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Affordable Cooking Oil availability in P.I. ?


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easy44

What is the best oil to use for cooking french fries (chips). I have been using corn oil but it doesn't seem to get hot enough. I like them brown and slightly crispy on the outside.

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mahogany

What is the best oil to use for cooking french fries (chips). I have been using corn oil but it doesn't seem to get hot enough. I like them brown and slightly crispy on the outside.

 

I have never had problems making my french fries crispy: you need to cook them twice though...but then again - I am not a chef :biggrin_01:

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Stranded Shipscook

What is the best oil to use for cooking french fries (chips). I have been using corn oil but it doesn't seem to get hot enough. I like them brown and slightly crispy on the outside.

As said, you can either fry them twice. Once tll they get little brown on the tips, or all the way through, i use both methods depending on the need for fries druing operation..

 

best (and cheapest) is Coconut oil. Cut the chips and wash them 3 or four times to remove ALL starch, which makes them burn pre maturely.

 

Them fry them swimming in oil. A regular pot does the job just a fine. With the temperature... get a cheap dip temp gauge or a meat gauge which can hold the temp. . (Whitegold)

 

if your oven doesn't have enough heat, you got a problem, but that seldom is the case.

 

If you want to throw away some cash, you can alternatively sprinkle water in the hot oil while frying, this will make the oil bubble ( and age fast as hell) and in the process they get browner and crispy.

 

Hope that helps.

Edited by Guenther
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easy44

You guys mentioned cooking them twice. Does that mean you remove them from the oil and let cool, then cook them again? Seems like if I cook them long enough to get brown they end up dry and over cooked. Maybe my stove isn't getting hot enough, but the oil is bubbling.

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KennyF

What is the best oil to use for cooking french fries (chips). I have been using corn oil but it doesn't seem to get hot enough. I like them brown and slightly crispy on the outside.

 

It may not be the most healthy but you cant go past animal fat for making chips.

Lard (pig fat) is great as is dripping (beef fat) but I've heard the best is duck or goose fat.

 

The Philippines has some great spuds, as good as any in the world, but not every variety will make great chips.

 

Definitely wash and dry before deep frying. Use ice cold water to wash.

 

Cook first by sort of boiling in oil (lower temperature than normal).

Let cool. Mash them around a bit if you like the crispy bits.

 

Get your fat really hot and give them that second quick final fry.

 

KonGC

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Stranded Shipscook

You guys mentioned cooking them twice. Does that mean you remove them from the oil and let cool, then cook them again? Seems like if I cook them long enough to get brown they end up dry and over cooked. Maybe my stove isn't getting hot enough, but the oil is bubbling.

bubbling oil is an indications of water in the oil(there always is a little btw.). so wait until the bubbles and crackling sound disappears.

As a carefully taken thumbrule, stick a wood like a bbq stick in the oil an when it shows bubbles the oil is good for frying. Then never put too many fries in at the same time, as it considerably cools down the oil. (Thats a common mistake)

 

Doesn't matter at all, once or twice. I just pre fry them so i got half cooked ones available for busy times in order to reduce production time.

 

as a nice side effect, when fried twice, they stay crispy even when cold, good for take out.

 

OH, last reminder : Commercial deep frozen french fries in the Philippines SUCK. If you use them, the result is always disaster. Only fast food chains can use them, but they have specially made ones and other equipment.

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miles-high

Being somewhat health-conscious, my “cooking oil” has been Extra Virgin olive oil. Temp is an issue sometimes but then, I use the regular olive oil... I do not deep-fry anything anyways...

 

Extra Virgin olive oil 1L, the same producer (Corvita, etc.)

Meijer’s or most grocery stores in the US Midwest: $25 to $27…

Rustan’s or SM here in Manila: about PHP520 or $12 @43…

 

I guess the Godfathers are making tons of money in the US…

 

 

:biggrin_01:

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Stranded Shipscook

Being somewhat health-conscious, my “cooking oil” has been Extra Virgin olive oil. Temp is an issue sometimes but then, I use the regular olive oil... I do not deep-fry anything anyways...

 

Extra Virgin olive oil 1L, the same producer (Corvita, etc.)

Meijer’s or most grocery stores in the US Midwest: $25 to $27…

Rustan’s or SM here in Manila: about PHP520 or $12 @43…

 

I guess the Godfathers are making tons of money in the US…

 

 

:biggrin_01:

 

Your correct, but then it is also the staple oil in the med' countries. super cheap there ! They wouldn't use anything else. But here its just too expensive.

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KennyF

Being somewhat health-conscious, my “cooking oil” has been Extra Virgin olive oil. Temp is an issue sometimes but then, I use the regular olive oil... I do not deep-fry anything anyways...

Extra Virgin olive oil 1L, the same producer (Corvita, etc.)

Meijer’s or most grocery stores in the US Midwest: $25 to $27…

Rustan’s or SM here in Manila: about PHP520 or $12 @43…

I guess the Godfathers are making tons of money in the US…

 

I don't mean to upset you but in the USA ALL olive oil can be branded extra virgin.

FROM USA TODAY: Two university labs found that over 60% of olive oil tested labeled as 'extra virgin' was in fact cheaper, lower-quality olive oils. Currently there are no legal standards in the USA for labeling olive oil, beyond that it must be 100% olive oil.

Why? I don't know but perhaps it's the same in RP.

 

As an aside, I have never seen success with olive oil when heated.

It's great for salads and just dipping crusty bread in but there are far better oils for cooking.

 

KonGC

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easy44

Ok, thanks guys. Will try some of those tricks!

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Stranded Shipscook

I don't mean to upset you but in the USA ALL olive oil can be branded extra virgin.

FROM USA TODAY: Two university labs found that over 60% of olive oil tested labeled as 'extra virgin' was in fact cheaper, lower-quality olive oils. Currently there are no legal standards in the USA for labeling olive oil, beyond that it must be 100% olive oil.

Why? I don't know but perhaps it's the same in RP.

 

As an aside, I have never seen success with olive oil when heated.

It's great for salads and just dipping crusty bread in but there are far better oils for cooking.

 

KonGC

 

it won't affect shopping in the Philippines, because the oil is imported from Italy, Spain or Greece, where labeling is strict. Could become interesting in that "S&R" store though.

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Stranded Shipscook

Ok, thanks guys. Will try some of those tricks!

 

I almost got the impression you never gonna thank us for all our efforts :biggrin_01:

 

All of the tips are valid and good btw.

 

I have to say, we got some talented guys out there ! :as-if:

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Jess Bartone

Talking about butter, ghee has a high smoke point too, about the same as rice bran oil.

I thought ghee was pig fat.

 

 

the "framework" left

Those little stringy crispy bits are bloody delicious, but tend to push the calorie count up. Ok for a rare treat, possibly best with a salad containing at least raw onion, garlic, ginger and celery, and definitely with a vinaigrette of extra virgin olive oil and a fine red wine vinegar.

 

 

 

 

 

Is the margarine/butter available in RP suitable for making roux (gravy/stew) base?

You can buy salted and unsalted butter here from Australia, Denmark. New Zealand etc.

 

..................

 

I forgot to mention that you will also find at least 4 grades of flour.

I got some salted Aussie butter in provincial Mindanao (Mercury drug) and some crusty white Italian/Spanish style bread from Joe the local resident Spaniard Restaurateur in his fine establishment "Europe Cuisine". He cooks his own bread, makes preserved meats, and grows produce, mainly sweet delicious tomatoes, at their farm 5 or 10 K out of town. I like multi-grain, but thick slices of fresh Spanish bread with lashings of butter is hard to beat... the family took to it like ducks to water. I think I asked you before Kenny, have you seen multi grain flour?

 

 

It may not be the most healthy but you cant go past animal fat for making chips.

There seems to be conflicting views on the health or otherwise of animal fat for cooking. It is apparently clear now that consuming animal fat will not in itself increase your cholesterol count, it is you, the individual, that manufactures cholesterol, based on the overall diet and activity pattern. In a balanced and widely varied diet, I don't think there is any "bad" food as such, it's just that too many people focus on a narrow group of foods and suffer for it. A silly example popped into my head... if the kids wanted to go to Maccas all the time, you could make it a treat once every 2 months, I doubt if Maccas 6 times a year would hurt anyone. Bread and dripping never hurt us as kids, but mum would not let us have it more often than 2 weeks... that and we never stopped moving, played physically so always burning it off, plus football, and no more than 3 hours of tv a week. We get older and slow down but we still like the same food we liked when we were 4 or 5 foot tall nuclear reactors. Remember Yin and Yang.

 

The message is eat anything but don't forget to mix it up with everything... including deep fried sausage casings... pig bowels... mmm lami.

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Markham

I thought ghee was pig fat.

 

Ghee is clarified butter and is the cooking fat of choice in India and Pakistan. It is wonderful for frying - it has a high smoke temperature - but you wouldn't want to bake a cake using it,

 

My preferred frying and roasting fat would be (beef) dripping but it's all but disappeared from the stores in the UK. Here some meat shops will sell you lumps of beef fat which you can render down:

  1. Trim any skin and meat from the fat
  2. Cut the fat into roughly quarter-inch cubes
  3. Get a large saucepan, preferably one that is taller than its width and put the fat cubes in it.
  4. Fill the saucepan with cold water to within an inch of the top
  5. Set on the stove and heat gently.
  6. When the water begins boiling, reduce the heat and allow to simmer. I kilo of fat will take around 3 hours (and yield around 700+ grams of dripping)
  7. As the water level drops, top up with fresh and stir from time to time
  8. When time's up, remove the pan from heat, cover and allow to cool completely
  9. When cold, the dripping forms a hard block floating on the water. Remove, dry (with paper towel) and store in the ref until needed.

You can also render lard from pig fat using this method but lard has a lower melting temperature so when the pan reaches room temperature (after the rendering), you may need to cool the pan more in the ref before you're able to separate the lard from the water.

 

 

 

 

Mark

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TheMatrix

Coconut oil is the way to go! I worry what I will use when I go back to the U.S. Canola is pure man-made garbage; olive oil turns toxic at high temperatures. Coconut adds the best flavor. As far as coconut oil being a saturated fat... yes it is, but it is healthy for you. I actually drink 5 Tablespoons of VCO everyday in addition to all the cooking I do with it and my blood pressure and cholesterol levels have dropped tremendously over the last three years. Like I said, I worry what I will use when I go back to the U.S. as coconut "cooking" oil is not so plentiful. :-(

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