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Bob Ward

We've been through some toaster oven lasagna and fish and chips. So I thought we might share some recipes and or cooking tips we have learned here or anywhere. Since I mentioned cole slaw in another thread and even the Filipinos liked it, I will start with that

 

Creamy Cole Slaw

 

Shreaded cabbage

Shreaded purple cabbage if you care about presentation

Shreaded carrots

A small amount of diced onion (optional)

 

Amount of each is up to the chef. I use 3/4 cabbage, 1/8 purple cabbage and 1/8 carrots.

 

Dressing

Equal parts of Miracle Whip and Sour Cream

For this recipe we will say 8 ounces of each

 

1-2 lablespoons of apple cider vinegar to liking

More if you like it extra tart

 

1-2 tablespoons of sugar

More for the Filipinos :as-if:

 

Salt and pepper to taste but 1 tsp of salt is about right

 

Mix it all together and let it stand in the Ref for at least 1-2 hours before serving.

 

If you make a big batch to have some left over. To keep it from getting watery the next day, try shreading the cabbage and carrots the night before and put them in a sealed container overnight. This will allo the moisture to be released into the bottom of the container then pour it off before mixing the dressing in.

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where do i buy sour cream?

 

your coleslaw is just toss in the refrigerator? no need to boil or use heat??

 

=============

 

i want to share my egg recipe, my wife like it best

 

ingredients needed

 

4 pcs of egg

4 pcs of saba banana chopped in cubes.

1 pc. onion chopped

1 pc. chicken thigh chopped in cubes

1 cup of potato cubes

3 tbsp. of green peas

1 tbsp oil

 

procedure:

 

mix egg, saba banana, potato, green peas in a big bowl

then

heat the coil, cook the onions, then the chicken.

mix the onion and the chicken with the big bowl ingredients

and fry them in a slow fire with little oil

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Bob Ward
where do i buy sour cream?

 

your coleslaw is just toss in the refrigerator? no need to boil or use heat??

 

=============

 

i want to share my egg recipe, my wife like it best

 

ingredients needed

 

4 pcs of egg

4 pcs of saba banana chopped in cubes.

1 pc. onion chopped

1 pc. chicken thigh chopped in cubes

1 cup of potato cubes

3 tbsp. of green peas

1 tbsp oil

 

procedure:

 

mix egg, saba banana, potato, green peas in a big bowl

then

heat the coil, cook the onions, then the chicken.

mix the onion and the chicken with the big bowl ingredients

and fry them in a slow fire with little oil

 

No heat required for cole slaw recipe. Sour cream is available at Ayala, SM or Emall near the cheese.

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Nice idea for a thread Bob,

 

 

I'm not a chef, but I do spend alot of time in the kitchen. I was raised in a family of some really great cooks. My Grandmother on my mothers side and my Mother where both really good cooks. My sisters are a rare breed for sure. They are both old school when it comes to the kitchen, very good cooks themselves. As for me, I hung out in the kitchen myself alot, the Offical Tast Tester...LOL

 

But I do cook alot and my wife, family and friends enjoy when I cook for them.

 

Not sure what to write up here for a recipe, but let me ask, any request?.....I'll be glad to type up my version of your favorites, that is if I know it.

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Our most popular dish here for when we have visitors is garlic bread made with baget and a good melted cheese over the top, served with red wine and some nibbles.

 

I also love blue cheese sauce with bacon bits served over boiled veggies, very easy and quick to impress.

 

Mind you I wont be eating much since my lap band

 

Heehehehehe

 

James

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Bob Ward
Nice idea for a thread Bob,

 

 

I'm not a chef, but I do spend alot of time in the kitchen. I was raised in a family of some really great cooks. My Grandmother on my mothers side and my Mother where both really good cooks. My sisters are a rare breed for sure. They are both old school when it comes to the kitchen, very good cooks themselves. As for me, I hung out in the kitchen myself alot, the Offical Tast Tester...LOL

 

But I do cook alot and my wife, family and friends enjoy when I cook for them.

 

Not sure what to write up here for a recipe, but let me ask, any request?.....I'll be glad to type up my version of your favorites, that is if I know it.

 

You have to have a favorite, or the most requested!

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Bob Ward

Here is one for those in the US. Because we will vever find canned crescent riolls here!

 

One can refrigerated crescent rolls.

One pound of your favorite pork sausage. I like it hot.

2 eight ounce pkgs. cream cheese

1 small minced onion (optional)

1 tsp paprika

Salt and pepper to taste

 

 

Cook the sausage and drain the grease

Soften the cream cheese on defrost in the microwave (no foil) or leave on the counter for 1 hour

 

In a greased glass baking dish, make a layer of the crescent roll on the bottom by unrolling them

Mix the sausage, cream cheese and other ingredients well

Pour the mixture over the layer of crescent rolls and spread evenly

Then add another layer of the crescent rolls on top of the mixture

 

Bake at 375 degrees till the top is nicely browned

 

cool, cut and serve. These are highly transportable for tailgating or the beach!

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Multipurpose Tomato Meat Sauce

 

I use this meat sauce for lasagna, spaghetti, and over rice occasionally. I think it might even work over hot dogs, but I'm a coney guy myself.

 

I use a combo of recipes I found on the web to make my tomato meat sauce. I'd like to say that I take the time to cook the tomatoes from scratch, but I'd be fibbing. I use canned diced tomatoes. If I can find them I use Hunts Diced which have some basil, garlic, and oregano from the can.

 

Ground Beef, 1/4 Kilo or 1/2 pound

Ground Pork, 1/4 Kilo or 1/2 pound

Medium Onion, 1/2 cup, diced very small (a couple of the small local ones will do fine too)

Garlic, 3-4 cloves minced (buy a garlic press or practice your knife skills)

Tomatoes, diced, 1 large can or two smaller cans - 28 oz or 800 grams roughly (smaller cans are 14.5 oz usually)

Tomato Paste, 6 oz or 160 gram can

Water, 2 cups

Cream, 2 Tbsp - 4 Tbsp

Basil, 1 tsp, (Fresh if you can find it, 1/2 tsp dry if not)

Bay Leaf, 1 (whole and remove it before serving)

Sugar, 1 tsp

MSG, 1/2 tsp to taste or not at all (aka Vetsin here)

Cayenne, 1/8 tsp or to taste

Salt, 1/2 tsp or to taste

Pepper, 1/2 tsp or to taste

 

Saute the onions and garlic in oil (preferably olive oil), starting with the onions for 3 minutes or so, then add minced garlic for 30 seconds more. Crumble ground beef and ground pork into the pan. Using a spoon or other cooking utensil break meat up as it cooks so it browns thoroughly. When browned add cream. Continue cooking over medium heat until all cream has evaporated. Only the grease given off by meat should remain. Drain the meat in mesh strainer to get rid of grease.

 

Return meat to the pan, turning down the heat to medium low. Add remaining ingredients. I cheat here adding closer to a tablespoon of fresh basil that I previously chopped and froze into ice cubes for longer storage. The rule of thumb is twice as much of a fresh herb to substitute for the dry herb which the recipe originally called for.

 

The meat is pretty well cooked at this point, you've added the diced tomatoes and the tomato paste and then everything else. When you add the 2 cups of water, you may wonder why this is called a sauce, not just red water. Simmer the whole thing for a full hour uncovered. Not only does the house smell wonderful, but you end up with a lot less liquid. Adjust heat as necessary for a nice slow simmer. If you want to add one cup of water at first and then the second as the sauce gets progressively thicker, you can. I did the first time until I had more confidence in the recipe. A simmer for the non-cooks is a very slow boil with bubbles coming up occasionally. You can run it a touch hotter than that, but don't try to hurry it with a fast boil (bubbling like mad). The slow simmer gives everything in there a chance to get to know each other in a nice warm enviroment.

 

Once done you can use it in a lasagna (my fav) or wherever a nice hearty tomato meat sauce is used. I adapted this recipe from a couple I saw in about.com and the cooks illustrated website.

 

Cream is optional, but a nice touch.

Cayenne makes it a bit spicy, so you might want to roll back to a pinch or completely omit this.

 

Edited for quantities and taste (a couple of times)

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My favorite dish is Mousaka. (I willingly admit that my most frequently used recipe is that I just point the finger at the chickens and tell my maid to scramble some eggs :crack-up: )

 

Anyway, there are several recipes, but I never use one. I just take a lot of grind meat, maybe a kg or something, fry it in the frying pan, put on some spices, like salt, pepper, Italian mix, garlic or something like that. A bit after who I will serve it to. If I eat it myself, I tend to use more spices.

 

Then I either use tomato sauce, or skinned tomatoes from a can, or I skin the tomatoes myself. Depending on what I have readily available.

 

Then I slice potatoes and preboil them.

 

And then I make the cheese gravy. I take some butter, about 1/3 package, melt it, mix in some flour until its thick enough, then add one liter milk. And to get some flavor in it i add some salt and white pepper (or black if I dont have white). When you make white gravy, take the caserole off the heat when adding the flour. Makes it a whole lot easier. Then when you have stirred in all the milk, you can return it to the heat. After the gravy has been simmering for a few minutes, I add about 1/2 a pack of cheese. I like to use Gouda cheese. When the cheese has melted into the gravy, the cheese sauce is done.

 

Then I take out a big baking pan, put one layer of potatoes, one meat sauce layer, one layer of potatoes and another meat sauce layer and top white the cheese gravy. Then I add some more cheese on top of that again. I prefer the Gouda here too.

 

Then you just bake it in the oven for 30 to 45 minutes in about 200C. Served together with a green sallad and maybe bread if you like. And most certainly several bottles of beer.

 

The good thing about this, is I like to eat it when it is cold too. I have had several left over breakfasts with Mousaka.

 

If you get extra cheese sauce, then make some gratinated potatoes with it instead. It can be stored for a couple of days in the ref so you dont have to through it away.

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Okay Gang,

 

I've decided to post a recipe that most everyone here can follow and make. Even if in Cebu...

 

NED"S Touchdown Chili....

 

 

 

Ingredients

 

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Torestre, that sounds like an interesting variation. I may give it a try down the road. My GF wants me to make a bechamel based lasagna, but your recipe sounds like fun. You say you use 1/3 of a package of butter. Big package or small package? I usually buy butter in 225 gram packages, but they have 100 gram packages too. I'm guessing it is the larger of the two.

 

I was taught an interesting way to peel tomatoes along the way. You just stick the love apple on a skewer or long roasting fork, then light up your propane torch. You pass the flame over the tomato without letting it linger too long. The skin bubbles up very quickly under the flame. You just keep turning the tomato until you have the whole thing done. The skin then peels off very easily. Another wonderful adaptation of an industrial tool for cooking!

 

Cebuned, your chili sounds great, well until you hit the beans. I'm a meat-only chili fan. And I fart enough the way it is. If I get any worse, my GF says I have to put a ceiling fan in to move the air! :crack-up:

 

I am curious, are any of you here in the Philippines raising your own herbs for cooking? I've got chives and basil seeds coming in a couple of weeks. I may have some others shipped in too, rosemary, coriander (aka cilantro), and so forth. I suppose living in the mountain area makes me a bit more adventurous in that regard, being surrounded by gardens and produce here in Baguio.

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Tatoosh,

 

You could always delete the beans and leave the toting to me... :crack-up:

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Bob Ward

It's amazing to me how close some of these recipe's are to my own.

 

Tatoosh, try a quarter cup of peeled and minced/shreded carrot when doing the onions for your sauce. It adds a natural but very sublte sweetness to the sause that offsets the acidity of the tomatos. Regarding your addition of cayenne, I sometimes use more than that if making Fra Diavlo sauce for shrimp.

 

I am a true chili fan. I love it with or without beans. Ned, try using beer instead of chicken broth for a variation some time.

 

Seems to me that growing herbs and spices is the way to go. Just as soon as I get the cat problem taken care of!

 

Later I will post a very simple recipe for skillet kielbasa that is one of my favorites.

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It's amazing to me how close some of these recipe's are to my own.

 

Tatoosh, try a quarter cup of peeled and minced/shredded carrot when doing the onions for your sauce. It adds a natural but very sublte sweetness to the sause that offsets the acidity of the tomatos. Regarding your addition of cayenne, I sometimes use more than that if making Fra Diavlo sauce for shrimp.

 

Yeah, the carrot is wonderful source of sweetness to be sure. We use them to balance the heat in chicken curry and in one of Jennifer's favorite dish, Sizzling Gambas. She likes both the curry and shrimp very spicy.

 

Speaking of spiciness, we enjoy the Thai Foods curry paste, but even the yellow paste (purportedly mild) can be very spicy. I have also made their red curry which I liked but Jen not so much even though she is the chili-head of the house. The Golden Curry (comes in a box) which is Japanese, I believe, is much less spicy but still has a lot of curry flavor. And it is thick when prepared to the packages instructions. The Thai is much more liquid than the Japanese. Be sure to have lots of rice ready for either of them!

 

I am unfamiliar with Fra Diavlo sauce, can you describe it?

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Bob Ward
Yeah, the carrot is wonderful source of sweetness to be sure. We use them to balance the heat in chicken curry and in one of Jennifer's favorite dish, Sizzling Gambas. She likes both the curry and shrimp very spicy.

 

Speaking of spiciness, we enjoy the Thai Foods curry paste, but even the yellow paste (purportedly mild) can be very spicy. I have also made their red curry which I liked but Jen not so much even though she is the chili-head of the house. The Golden Curry (comes in a box) which is Japanese, I believe, is much less spicy but still has a lot of curry flavor. And it is thick when prepared to the packages instructions. The Thai is much more liquid than the Japanese. Be sure to have lots of rice ready for either of them!

 

I am unfamiliar with Fra Diavlo sauce, can you describe it?

 

Basically Itallian Sizzling Gambas

 

http://www.bostonchefs.com/glossary/glossa..._term.php?id=73

 

http://recipes.epicurean.com/recipe/268/sh...fra-diavlo.html

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