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David_LivinginTalisay

'Raw Honey' as medical treatment?

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David_LivinginTalisay

When doing an Oil Change, one needs to run the engine several minutes so the Oil gets hot, so it becomes more fluid (thinner) and easier to drain.

 

On My XT225, one needs to remove the Alloy Engine Guard, by removing one bolt near the front and then sliding forward to clear the rear off two rubber mounts, in order to gain access to the Drain Plug.

Having also removed the Oil Filter, the old engine oil (just over 1 liter) was drained.

After cleaning the Drain Plug Strainer, and cleaning the very small amounts of metal off the magnet, and the Oil Filter, and rinsing/reverse flushing with solvent, and refitting and tightening to the correct Torque, I could add new Engine Oil (I used Mobil 4T Super as it will be a month or so for shipment by Sea for my Order of Mobil 1 Racing 4T 10W-40 to arrive).

TIP: Motorcycle Exhausts GET VERY HOT and keep their heat even whilst draining Engine oil, cleaning Filters and refitting and adding new Oil.

When I refitted the bolt securing the alloy engine guard, near the front, below the engine, I stupidly lifted my hand up and my skin, between thumb and 1st finger touched the lower part of the exhaust.

Burns HURT and it later blistered.

I know First Aid (having been Train by St. John Ambulance as part of my 'Duke of Edinburgh' Bronze Award).

 

OK so that was 40 Years ago, but the basics of First Aid, that I learned then, I still remember, and just as valid today.

  1. Burn treatment begins with stopping the burning process.
    Cool the burned area with cool running water for several minutes.
    (I did not have running water immediately to hand, but did have a bucket of cool water nearby, so put my hand in that. I then went indoors and ran it under the tap).
     
  2. Do not apply ice, butter, and ointments that may retain the heat around the burned area.
     
  3. Burns and Pain Relief
    Over the counter medications such as Tylenol or Advil can also be used for pain. Follow the directions on the label, and contact your doctor if the pain is not relieved adequately.
     
  4. Cover the burn with cling film in a layer over the burn, rather than by wrapping it around a limb. A clean, clear plastic bag can be used for burns on your hand.

  5. For anything other than MILD 1st Degree Burn, best to see a Doctor, so he can determine severity and recommend best treatment.

1078.jpgBurns

The depth of a burn determines its severity.

 

First degree burns damage the outer layer of skin (epidermis) and cause pain, redness and swelling (erythema).

 

Second degree burns damage the epidermis and the inner layer, the dermis, causing erythema and blistering. Damage from third degree burns extend into the hypodermis, causing destruction of the full thickness of skin with its nerve supply (numbness).

 

Third degree burns leave scars and may cause loss of function and/or sensation.

 

 

Because it later blistered, my Burn was 2nd Degree Burn, so I should have gone to see a Doctor, especially as I accidentally burst the blister when putting on my Motorcycle gloves for GTR #6

Perhaps a Doctor would prescribe the use of Silvadene?

GENERIC NAME: SILVER SULFADIAZINE - TOPICAL (SILL-ver sull-fuh-DYE-uh-zeen)

 

BRAND NAME(S): Silvadene

USES: This medication is used alone or with other medications to help prevent and treat wound infections in patients with severe burns. Silver sulfadiazine belongs to a class of drugs known as topical antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that may infect an open wound. This helps to decrease the risk of the bacteria spreading to surrounding skin or to the blood, causing a serious blood infection (sepsis).OTHER This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.This drug may also be used to help prevent and treat wound infections in patients with skin ulcers from constant pressure (bedsores).

 

HOW TO USE: Apply this medication to a wound using sterile techniques (e.g., using sterile rubber gloves and sterile application swab or tongue depressor), usually 1-2 times daily or as directed by your doctor. The layer of cream should be about one-sixteenth of an inch (1-2 millimeters) thick. The wound should be covered with the cream at all times. Bandages may be applied over the cream, but this is not necessary. If some of the cream rubs off the wound, reapply it immediately. The cream should also be reapplied immediately after hydrotherapy.Treatment usually continues until the wound is completely healed.Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy.Use this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, use it at the same time(s) each day.Inform your doctor if your condition persists or worsens or if you notice increasing redness/tenderness of the skin around the wound.

 

 

Anyone ever heard of Raw Honey being used to Treat Burns (and other skin problems)?

 

Raw Honey Treatments

raw-honey-treatments-800x800.jpg

Raw honey is used to treat several health problems.

Raw honey is used as a treatment for a variety of needs. Topical treatments for various skin problems like acne and seborrhea dermatitis are one of the common applications of raw honey. It is also used as a natural treatment for allergies and even stomach or intestinal problems.

 

Treatment Options

The treatment options vary depending on the problem, but the most common treatment of raw honey is for skin issues. As a topical treatment, it is applied directly to the skin, though some treatments require diluting before application. Otherwise, it is eaten for internal health.

Reasons for Using Raw Honey

Raw honey is naturally antibacterial and antifungal, so it naturally helps the body heal, prevents infections and clears up any bacteria or fungus causing problems. When used as a treatment for acne and similar skin problems, the honey can help minimize the problem over time. For internal health, it can improve digestion and stomach health.

 

Tips

Always use only raw honey rather than "pure" honey because the raw honey is unprocessed and has all of the healing properties without alteration. Pure honey or honey which is processed has removed many of the vitamins and health benefits of raw honey during the process of removing wax and clearing the honey. Raw honey is also good for eating because it contains simple sugars, water and several vitamins and minerals. The vitamins and minerals found in raw honey, like antioxidants, phosphorus, copper, iron, magnesium and zinc, make honey a healthy option for consumption. The website ebeehoney.com states that the darker the honey, the higher the concentration of antioxidants.

 

Warnings

Raw honey should not be used directly on an open wound. Chloe Orford, a writer on Live Allergy Free's website, states that the use of raw honey on an open wound can actually make the problem worse, but that there are medicated versions of raw honey which are appropriate for use on open wounds instead. For acne treatment, honey is effective if acne is caused by bacteria, but if it is caused by hormones or irritation, it might only sooth the problem rather than clear it up.

 

There is some Medical basis for Raw Honey being effective in certain cases, properly used:-

 

See http://pittsborohone...eals/grotte.pdf

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay

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thebob

Wow I didn't know that ice should not be used!

 

I also thought that the degree of a burn was related to the area as well as the depth of the burn.

 

It's very easy to get the classic "Philippine tattoo" which is a scar on your calf from touching a hot exhaust pipe.

 

I'm interested in what you mean by "rinsing/reverse flushing with solvent" in your description.

 

Hope your hand isn't too uncomfortable. Burns hurt.

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KennyF

I did my motor mechanic apprenticeship in the early sixties and even back then, flushing was no longer recommended due to improved engine design and oil quality.

There were those that even considered that flushing did more harm than good.

 

59869ea6575c943c0110594ded626e40fc6694ec.gif

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Headshot

Wow I didn't know that ice should not be used! I also thought that the degree of a burn was related to the area as well as the depth of the burn.

Emergency rooms commonly use ice (in water) to cool burn areas. It is important to pull the heat away from the affected area as quickly as possible, and ice melting in water acts like a heat vacuum. Ice, without water, has a lot of air around it, which doesn't conduct the heat away as quickly. The air acts like an insulator. The longer the area goes without cooling, the worse the damage will be. Therefore, water should be used as a heat conductor.

 

There are now four burn classifications used. First through third-degree burns are pretty much as written. A fourth-degree burn destroys flesh from the inside out. This type of burn can be caused by high voltage electricity (basically drilling through the flesh following nerves or blood vessels) or microwave radiation (which cooks from the inside out). If a person receives a fourth-degree burn, the flesh above the burn will have to be cut surgically to prevent it from splitting apart due to swelling of the area around the burn. Other than that, it is treated similar to a third-degree burn. Debreeding (removing dead flesh) is used in the healing process, and the wound is slowly closed as only healthy flesh surrounds it. It is a long, painful process.

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Headshot

Just because raw honey is used in folk remedies doesn't make it a medical treatment. A lot of folk remedies here also involve the use of witch doctors. Personally, I would avoid putting honey on my skin (especially if the skin is injured). But, that's just me. Go ahead and try it if you want. I prefer to just eat honey (and sparingly at that).

Edited by Headshot

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A_Simple_Man

Just because raw honey is used in folk remedies doesn't make it a medical treatment. A lot of folk remedies here also involve the use of witch doctors. Personally, I would avoid putting honey on my skin (especially if the skin is injured). But, that's just me. Go ahead and try it if you want. I prefer to just eat honey (and sparingly at that).

 

When I took first aid, I was taught that the reason to avoid actual ice on a burn, or any injury for that matter, is the potential for frostbite if you accidentally leave the ice touching one spot for too long. The flesh is already damaged and sensitive to cold as well as hot. As to the honey, I learned that

honey is a concentrated sugar solution any bacteria coming in contact with it will have it water sucked out by osmosis

You can find out lots of info here, but I personally would not apply honey to a wound here in the Philippines because there is a good chance I would fall asleep and wake up covered in ants who are attracted to the honey.

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David_LivinginTalisay

Wow I didn't know that ice should not be used!

 

I also thought that the degree of a burn was related to the area as well as the depth of the burn.

 

It's very easy to get the classic "Philippine tattoo" which is a scar on your calf from touching a hot exhaust pipe.

 

I'm interested in what you mean by "rinsing/reverse flushing with solvent" in your description.

 

Hope your hand isn't too uncomfortable. Burns hurt.

 

ICE directly applied, can cause burns and stick to skin! It can be wrapped in cloth/plastic and applied, I was told?

 

The 'Severity' of the burn also applies to how much area is burned. Need Medical attention if large area, for sure.

 

 

2nd Degree Burns mean the top layer of Skin was damaged, so down to 2nd Layer.

3rd degree Burns nean the top 2 payers of skin were damaged and it down to the 3rd underlying tissue

 

I guess I also have a "Philippine tattoo" as my left calf did touch the engine casing, rather than the exhaust on GTR#6

 

I was wearing denim jeans, so not like it was bare skin against the engine casing. it felt a bit hot, but not unbearable (unlike the intense pain one experiences with bare skin on an exhaust pipe). I guess the heat penetrated the cotton, with the length of contact, and caused a burn on my calf.

 

My leg was up against my engine casing, when my wheel slipped on loose gravel going down hill I put both feet down, but bike was leaned over to the right, and with my asawa being on the back meant I could not get the bike back upright, until she got off. Had she shifted her body, so all her weight was on the left footpeg, it may have helped get the bike upright a lot quicker. My left leg was against the engine casing for over a minute!

 

 

 

 

I'm interested in what you mean by "rinsing/reverse flushing with solvent" in your description.

 

Off Topic really as I was discussing the BURN I got from changing my Engine Oil, not really how I changed my engine Oil. I only added that so someone else might not make that stupid, carless, mistake of not taking care with the exhaust being somewhat close to the engine guard mounting bolt.

 

Click 'Spoiler' for more 'Off Topic' reply

 

1605247830848080_3.jpg

That is the standard Oil Filter as fitted on Yamaha XT225 and is 'washable', meaning it can be reused if no damage to the very fine mesh screen.

 

2592442001_edf1891c77_o.jpg

 

As you can see from this photo I found on the Internet of an XT225 Oil Filter after it is removed, there is the metal and stuff the Oil Fllter stopped circulating in the engine and is on the outside.

 

You don't want any of this 'debri' on the inside, so I added solvent to wash such 'debri' (I had no where near that amount shown in his photo) from the INSIDE, so it flowed OUT, taking the particles with it into the catch pan.

 

So nothing to do with treatment of BURNS, just part of my explanation how I came to find myself getting carelessly burnt, after refitting cleaned Oil Filter and Oil Drain

 

 

Perhaps I should buy and install a Ricochet Skid Plate, as that allows one to drain oil without removing it (unlike the thinner, less sturdy Yamaha standard skid plate)!

ricologosm.gif

278s.jpg

Skid Plate (P/N 286)

XT/TTR225 1992-2007Made from 3/16' Aluminum

All Mounting Hardware Included

Click Here to view additional photos

278_1.jpg278_2.jpg

 

Pictures are of TW200 fitted with Ricochet Skid Plate, but shows how close the mounting bolts are to that exhaust, if you are not paying attention to possible danger!

Danger of getting burnt as it still very hot, more than 20 minutes after switching engine off, and having drained, cleaned Filters, refitted and added new Engine Oil.

 

77530693.jpg

Re: Magnetic Drain Plugs for the XT225 Mule

I charge $10.00 to do the modification plus $4.05 for 2-3 day Priority mail shipping. This includes the magnet/lock ring. The machining is free,

 

 

77532279.jpg

 

I also 'washed' with Solvent, the Oil Drain Plug 'strainer', but this somewhat easier to clean. That 'Neo' rare earth magnet Disc, modification helps collect any ferrous metal.

 

Cleaning with Gasoline has its own dangers, so better to use Paraffin!

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay

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Headshot

When I took first aid, I was taught that the reason to avoid actual ice on a burn, or any injury for that matter, is the potential for frostbite if you accidentally leave the ice touching one spot for too long. The flesh is already damaged and sensitive to cold as well as hot.

Well, they do watch to make sure the affected area isn't in the solution long enough to become hypothermic, although I'm not sure that frostbite is even a possiblity with an ice-water solution. It stays right at 0 degrees C, which really isn't cold enough to cause frostbite.

 

I personally would not apply honey to a wound here in the Philippines because there is a good chance I would fall asleep and wake up covered in ants who are attracted to the honey.

:biggrin_01::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

 

Yeah, I would have to agree with that one. The little buggers would be all over you in seconds.

Edited by Headshot

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David_LivinginTalisay

Just because raw honey is used in folk remedies doesn't make it a medical treatment. A lot of folk remedies here also involve the use of witch doctors. Personally, I would avoid putting honey on my skin (especially if the skin is injured). But, that's just me. Go ahead and try it if you want. I prefer to just eat honey (and sparingly at that).

 

 

 

I take it you did not bother clicking on that URL I included, and reading that Report which was Review of Clinical Reports and Experimental Studies for Honey as a Dressing for Wounds, Burns,and Ulcers

 

See http://pittsborohone...eals/grotte.pdf

Honey as a Dressing for Wounds, Burns,and Ulcers:

 

A Brief Review of Clinical Reports and Experimental Studies

 

Published in Primary Intention Vol 6, no. 4, December 1998;

P. C. Molan B.Sc.Ph.D.,

Honey Research Unit,

Department of Biological Sciences,

University ofWaikato,

Hamilton,

New Zealand,

 

Corresponding author:

Associate Professor P. C.Molan,

Department of Biological Sciences,

University of Waikato,

Private Bag3105,Hamilton,

New Zealand,

Telephone: +64 7 838 4325,

Fax: +64 7 838 4324

 

Summary

 

The use of honey as a wound dressing material, an ancient remedy that has been rediscovered, is becoming of increasing interest as more reports of its effectiveness arepublished. The clinical observations recorded are that infection is rapidly cleared,inflammation, swelling and pain are quickly reduced, odour is reduced, sloughing ofnecrotic tissue is induced, granulation and epithelialisation are hastened, and healingoccurs rapidly with minimal scarring.

 

The antimicrobial properties of honey prevent microbial growth in the moist healingenvironment created. Unlike other topical antiseptics, honey causes no tissue damage: inanimal studies it has been demonstrated histologically that it actually promotes thehealing process. It has a direct nutrient effect as well as drawing lymph out to the cells by osmosis.

 

The stimulation of healing may also be due to the acidity of honey. The osmosis creates asolution of honey in contact with the wound surface which prevents the dressing sticking,so there is no pain or tissue damage when dressings are changed. There is much anecdotal evidence to support its use, and randomised controlled clinical trials that have shown that honey is more effective than silver sulfadiazine and polyurethane film dressings(OpSite®) for the treatment of burns.

 

read more...

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay

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Headshot

I take it you did not bother clicking on that URL I included, and reading that Report

No...I read it. I also read in the main report, contradicting information that said you should NOT apply honey to open wounds. Like I said. I choose not to apply honey to skin injuries. If you wish to...be my guest.

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David_LivinginTalisay

No...I read it. I also read in the main report, contradicting information that said you should NOT apply honey to open wounds. Like I said. I choose not to apply honey to skin injuries. If you wish to...be my guest.

 

 

It is usual practice to treat all wounds prior to 'dressing' such wound.

 

hey just suggested open wounds should be cleaned, before applying 'Raw Honey', just like with any other ointment or whatever.

I used an Iodine Solution after the cold water - stings like hell, but works good.

 

Well I have put 'Raw Honey' (from street seller with Honey Combs) on my burns, so will see if the more recent burn to my left hand, heals up quicker and/or better than that burn to my left calf, over a week older?

 

I like the fact it seems to 'soften' the 'scabs', that helps stop them from cracking. and falling off - prolonging the healing process and could give 'scarring'.

 

It seems to get absorbed by the skin, so don't think I will find a load of ants feasting on the honey.

David

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rfm010

i probably shouldn't even mention this since my memory is dim on the details and i'm too lazy at the moment to google for more information, however, i do recall several years ago now hearing a report on the use of honey to fight infections. in particular, a medical center in the southwest u.s. that specialized in fighting infections was experimenting with the use of honey on infections that had been resistant to other treatments. the initial esults seemed to be quite good so researchers took things further by testing different types of honey. apparently there is a type of honey from australia that worked particularly well, although other types were also effective. the idea that certain types of honey worked better seemed to indicate that it wasn't the sugar in the honey but something else that was working. i don't know what results came after that report came out but i've always remembered it so that if i ever get a nasty infection i will try some honey. so far no luck in getting a nasty infection though...

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A_Simple_Man

. . . i do recall several years ago now hearing a report on the use of honey to fight infections. in particular, a medical center in the southwest u.s. that specialized in fighting infections was experimenting with the use of honey on infections that had been resistant to other treatments. the initial esults seemed to be quite good so researchers took things further by testing different types of honey. apparently there is a type of honey from australia that worked particularly well, although other types were also effective.

 

 

I heard about that. When an Aussie gets infection on his dick from a snakebite, he gets his Australian honey to suck out the poison. Heard it works really well.

 

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thebob

I wouldn't recommend following the advice of a single study, even peer reviewed, I'd wait until the study had been replicated a few times to make sure there were no procedural anomalies.

 

Here are some papers from pubmed

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=%20Honey%20burns

Edited by thebob

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loosehead

We use manuka honey the same way filipinos use papaya ointment to treat minor burns and abrasions. Both are effective.

 

I have seen some very good results from using manuka honey to treat difficult bedsores.

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