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NRG

What to do if a foreigner dies.

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NRG

Hi to all,

 

Recently i had a good friend die all of a sudden who had no girlfriend or wife, his name was Howard 60 years of age and lived in Dalaguete Cebu. After talking with Paul we thought it would be a good idea to share the information that i learnt from death to burial so if any other member finds that they are in the same position, they will have some idea of procedures and costs. Howard died at 7.45am fortunately i was by his side at the time so he was not on his own. First thing i learnt is that they will not move the body to the morgue unless there is a friend or relative present. I then had to aquire his Philippines death certificate which a friend or relative has to sign. They will want to know about his occupation, birth date, full name, current address and whether they are to be buried or cremated, so have these facts in hand when you go back to the hospital to aquire the death certificate. I wanted Howard moved to a funeral home asap, so had to pay his medical bill that morning before they would release his body. After i recieved the death certificate i had to take it to another medical center where another doctor signed it off, then i had to go to the local municipality hall and register his death there at a cost of 200 pesos. I went back then to the funeral home and was offered packages from 32,000 pesos for cremation and starting at 45,000 pesos for burial, though i had to pay 50,000 pesos because he was over 6ft tall and had to get a slightly larger coffin. The package included embalment, coffin, a week period of stay at the funeral home and transporting the body around. As Howard was non religious we had him buried in the municipality grave yard, at a cost of 1000 pesos for the plot. If he was Catholic the church would want 5000 pesos for the plot. I then had to arrange for someone to dig the grave and put a slab of concrete over the top. That came to 900 pesos but i had to supply the cement which was two bags in total. I also got Howard a plague to go on top i choose a concrete one for 600 pesos, though there was a mable one for 1500 pesos. Then there was the food and drink after the burial i brought 100 cokes and 100 pieces of bread for the Filipinos and a round of beer at Charitos in Dalaguete for the foreigners. As he was renting the owner of the house was unwilling to have him there until the burial so I had no choice but to leave him at the burial home until the day of his burial, where i then moved him to where i am staying for the afternoon so people could come and pay their respects and sign the condolence book.. You also need to speak to the Barangy Captain to organise the Barangy Tanod to help with the traffic on the way to the cementary, that cost 500 pesos also. Flowers came to 5000 pesos. I sold of his possessions in the house he was renting as it was unfurnished, and raised enough money to pay half the funeral home to get his body released from there and for the other items i have already mentioned. I of course kept his personal possessions and sent them back to the UK for his son to keep.

 

I had the full authorisation from his only son Tony to make all the arrangements and to get him buried, unfortunatly he could not make his fathers burial. Though he will be out here sometime soon. The next step after he was buried was to get a British death certificate from the British embassy in Manila. This is no simple feat. I had to get Tony to sign an application death form and send it over to me. Then i had to send that with his passport and Philippine death certificate to the embassy to get the British one, this cost 12.750 pesos. It took them 5 working days to do their own investigation and send the British death certificate back to me. I then had to FedEx that back to the UK to Tony, so he could give it to his lawyer to have the Will read out. I managed to pursuade his bank here in the Philippines to give me his account balance, but i will need a letter of authorisation from Tony with a copy of Tony's birth certificate to allow me to draw out the funds. Though when Tony comes here he can do that himself.

 

 

Well thats about all i have learnt in a very short time. I hope no one will have to go through this, but if they do i hope this helps in some way to point you in the right direction and have some idea what the procedure is. Thanks for reading,

 

Take care all,

 

Matt.

 

-------------------------------

 

Edit: I found some photos I took of Howard.

 

Howard with Jimmy Jetski, at Charito's in Dalaguete.

post-1-0-27480600-1311661323_thumb.jpg

 

Howard having a cigarette.

post-1-0-02755600-1311661332_thumb.jpg

Edited by Admin
Added a couple of images I found of Howard
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Stranded Shipscook

Thanks for shariung this valuable inomation with us, and i am sorry for the loss of your good friend.

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Paul

Howard was a hell of a nice guy. He and I bought each other drinks on several occasions, both at Leyland's (Argao) and at Charito's (Dalaguete). He was a tall, slender, soft spoken man, if others do not remember him, but who may have met him.

 

He will certainly be missed by many.

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Paul

I just added a couple of photos of Howard, for those who may remember him.

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UZI

We should all be so lucky, to have friends like you mate.

 

Cheers

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Cary

Howard and Big Rob this is a sad day. RIP to you both.

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Ozepete

We should all be so lucky, to have friends like you mate.

 

Cheers

 

I agree Uzi, he was lucky to have a mate like Matt to arrange things for him...

Great report Matt, you know what true mate-ship is all about.

I hope your friend rests in peace.

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mojo

thanks for sharing the info, sorry for the loss.

u gotta live that extra bit more now for those who cant.

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budbrown

This is a good reminder to us to leave information on what we want done, if something should happen to us here in the Philippines. Matt was saddled with a tremendous responsibility and handled it without one complaint. Howard picked me and my wife up from the airport when we first arrived here in Cebu. He was a good man and will be greatly missed.

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samatm

excellent job. You are indeed a great friend to have. An excellent idea for us to all have prearranged funeral plans already in order.

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Jawny

I am very pleased to have someone make a post about this topic. I know my own comments come many weeks after the loss of your friend, Howard. My condolences, albeit belated.

 

I had a friend die in a car accident many years back while we were in Germany. It was tragic enough to have him die, but his new bride of less than a year was now confronted with all sorts of difficulties. Thankfully, like Howard, friends came to the rescue and helped her through the process. Even with help, there still were major problems. His body was shipped back to the US, but when it arrived, in time for the funeral service, his personal effects were not with him. No theft. Just a bureaucratic procedure unknown to us as the stuff was held until someone came to get it.

 

Unfortunately, too late for the funeral. Lesson learned, but a shock to the widow. And, that is my point of posting. Lessons from Matt's experience are very helpful.

 

By including details such as the purchase of cement, cokes and bread, funeral home, embassy etc. others faced with the same situation will not be surprised. It's always a problem for survivors, but is made worse when they are in a situation where they can't get the help they would in their home country.

 

I tried several times to create a checklist for my survivors. It was like planning a NASA space mission. Way more detail than I had realized. Matt's details about the death certificate are a helpful warning. Sadly, it is understandable why an embassy would hesitate to certify a death in a world where fraudulent claims exist. I know that the US system is very much like this as far as using care when verifying a death.

 

I know that some people living overseas will anticipate their respective embassies will provide assistance. If I'm not mistaken, most embassies make it clear what they will or will not do to assist. A visit to the embassy website is a useful bit of time spent.

 

Of course, a forum like this is very helpful, as well. It is posters like Matt who make it a reason to be associated with this group.

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Lory

Thanks so much for the valuable information and condoleances. The loss of a good friend is always a loss of a part of ourselves.

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georgecombey

Hi,

 

The usual step to do when you have seen/witnessed the death of a foreigner is to report it to the local authorities.

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Bill H

Great read, thanks to all the posters. The question in my mind now is what happens if the deceased didn't have a friend to take care of all these things and pay these fees?

 

Bill

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