, maybe Paul, he's from Georgia, hehe.

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tom_shor

These are two words that have confused me for some time. If anyone can show these words in an example, it would be greatly appreciated. (there and their) I'm okay with they're.

 

Well I am not so good with parts of speach but the word there is a location. Like Where is my girlfriend? She's over there with that good looking guy. HEY!

 

They're is a contraction. It is actually the combination of two words. They are. They're

 

Any help?

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Topper

Well I am not so good with parts of speach but the word there is a location. Like Where is my girlfriend? She's over there with that good looking guy. HEY!

 

They're is a contraction. It is actually the combination of two words. They are. They're

 

Any help?

 

Some. What about their? I got the part about there is a location. I use to think their was a location, like put it over their. That is what confused me. Perhaps now I can finally get it straight.

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Aaron

Aaron, just so you NO. Loose is also a verb. You can loose your dogs or your shoelaces.

 

You can "let loose" your dogs; then loose becomes an adjective, while "let" is the verb.

 

As for your laces, or a necktie, you can only "loosen" it, not loose it

Edited by Aaron

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Alan S

"Their" is possessive, i.e., belongs to them.

 

E.G., that is their home.

 

 

 

Now, to really confuse someone, ask how on earth ONE, is pronounced "WUN"?

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mikejwoodnz

One-One was a racehorse, Two-Two was one too, One-One won one race and Two-Two won one too.

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Jess Bartone

You can "let loose" your dogs; then loose becomes an adjective, while "let" is the verb.

 

As for your laces, or a necktie, you can only "loosen" it, not loose it

No, actually "Loose the hounds" is quite correct usage of English. It can also be expressed as "He loosed his arrow". It is not used much these days but it still exists in the dictionary.

 

 

Loose

verb /lo͞os/ 

loosed, past participle; loosed, past tense; looses, 3rd person singular present; loosing, present participle

 

Set free; release

- the hounds have been loosed

 

Untie; unfasten

- the ropes were loosed

 

Relax (one's grip)

- he loosed his grip suddenly

 

v. loosed, loos·ing, loos·es

v.tr.

1. To let loose; release: loosed the dogs.

2. To make loose; undo: loosed his belt.

3. To cast loose; detach: hikers loosing their packs at camp.

4. To let fly; discharge: loosed an arrow.

5. To release pressure or obligation from; absolve: loosed her from the responsibility.

6. To make less strict; relax: a leader's strong authority that was loosed by easy times.

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Topper

]

"Their" is possessive, i.e., belongs to them.

 

E.G., that is their home.

 

 

 

Now, to really confuse someone, ask how on earth ONE, is pronounced "WUN"?

 

Thanks. To answer the last part about ONE, you have to ask a New Yorker about that.

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