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First gynecologist visit?


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Paul

In a perfect world, a Doctor (ob-gyn) should be with you when a relationship between and man and a woman is "consummated".(in the same room would be best) He/she would evaluate, and coach the sexual behavior and performance of both parties, and that would reduce the number of future medical visits considerably. Should the male falter during the consummation, the Doctor could serve as backup!

 

This is to be taken seriously!

 

Mike, seeing how much I respect your views and insight, I would have taken that advice, had it been, well, sooner. However, it's a bit too late for that now, pal. :scratch_head:

 

--------------

 

I was asking, by the way, because I had never been with a virgin before.

 

However, I was with one once who claimed to be. But, that is another story for another time.

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HeyMike

So, I take it the virgin Connie Swells is no longer the virgin Connie Swells, huh? Back on topic.... sorry mate, have no advise on a first visit.

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miles-high

OK no MDs on the forum is answering your question so I called my OBGYN friend (thanks to free Skype)

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kumusta cebu

Hi Paul,

 

These are compress data hopefully it will help.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation from American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists:

 

1. Between the ages of 13 & 15 teens should attempt their first visit to their gynecologist.

 

Rationale is for education (foremost) & screening.

 

 

 

Screening examples are the following but are not limited to:

 

A. Monitor signs of reproductive disorders such as polycystic ovarian syndrome, which may lead to excessive weight gain, irregular cycles, hirsuitism and infertility problems.Early treatment can help reduce complications of other diseases including diabetes and hypertension. Education regarding sexually transmitted disease.Education in choices of contraception that is available in the market.

 

B. First visit may or may not include a complete pelvic exam or a Pap smear. (see notes below for Pap smear testing criteria & how it maybe inappropriately used)

 

 

 

Best practice: Treat a Gyn visit as an annual exam just like your own physical exam.

 

 

 

In a nutshell you may need to see a gyn more frequently if:

 

1. You have fibroids & it is becoming a problem

 

2. History of abnormal Pap smears or HPV visit could be every 4 or 6 months depending on how abnormal they are.

 

3. Are on oral contraceptives. Key word: Any time new birth control is started it is best practice to follow up 3 or 4 months to make sure it is working for the patient, monitor her blood pressure & weight; making sure that the contraceptives is not influencing these factors.

 

4. on hormone replacement therapy.

 

5. "Complicated gynecologic history"; meaning has extensive past medical, surgical & family history.

 

 

 

Most common reasons you might see your ob-gyn between annual exams include but not limited to:

 

You get pregnant or think you might be pregnant

 

You get a vaginal infection, pain around the vagina, or burning, swelling, itching, or discharge

 

You get a urinary tract infection or see any blood in the urine

 

You feel pelvic pain, like severe cramps or severe pain in the abdomen & this is a recurrent symptom not attributable to exercise or any other activity.

 

You experience abnormal vaginal bleeding

 

You feel any breast mass, including when you do a breast self-exam

 

 

 

Regarding HPV Vaccine:

 

There are a couple of opinions. Best approach is to be an informed consumer.

 

1. Fact: Pap smears are an effective screening tool to prevent cervical cancer. Pap smears alone prevent more cervical cancers than can the vaccines alone.

 

2. Gardasil & Cervarix:

 

Below is from the CDC Guidelines:

 

As of February 14, 2011, approximately 33 million doses of Gardasil were distributed in the U.S. Since February 14, 2011, VAERS received a total of 18,354 reports of adverse events following Gardasil vaccination in the U.S. Of these reports, 92% were reports of events considered to be non-serious,and 8% were reports of events considered serious.*

 

Based on all of the information we have today, CDC recommends HPV vaccination for the prevention of most types of cervical cancer.As with all approved vaccines, CDC and FDA will continue to closely monitor the safety of HPV vaccines. Any problems detected with these vaccines will be reported to health officials, healthcare providers, and the public and needed action will be taken to ensure the public's health and safety.

 

 

 

HPV (Human Papilloma Virus)Testing Criteria:

 

 

 

For patients age 30 years or older, HPV testing may be used as an adjunct screening test in conjunction with cervical cytology. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that a combination of screening cervical cytology and HPV testing leads to earlier detection of CIN-2,3 and cervical cancer compared with cervical cytology alone.(6)(7)(8) (EG 1) The negative predictive value of a negative HPV test combined with a normal cervical cytology is 99% to 100% for patients age 30 years or older. Therefore, when results of both HPV and cervical cytology are negative, continued screening at 3-year intervals is recommended for this age group.(3)(5) (EG 2)

 

HPV testing is indicated for patients age 21 years or older when cervical cytology or cervical biopsy results are abnormal.(1)(2)(3) (EG 2)

 

Results from a randomized trial on the management of ASC-US,the ASCUS-LSIL Triage Study (ALTS) group, indicated that the risk of CIN-2,3 is the same in patients 21 years or older with either LSIL or ASC-US with positive HPV; therefore, both groups should be managed identically.(1) (EG 2)

 

HPV testing is not recommended for a patient younger than 21 years with LSIL, and if it was inappropriately performed, the results should not change management.(1)(9) (EG 2)

 

Testing for persistent HPV infection following treatment for CIN identifies patients at risk for recurrence.(12)(13)(14)(15) (EG 2)

 

Cited References: KitchenerHC, et al. HPV testing in combination with liquid-based cytology in primarycervical screening : a randomised controlled trial. Lancet Oncology2009;10(7):672-82. DOI: 10.1016/S1470-2045(09)70156-1. View abstract... ACOGPractice Bulletin No. 99: management of abnormal cervical cytology and histology. Obstetrics and Gynecology 2008;112(6):1419-44. DOI:10.1097/AOG.0b013e318192497c. View abstract.. Bais AG, et al. Post-treatmentCIN: randomised clinical trial using hrHPV testing for prediction ofresidual/recurrent disease. International Journal of Cancer 2009;124(4):889-95.DOI: 10.1002/ijc.23824. View abstract...

 

 

 

Inappropriate Use Human PapillomaVirus (HPV) Testing

 

Most HPV infections are transient, especially in patients younger than 30 years, with the highest clearance of virus and resolution of abnormal cervical cytology and CIN biopsy lesions in patients younger than 21 years. For this reason, HPV testing is not recommended for patients younger than 21 years.(1)(2)(3)(9) (EG 2)

 

Cited Reference: Wright TC,Massad LS, Dunton CJ, Spitzer M, Wilkinson EJ, Solomon D. 2006 consensusguidelines for the management of women with abnormal cervical screening tests.Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease 2007;11(4):201-22. DOI:10.1097/LGT.0b013e3181585870.

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Baywak

You may need to see an OB-Gyne more often---if you see and Ob-Gyne.

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AngelofBroden

Correct!

 

As soon as the girl/woman starts having sex, she should see a gynecologist every year for PAP screen to make sure that she doesn't have PID (pelvic inflammatory disease caused by sexually transmitted infections/diseases that Guenther mentioned. A woman who has never had sex still needs to see a gynecologist (men are not the only ones responsible for women's health problems, hahah), as hormonal problems, tumors, infections that are not caused by sexual activities can still occur. The gynecologists check for any abnormalities of the uterus and ovaries, and normally do breast exam. It's to prevent all these diseases that a woman needs to see her gynecologist. Here in the U.S. this can be done by her GP so she won't have to go to a gynecologist.

 

Any girl should visit an "OB Gyne" with the onset of her period.

 

Any girl should visit an Ob gyne with her first sexual contacts.

 

Any woman should visit an Ob gyne at least annually.

 

Most infections are symptonless, but all lead to sever troubles. And they can be aquired without SEX.

 

Chlamydia

 

 

Trichomoniasis

 

 

Thrush

 

 

Genital warts

 

 

Genital herpes

 

 

Bacterial vaginosis

 

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KeithAngel

Congratulations Paul thats the second Engagement this week :broden:

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broden

so anyway Paul are you going to take her to the same Gynecologist you use?

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  • 4 months later...
tom_shor

Hopefully you got some useful information from this Paul.

 

Congratulations I think. :unsure:

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The visit went well. She was scared, but went with a friend, rather than me. I think we are both happier about that. :unsure:

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tom_shor

The visit went well. She was scared, but went with a friend, rather than me. I think we are both happier about that. :taz:

 

Gee Why? :unsure:

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deanfarmer62

I can't answer last time i was at the GYNO they told me to wait in the lobby......and put my cloths back on. I thought it was darn rude

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2. Gardasil & Cervarix:

 

Below is from the CDC Guidelines:

 

As of February 14, 2011, approximately 33 million doses of Gardasil were distributed in the U.S. Since February 14, 2011, VAERS received a total of 18,354 reports of adverse events following Gardasil vaccination in the U.S. Of these reports, 92% were reports of events considered to be non-serious,and 8% were reports of events considered serious.*

 

Based on all of the information we have today, CDC recommends HPV vaccination for the prevention of most types of cervical cancer.As with all approved vaccines, CDC and FDA will continue to closely monitor the safety of HPV vaccines. Any problems detected with these vaccines will be reported to health officials, healthcare providers, and the public and needed action will be taken to ensure the public's health and safety.

 

 

I appreciate the info in Kumusta's thorough post, as well as the Guenther's and others above. I do hope to be a daddy again, and have never raised daughters before. Seeing some of these concerns now with a gf's daughter, seeing how quickly puberty and related issues arise.

 

But I would add that anyone suggesting HPV or genital wart inoculation, should point out that it is totally untested. We don't know if it will cause sterility in these girls years later.

 

The argument is, well so many women are sexually active in their youth, that even a percentage of girls getting warts etc from vaccination is okay, because it prevents a lot more. That may be true for certain populations - e.g., non-church-going city dwellers in the U.S., Europe, and Africa, who grow up without a father (for example). It is NOT true (for example) for many churchgoing girls in small towns in Latin America and the Philippines, who grow up with a father present in the home. So a father may be exposing a daughter to MORE risk, not less, if you get her inoculated with this new, untested - and highly promoted - vaccine.

 

That is, IF you are raising your daughter with values that include virginity until marriage, and relatively early marriage.

 

I realize that many loving fathers want their daughters to go to college, start a career, and experience life before marriage. Those fathers are not the ones I am addressing here. No disrespect intended.

 

Btw, I happened, a couple of years ago, to see a minor one-time news item, that HPV vaccination was being REQUIRED of teenage Mexican girls re-entering the U.S. from Mexico with their families. The U.S. was funding this. It looked to me like a meek, compliant, trusting, and administratively controllable population was being used for beta testing, and corporate profit.

 

Next, I learned that teenage girls on Medicaid or MediCal here in California were being given the vaccine. A benefit for the poor? Or something else?

 

Poorer countries, and dark-skinned people have occasionally been treated negligently before. There was the horrendous Tuskegee experiment, of course. But there are also apallingly slipshod vaccination practices by NGO's in Africa that have spread disease. And Bill Gates spoke approvingly about intentionally using inoculation to reduce birthrates and population. And we do know that several nations have worked on race-specific or gene-specific bio-weapons. (Who knows why?)

 

I'm sure that 97% of folks at CDC are great people doing great work. But what about the other 3%? What about the ones who also consult for the military and hold secret clearances?

 

The bottom line is, I wouldn't blindly trust a daughter's reproductive health to The Man. I would question everything, especially things made by for-profit corporations, which are then highly promoted by NGO's. Especially if the daughter was from a country where the majority is brown-skinned or poor.

 

Hike

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Um, this thread was about my g/f's first GYN visit, as she was virgin when we first met.

 

Since this question has been answered, and since this topic has gone on another tangent, I will close it now.

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