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Cebuano teacher wanted


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Regardless of how you learn to speak Cebuano the important thing is you try. For the most part the respect you get from the people will increase and they are delighted you are trying to learn. Not only that if you learn to speak a little you will pick out words you understand and have a rough idea of what is being said. Your wife or GirlFriend cannnot teach you even if they want to because they do not Know why the speak the way the do, because they themselves have never been taught Cebuano, so they have never learned the Grammar they just speak the way they learned in the homes and on the street and in school as I said they do not teach Cebuano in School. There they learn Filipino and English. Get a Teacher like Sem Villar or one of the other teachers who can explain the grammar to you. Be patient with youself because it will takes years to learn to be fluent. Sem says if you work on it 8 housrs a day and speak to ten people a day and learn 10 words aday you will be fluent in one year. So you woulod have to live breath and eat Cebuano to pull that off.. Just do not give up In my case I do not care how long it takes I am commited to learning. getting a REAL TEACHER WITH A TRACK RECORD IS WHAT IT WILL TAKE.

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Agreed. In your case, you are fortunate that your wife will help you learn. in my case, I was married to a worthless scammer who didn't want me to know, or learn anything that she was saying. So, during our nine years of marriage, I never learned anything.

 

I'll bet there are very few if any on this forum that haven't been through bad marriages or been taken advantage of by some soulless parasite. Finding someone who is genuine does more than make up for it though.

 

It is nice to just ask my wife what a word means rather than looking it up. We do speak to each other in both languages - I correct her English and she corrects my Cebuano. Her English is a lot better than my Bisayan tho.

 

I agree that to learn the language only a good teacher can show you how to build the foundation required to learn from.

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broden

Agreed. In your case, you are fortunate that your wife will help you learn. in my case, I was married to a worthless scammer who didn't want me to know, or learn anything that she was saying. So, during our nine years of marriage, I never learned anything.

obviously you learned something

just not what you were wanting to learn

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ancienrocka

I have been here for about 4 years now and had built up a vocabulary of well over 1,000 words and a string of useful phrases, but going to lessons with Sem was like learning to ride a bike, when for 4 days you keep falling off and then suddenly one day you can ride it.

 

I recommend him to anyone interested in learning - he makes each lesson entertaining and you learn so much about the local culture at the same time. The language is both amazingly simple and so very frustratingly difficult. The point that MOG makes about learning from your wife is valid though; my wife is learning about her language from my lessons as well as me.

Edited by ancienrocka
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  • 1 month later...
dc3driver

It's okay. I have found my old friend Sem Villar. A kind gentleman from Australia just rang me direct, and gave me Sem's current cell number. Peter, thank you so very much, sir, for your kindness and willingness to help.

 

Anyway, if anyone wishes to learn Cebuano, I can certainly recommend Sem as a TOP teacher. When I first decided to take lessons, he is who was recommended. He taught me in a 1.5 hour class every day, five days per week. We started at 5:30am and went until 7:00am daily. So, trust me, he is quite flexible.

 

I thank God above, for now having contact with SEM again.

 

I have his email address and cell number. I will give it to anyone who contacts me wanting it. I will not, however, post that information on the open forum.

 

I hope you boys are ready to learn, though, if you get SEM. Because you will have the guy you need for that plan.

 

Paul: Can you PM me Sem's contact info? thanks

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Paul

Did you get my PM? I sent it the day you requested it.

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dc3driver

Did you get my PM? I sent it the day you requested it.

 

Sure did!! Thanks, Paul

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Stranded Shipscook

One can learn it, if one is devoted to it and needs too.

 

I learned Taglish within one year when i was on my own in Manila and 25 years younger, came sort of automatically. Well, thats a long time ago and Taglish isn't very much alive anymore ( it used to be half/half actually)

 

Teacher is the best way. To learn it from a wife is hard, since it is too personal. Most people which speak fluent are fathers, and learned it in the time their kids learned it.

 

Some others bought dictionaries, there are fat ones in the National bookstore, very fat and expensive. The small pocket guides are a little rudimentary and often even wrong, cause written by Tagalogs or Foreigners.

 

First (for the english speakers among you) learn the correct latin/spanish pronunciation of the letters. English pronunciation of letters is actually WRONG, which leads to the often misunderstanding of the locals. if one can pronounce the letters correct, a major step has been taken. If one can not learn this, all effort is fruitless. Even a perfect formulated sentence will NOT be understood, if pronounced wrong.

 

Then you start learning the words and use with English sentences. (cebuanish) when confident with that, you can start replacing the English with Cebuano ones, then learn the complex grammar and put it in the right order. It's hard, because the grammar is based it is on a different system, so it appears "unlogical" in context to the Latin grammar we use.

( As you may note on my English, i use Latin grammar rules, since i am unfamiliar with the English complex grammar, lol )

 

After a while months.years... you are suddenly able to communicate.

 

Now, - if you are able to speak Visayan, DON'T LET ANYBODY KNOW IT and a whole new world of fun opens up to YOU.

 

It's hilarious ! :coffee:

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lazydays

Quote Geunther,

"DONT LET ANYBODY KNOW IT and a whole new world of fun opens up to YOU"

 

I can well imagine :stick_poke:

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  • 2 weeks later...

The problem with learning Cebuano as previously stated is that it is not largely a written language. Taught orally in many provinces from mother to children. The language has been co opted by English(previously Spanish) words and phrases so much, many younger Cebuano/Visayan speakers can't say things like "happy birthday" in their own language.

So how to learn it is very dependent on your goals. If you want to be fluent, you have a long road ahead. If, however, you want to learn enough to get by with Jeepneys, Market talk, and polite greetings and small talk, the best way in my opinion as an educator is to immerse your self in the culture and language. It is important, if nothing else, to know when people are talking about you and to understand some of what they are saying. Understanding the culture is most important.

 

Deep Cebuano has few English words and is fast disappearing. modern Cebu City Cebuano has lost most of the musicality of the provincial forms, and is full of slang, abbreviated words, and colloquial verb formations.

Tom Markam's treatise on Cebuano compiled in 2005 is a remarkable attempt to codify the dialect, but if you use it for everyday communication, perhaps you will be surprised that people won't understand you so well. Still it is worth downloading free to see various conventions and vocabulary.

 

Again I feel an academic approach may not be the best way to pursue your goal of learning the language.

If anyone would like to PM me for further advice or suggestions I would be happy to respond. I don't know exactly the forum policy on links etc, so I won't leave any here.

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Headshot

When I mentioned to my MIL that I was having a difficult time learning Cebuano, she said, "Don't worry. Your children will teach you." I can only hope that is true.

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SkyMan

Yes, of course, to learn any language fluently you will have a long road ahead. And whether you want to be fluent or just some phrases, immersion is best. And I think, if your goal is fluency, you really need a teacher who can explain the structure that you can fill later with more vocabulary. And you need to learn it without the shortcuts. Simple enough to use the shortcuts later after you understand what you are really saying.

 

A lot of expats don't understand why their wives cannot teach them Cebuano. It's like this, when you first went to kindergarten, could you speak English? Probably, So then why did you spend the next 13 years or more learning English? Probably within a couple years you could read and write and after that, who cares? But you still didn't 'know' the language. Most Cebuanos are in that place. They can speak it, read it, and write, but don't 'know' it.

 

Now, I've often heard it said that the problem with Cebuano is that it is only a spoken language. I don't think so, I've seen it written often and we have newspapers here in Cebuano right? The only problem is there is no governing body regulating the proper spelling or grammar rules, so it's a bit laissez-faire. Perhaps I'll send off a communique to Gwen and see if we can get such a body up.

 

As for Cebuano borrowing words from other languages, yes, so? Is there more than a tiny handful of languages on Earth that don't barrow words? Let's see...laissez-faire, communique, fiance, even garage for God's sake, the bastion of American maleness is a French word. I think even bastion has French origins. And of course many, many examples from other languages as well.

Edited by SkyMan
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Davaoeno

Yes, of course, to learn any language fluently you will have a long ahead. And whether you want to be fluent or just some phrases, immersion is best. And I think, if your goal is fluency, you really need a teacher who can explain the structure that you can fill later with more vocabulary. And you need to learn it without the shortcuts. Simple enough to use the shortcuts later after you understand what you are really saying.

 

A lot of expats don't understand why their wives cannot teach them Cebuano. It's like this, when you first went to kindergarten, could you speak English? Probably, So then why did you spend the next 13 years or more learning English? Probably within a couple years you could read and write and after that, who cares? But you still didn't 'know' the language. Most Cebuanos are in that place. They can speak it, read it, and write, but don't 'know' it.

 

Now, I've often heard it said that the problem with Cebuano is that it is only a spoken language. I don't think so, I've seen it written often and we have newspapers here in Cebuano right? The only problem is there is no governing body regulating the proper spelling or grammar rules, so it's a bit laissez-faire. Perhaps I'll send off a communique to Gwen and see if we can get such a body up.

 

As for Cebuano borrowing words from other languages, yes, so? Is there more than a tiny handful of languages on Earth that don't barrow words? Let's see...laissez-faire, communique, fiance, even garage for God's sake, the bastion of American maleness is a French word. I think even bastion has French origins. And of course many, many examples from other languages as well.

 

 

Just dont try using that argument in France or french canada !!!

 

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Yes, of course, to learn any language fluently you will have a long ahead. And whether you want to be fluent or just some phrases, immersion is best. And I think, if your goal is fluency, you really need a teacher who can explain the structure that you can fill later with more vocabulary. And you need to learn it without the shortcuts. Simple enough to use the shortcuts later after you understand what you are really saying.

 

A lot of expats don't understand why their wives cannot teach them Cebuano. It's like this, when you first went to kindergarten, could you speak English? Probably, So then why did you spend the next 13 years or more learning English? Probably within a couple years you could read and write and after that, who cares? But you still didn't 'know' the language. Most Cebuanos are in that place. They can speak it, read it, and write, but don't 'know' it.

 

Now, I've often heard it said that the problem with Cebuano is that it is only a spoken language. I don't think so, I've seen it written often and we have newspapers here in Cebuano right? The only problem is there is no governing body regulating the proper spelling or grammar rules, so it's a bit laissez-faire. Perhaps I'll send off a communique to Gwen and see if we can get such a body up.

 

As for Cebuano borrowing words from other languages, yes, so? Is there more than a tiny handful of languages on Earth that don't barrow words? Let's see...laissez-faire, communique, fiance, even garage for God's sake, the bastion of American maleness is a French word. I think even bastion has French origins. And of course many, many examples from other languages as well.

 

Co opted is a little different than borrowing words from another language, at least that was my intended meaning. All languages borrow words, but they do not necessarily lose their native expressions in the process. Code switching might be as better term, where speakers of two languages switch between the two while speaking.

 

Needing a teacher to explain the rules is certainly beneficial, as I said it depends on your goal how much academic structure in the abstract you need to absorb. Of course native speakers of English or any language acquire grammar structures through patterning as a child, and if you follow Noam Chomsky, we carry in ourselves the innate ability to develop language as part of our intelligence and sentient nature. Language is indeed culturally implicit. We speak from our culture base, experience and world view. 80% (or approximately) of face to face communication is actually non verbal, so cultural immersion is one of the best way in my opinion to acquire a language. Notice I said acquire, not learn. You can use the academic approach to learning grammar vocabulary etc. but if you can't articulate that knowledge., it has little use. You have to use it. Of course each person has his own way of learning, one or a combination of various approaches, there is not just one best way... your time frame and personal preference will determine that.

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Merely learning a couple hundred cebuano words is all that is needed for figuring out most conversations. That and developing an "ear" for the language can be done in a fairly short time. I enjoy listening to the cebuano radio talk shows and try to decipher their conversation.

Memorizing phrases from some phrase book is not hard. But unless you have someone teaching you proper enunciation, you will not be understood. You also will be laughed at more often than not.

My main reason for wanting formal teaching of the language is to be able to put together a question and have a native speaker understand me.

Immersion into the culture is a vital part of becoming fluent no doubt. Learning the formal language and then later picking up the street lingo makes most sense to me.

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