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Turbota

Procedures for US Immigrant Visa using Direct Consular Filing (DCF)

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Turbota

Folks ... After going though this whole process of getting my wife an Immigrant Visa to the United States, I thought I would write a How-To in order to possibly help others here. This is written in the steps that need to be done from start to finish.

 

Remember, the info posted below is for the foreigner living here in the Philippines that would be considered a "permanent resident to the Philippines"

 

He can save alot of time and trouble by getting his Filipina wife the visa by means of Direct Consular Filing (DCF). Foreigners that are not considered permanent residents to the Philippines will need to file the regular way (the paperwork will be proccessed at a service center in the US (a whole different set of procedures ... not listed here).

 

 

United States IR-1 Immigrant Visa with Direct Consular Filing (DCF)

 

 

Direct Consular Filing (DCF) is the unofficial term for filing an I-130 petition via a Consulate overseas rather than through the U.S. Service Center. This process can expedite the speed in which a beneficiary can enter the United States and become a Green Card holder (Legal Permanent Resident).

 

The U.S. Embassy requires DCF sponsors to have permanent residency in the Philippines. The easiest way to show proof of permanent residency is by way of a 13a Visa. If you do not have a 13a visa to prove residency, the U.S. Embassy may still allow for U.S. citizens to file DCF if they can prove they have established a residence in the Philippines and are living in the Philippines on a permanent bases.

 

When filing a DCF, the sponsor must have the intent to return to the states to permanently live. However, permanent does not mean forever.

 

The petitioner has to fill out Affidavit of Support (Form I-864) as part of the DCF process, and one of the questions asked on the form is the address in the US that the petitioner will be domiciled. Some may question how the petitioner can be a permanent resident in the Philippines and still be domiciled in the states at the same time. Answer

Edited by Turbota
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Headshot

Ron, I'm glad to hear that you were finally successful in getting your wife's visa.

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Cary

Thanks Ron. Great post very informative. Congrats to your wife on getting her visa.

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Turbota

Ron, I'm glad to hear that you were finally successful in getting your wife's visa.

 

Thank You Sir!

 

And were going to Florida ... Flight leaves 22 Jun

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shadow

Good account, Ron. I would point out that this is a good example of how fast proceedures change. I counted 3 items where the information is already obsolete due to changes since you filed last year.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

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m60man

Would you mind sharing that info? Is one the G-325A, and maybe the fee? Thanks in advance.

 

Good account, Ron. I would point out that this is a good example of how fast proceedures change. I counted 3 items where the information is already obsolete due to changes since you filed last year.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

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shadow

Would you mind sharing that info? Is one the G-325A, and maybe the fee? Thanks in advance.

 

Yes, the fees have changed, and are scheduled to change again in July. They are no longer sending out a paper packet 3.

 

There are some errors as well, such as the CR1 green card is valid for 2 years, not one year, and as far as the embassy is concerned they prefer the NBI clearance to be less than 6 months old. The CFO can be taken at any time, before or after the visa issuance. If taken before, after the visa is issued, the recipient returns to the CFO with her certificate of completion to get the sticker in her passport.

 

 

This displays why there are no good "do it yourself" instructions available, and why no two stories are alike. By the time one goes through the process, the process has usually already changed, sometimes more than once. Often things change in midstroke, and the first anybody knows there was a change is when they receive a notice requesting new information or evidence, or a returned petition. Turbo's report is very well done and complete, however, by next year there will have been numerous changes yet again.

 

LinD

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dirtsquirter

Thanks for the info turbota! - Does anyone know how much time can be saved by using the direct consular filing versus processing the paperwork in the states?

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shadow

Thanks for the info turbota! - Does anyone know how much time can be saved by using the direct consular filing versus processing the paperwork in the states?

 

If all is in order, and there are no glitches along the way, processing time for DCF is 3-4 months, vs. filing stateside at 10-12 months.

 

LinD

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fanboat

Just now going thru the k1 visa filed in the states....I had 1 return for more documents.....all in it took me from feb. 2011-june 2011.

 

 

 

 

ps....gigi is in line at the embassy now as I type this.We should pass ok.

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LasVEgasRon

Lots of paperwork and costs what a nightmare. Maybe send the wife to Mexico with a ladder. When the Mexicans get here illegaly and live without fear in some areas where the cops don't even question them. What a double standard. Maybe one day someone could make it easier for the legitimate ones and harder for the illegals.

The system sucks, things have to change.

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SkyMan

Great work on this and thanks. Question, in line 6 of the interview you mean CENOMAR, right? Never heard of a CEMAR other than the marriage cert itself you have on line 7.

 

Also, haven't read through it all but it looks like a bunch of cash going out. App fee, appointment fee, St Lukes, etc. What would you guess to be the total cost for the whole process?

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shadow

Great work on this and thanks. Question, in line 6 of the interview you mean CENOMAR, right? Never heard of a CEMAR other than the marriage cert itself you have on line 7.

 

Also, haven't read through it all but it looks like a bunch of cash going out. App fee, appointment fee, St Lukes, etc. What would you guess to be the total cost for the whole process?

 

The various fees come in at just over $1000. This does not include the cost of documents, or the cost of going to/from Manila for medical and interview a week apart.

 

When a married person orders a CENOMAR, it will come back as a CEMAR, Certificate of Marriage.

 

LinD

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dirtsquirter

Hey Turbota, can you give us an approximate time frame on how long the whole process took, from beginning to end? Thanks!

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SkyMan

Regarding this line: "If the sponsor has been married to the applicant for at least 2 years upon entering the U.S. for the first time, the applicants Immigration status will be IR-1 when they arrive, and they will receive a Ten Year Green Card within weeks of arrival. Then there is no need to go through the 1 year

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