Jump to content

Got Snails?


Recommended Posts

A_Simple_Man

snails are NOT toxic, as the Simple Man asserts,

 

Simple Man did not mean to state that snails ARE toxic

 

 

Perhaps I did not make myself clear. What I meant was: My wife and many local friends will eat balut, dried fish, dog, python, seasnails, etc etc. There are only 3 things I know of that they do not eat. Since my palate will not allow me to eat the delicacies they already consume, then I am very suspicious of the contents of them snails. So I mean to say "I'm not gonna eat it. Lets get Jesse to eat it, he'll eat anything" (BTW whatever happened to that Mikey kid on the old Life cereal commercial that I am plagiarizing here?)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jess Bartone

Lets get Jesse to eat it, he'll eat anything

 

If only you knew how many times those exact words have been uttered.

Link to post
Share on other sites
samatm

Thanks for the input guys and gals but I havn't yet heard of anyone witnessing these local varieties being cooked up. I have gobs these goomers floating around the backyard. My wife hates them as they attack her garden and she is prone to rock the poor lil slimy dudes.

 

I wont be ingesting anything until its verified safe. Butete anyone, wild mushrooms..no thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites
ArieBombarie

I love escargot but even the French just eat one kind of land snail, lucky it is the one eating up their vines, I would treat the rest as bird food

Link to post
Share on other sites
rainymike

Am not expert on this, but I'd recommend against eating African snails. We had them in Hawaii as a garden pest and I'm pretty sure there were instances of people coming down with meningitis from them. Not sure if that can be cleaned out of the snails.

 

But if they were disease and toxin free ... well, cooked in butter and garlic seems to be the way to go.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to eat store bought snails in California a lot. Cooked in butter and garlic and served in their shells. When bought in a package the snail meet (whole) and shells were included.

I know there at least, used to be a company in Santa Barbara, California that markets snails commercialy. The guy stumbled across the knowledge that the local garden pest variety were the edible type. Went from paying the local kids a few cents for the ones they collected to operating a farm..

You might google santa barbara snails or something like that and do some research. This was back in the 80's and ninety's.

Link to post
Share on other sites
samatm

Check out this link. I may be in Snail business. This is exactly what my snails look like. Escargot in two weeks? Do you guys have the same critters creeping around your neck of the woods?

 

 

 

http://www.energybulletin.net/node/51110

 

 

Published Dec 14 2009 by Restoring Mayberry, Archived Jan 2 2010

Eating snails

by Brian Kaller

 

Attitudes toward food change constantly, and perfectly edible food that is shunned in one era might be highly prized in another. Early European colonists in America almost starved before eating the lobsters all around them, and even then they were considered disgusting, used only for feeding prisoners and servants and baiting fishhooks. Only about a hundred years ago did lobster become prized as a delicacy, until today it drives an industry worth $280 million in America alone.

 

People today have similarly strange attitudes towards snails. They command a high price in expensive restaurants, where they are shipped in from France at great cost – yet we might have hundreds of identical snails in our own garden, and try to get rid of them.

 

The common snails seen in Irish gardens are the same species as restaurant snails, and are perfectly edible – you are not likely to see the few bad-tasting or endangered species. In fact, that's how they came to be on the islands -- they are not native to Britain or Ireland, and were brought to England by Romans specifically for breeding and eating, only to get loose -- as rabbits would do under the Normans a thousand years later, and grey squirrels a thousand years after that.

 

To this day, a few people here raise them in their homes or gardens for profit or food, and they are about the lowest-maintenance livestock – if that’s the word – that you can keep.

 

Snails love to crawl up wet walls and can often be seen in large numbers after a rain – in the day, or when it’s drier, they wedge themselves in crevices and hide in their shells. Take some children with you, and gathering them will be as fun as finding Easter eggs.

 

Even snails raised in the safest environments would need to be starved for at least two or three days, and these days there is a particular danger they may have eaten poison or pesticides, so keep them at home and feed them for a while until anything bad has passed out of their system. I keep mine in a plastic tub with air holes for a few weeks, and each day I clean out the tub and give them slices of organic carrot. Some recommend only a week or two to clean out the toxins, but I like to be on the safe side. Don’t give them any food in the last few days before cooking them.

 

To cook snails, wash them and place them to one side and boil some water. Snails don’t have much of a brain stem, but if you are concerned about their feeling pain you can place them in the refrigerator while the water boils, and they will go to sleep.

 

I toss them in the boiling water for about ten minutes, pour them into a strainer, run them under cold water, and with a skewer fish them out of the shell. Cut away the gall, the last piece to come out of the shell.

 

I like to fry a few slivers of finely-sliced rashers (bacon) in a pan and fry for a few minutes until they are lightly done. Then I toss in a heap of de-shelled snails, stir and cook for about ten more minutes.

 

I add some spices and finely-chopped scallions about five minutes in, a big colander of washed parsley right before the end and sautee the lot for a minute or so. Finally, I glaze the pan with lemon juice. I then serve them over diced salad with avocados. You, of course, can experiment with whatever way you like best.

 

Brian Kaller is a former newspaper editor from Missouri and now lives in rural Ireland with his family. He continues to write freelance articles, published in the American Conservative, his local newspaper, and his blog, http://www.restoringmayberry.blogspot.com.

 

Editorial Notes

 

Permaculturalist Bill Mollison famously said, "You don't have a snail problem; you have a duck deficiency.

 

Kaller would revise it to: "You don't have a snail problem; you have gourmet fare."

 

Many other so-called pests and weeds are tasty or useful. In our area, stinging needles when properly prepared are nutritious and delicious. We treat cardoons as a potentially invasive weed, but Italians have prized it highly for centuries.

 

Brian Kaller, a regular EB contributor, just had an article published in the Dallas Daily News: Being part of something bigger at home. It is a condensed version of an article published in Front Porch Republic.

 

-BA

Link to post
Share on other sites

i dont know if those type are edible,

in western australia as a boy in primary school i went to there was 95% italians, some families used to eat the brown garden snail (Cornu aspersum).

first they would gather the snails and keep them in a box with a lid on for 1 or 3 days (i cant remember how long) to let them empty thier digestive tract before cooking. i spose u need to keep the box moist inside too. they said they were good eating.

 

and samatm, those in your link look the same type of brown snail, if they are a pest, i used to have Khaki Campbell ducks, they love them and will eat them and not your veges, muscovies and white ducks will eat your leafy vege plants before the snails.

Edited by mojo
Link to post
Share on other sites
KennyF

Blue tongue lizards go nut over snails.

They'll eat a dozen at a sitting.

 

KonGC

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jess Bartone

Many years ago I kept Oscar Cichlids which loved snails too. They would suck a live snail from its shell in the blink of an eye. Amazingly there's a Youtube video of an Oscar eating a snail:

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
Alfred E. Neuman

the snails that are edible here are locally called kuhol, ill ask the previous owner of a well known filipino restaurant where she sourced them , served with coco milk and garlic...

Link to post
Share on other sites
RogerDat

Greetings! If a Filipino won't eat it, WHY would you want to? When in Rome do as they do is a good saying, and can keep you out of the morgue!

99 % of PI fauna and flora has not been documented or studied, but what little that has been, turned up MANY DEADLY things lurk under your feet here. Watch Monster Inside me series, :bump:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..