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derockcebu

Does anyone live in a yurt? I'm on a modest budget and I plan to set one up on a rural hill in the Cebu mountains. Can I buy one in the Philippines? What kind of shipping problems do you foresee if I order from USA. They weigh anywhere between 750-2200 lbs.

 

Thought of getting one from Pacific Yurts

 

Thanks in advance.

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Headshot

The walls and roof of a true yurt are made of heavy wool felt, which will NOT do well in an extremely humid climate like we have in the Philippines. You will notice that the areas where yurts come from (Mongolia and Tibet) are very arid, with very low humidity. I suppose you could create a yurt using canvas or heavy nylon, but it won't have the same insulating properties as the felt. I'm also not sure how you would secure a yurt on a hill during high winds (typhoons). I have never seen any kind of yurt here. Mainly what you see here (in the way of tent-like structures) are canvas shelters with steel frames (which can be staked to the ground using long steel stakes or bolted to a concrete platform). Every barangay has some of those shelters for use in emergencies and for funerals.

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why not use a couple of 40 ft shipping containers buried in the side of the mountain. I think you can get them for 2,000 dollars a piece

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billten

This has to be a joke. If you want a cheap house, then build it out of bamboo, local products, available locally. Yurt, meh...

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USMC-Retired

Hell I did not even know what Yurt is, was or has been. Know someone that lives in one you must be joking. Sound like some Scandinavian Term and anything from that part of world for housing probably does not do well here.

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Stranded Shipscook

As said, go local then.

 

For the prices i say in your info, the costs go up to 9000 US$, Add the shipping and you can build a luxurius bamboo house with Nippa. Or a small to medium size concrete/fibercement house.

 

Most houses here are becoming expensive due to extensive plumming,electricals, fancy roofing and floorings.

 

Really, check the local availablities and infos at the place you intend to live, there are many local eople building you a house for less than 1000 US$, that includes simple shower and watertoilet already, as well as kitchenplumming.

I have plan in the very near future weekend Bungalows made of Hollowblocks, and concrete floor/roof. Each about 25 sqm. My contractor estimated 955,- US$ for the shells incl. french windows.Electric and plumbing.

 

Add tiles,doors, paint and bathroom accessoires (which i do myself) and you probably pay double if you stay simple.

And these are the things which make the building "normal" or "high end".

You can easily pay 5 times for the "finishing". Choice is yours.

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Headshot

Derockcebu, I need to ask you a question. Are you married to a Filipina or are you Filipino yourself? If not, this exercise is moot because you can't own property (land) in the Philippines. You can't put a house or a yurt or a tent on YOUR property because you can't own it. You could lease property, in which case, something temporary might make sense...because when the lease is up, you may need to move it or lose it.

 

Even if you ARE married to a Filipina (and can therefore own land in her name) or are Filipino yourself, you should be careful what you wish for. Hilltops here are lightning magnets, so if you build on top of a hill, you become the highest point. There are a LOT of lightning storms here. Also, hilltops here are generally pretty inaccessible unless you have a LOT of money to build a road up there. And lastly, a lot of property in the mountains (and hills) is NOT titled land, so owning it becomes problematic. I know hilltops look great at first glance (I looked at them myself), but there are a lot of problems with them.

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derockcebu

Headshot, i'm married to a filipina. Yes, you are right about the fact that there is no land title and the dirt road is several hundred meters away. That's why I thought of a temporary/semi-permanent structure like a yurt to live in.

 

According to the manufacturer, their modern yurts are made from reinforced vinyl fabric or woven polyester. For tropical climates, they recommend "a tinted dome skylight with opener, insulation, additional windows, or a tropical cupola". It helps also of course to locate the yurt under a natural canopy. Many yurt manufacturers claim that their designs can withstand winds of up to 100mph, so maybe typhoons are not something to be overly concerned about.

 

The location is not on a hilltop but somewhere futher down the slope on a rather flat area.

 

Thank you everyone for your inputs. I'm still considering all the different housing options.

 

 

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razorbackhog

It's not a yert but would fare better in a tropical climate.

 

Concrete tent...

 

http://www.wimp.com/concretetents/

 

Thought these were nice till I read this. There is a catch, though. At the moment the concrete tents cost at least £10,000 ($16,000) each.

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You could have a bamboo mansion built for the price of a small yurt.

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batman2525

Derockcebu, I need to ask you a question. Are you married to a Filipina or are you Filipino yourself? If not, this exercise is moot because you can't own property in the Philippines. You can't put a house or a yurt or a tent on YOUR property because you can't own it. You could lease property, in which case, something temporary might make sense...because when the lease is up, you may need to move it or lose it.

 

Even if you ARE married to a Filipina (and can therefore own land in her name) or are Filipino yourself, you should be careful what you wish for. Hilltops here are lightning magnets, so if you build on top of a hill, you become the highest point. There are a LOT of lightning storms here. Also, hilltops here are generally pretty inaccessible unless you have a LOT of money to build a road up there. And lastly, a lot of property in the mountains (and hills) is NOT titled land, so owning it becomes problematic. I know hilltops look great at first glance (I looked at them myself), but there are a lot of problems with them.

 

You cant own property.....?? I thought it was land you couldnt own...

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Mr. Mike

....just my opinion,,,,,,the OP offers an interesting housing alternative. I never heard of this....Reminds me of the old military quonset huts in the 30's and 40's.

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Headshot

You cant own property.....?? I thought it was land you couldnt own...

Well...since he was talking about putting up a yurt, I didn't think he was thinking of erecting it inside a condominium (which is the ONLY thing a normal foreigner can own here without a Filipina wife).

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KennyF

Well...since he was talking about putting up a yurt, I didn't think he was thinking of erecting it inside a condominium (which is the ONLY thing a normal foreigner can own here without a Filipina wife).

 

I think what batman2525's trying to get at is that you can own property but not the land the property is on.

Using the word "property" to mean "a house" for instance.

I know foreigners who have 25 year leases with option of further 25 years on a patch of land who have built homes which they own on that land.

 

That said, I think the yurt idea is a no go.

You can build quite a nice house in RP using local materials for a lot less that that.

A buddy on Camiguin island built quite a nice large home using cement slab, hollow block walls to 1 meter and double amocan walls with pig wire between for security. All up including electricity and pluming 140,000 pesos ($US3,250)

 

KonGC

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