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insikmania

cheap siberian husky or hybrid

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insikmania

is anyone here would help me where to find a cheaper price of a siberian husky?

you can contact me via email [email protected] or txt me XXXXXXXXXX.

thanks in advance...

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shadow

Huskys are not a popular breed here, possibly due to their short lifespan due to weather they are not designed to endure. Finding a "cheap" one may be difficult.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

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Headshot

I saw huskies at an IRO-sponsored event up at the University of the Philippines, but I have no idea who is breeding them. I did see a sign by the road up in Compestela advertising husky puppies for sale, but no price was given. It seems to me that keeping a husky in this climate is pretty close to cruelty to animals unless they stay in an air conditioned space. The ones I saw at the IRO event certainly didn't look all that comfortable. They must shed like crazy here.

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Bob Ward

Must be a troll?

 

Edit!

 

Sorry, I was rude! BUT why in the hell would anyone want to raise a dog here in this heat that clearly can not cope! It is cruel in my book!

Edited by Bob Ward

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Forefall

Check istorya.net.. not here.

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broden

not the type of dog i'd have in the RP and though there is nothing wrong with price shopping, buying from a breeder just for a cheap price, well you get what you pay for and likely help support further bad breeding practices not to mention how the dogs are otherwise kept and raised

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hey joe

I have had two huskies over my lifetime here in the United States, but I would NEVER have a husky in the Philippines because they are not at all suited to the climate and it would really be close to cruelty to animals to have one here (unless they are mostly in an airconditioned climate inside a house, and a husky is really not designed by nature to be inside a house the majority of the time). Perhaps you could try a different breed of dog that has been successfully raised in the Philippines by others and has demonstrated adaptability and resultant compatibility with the tropical climate. Just food for thought......... :cooking::welcome2::cooking:

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billten

Try cebu-dogs. Be prepared to pay P35 to 50 thousand, minimum, and unless you give the dog a aircon home, it will not live past 5 or 6 years old.

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SkyMan

I wonder if it would be cruel to bring/have a huskey here. It seems logical the big coat would fry them but I wonder if that is correct. I personaly would never wear so much as a jacket here but I see locals wearing cammo field jackets and nearly parka type insulated coats out on scooters all the time. Perhaps the heavy coat would protect the dog from heat as well as it does against cold? My x talked me out of bringing my German Shepherd here saying the same things, cruel to have him in a hot place like this, etc. I didn't agree but I didn't relish the shipping expense so I let her have him and now he's with my daughter and doing fine. When I found a shepherd breeder here I bought one and he's doing great here though a little crazy because he has to go another month before I can start walking him again.

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Cipro

What if you shave them? No, it's not a joke.

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broden

not being an expert in that specific breed though i'm sure it wouldn't be all that difficult to find some online to talk to

here would be a good start

http://www.akc.org/club_search/index_master.cfm?action=refresh_index&active_tab_row_A=1&active_tab_col_A=1&fixed_tab=1&club_id=710

 

it's not just their coat that would be an issue for them but countless generations of breeding that would have to be overcome to give them the ability to deal with the climate. and that would in my mind if done make them a whole new branch of the breed. but the years and years it would take to get to that point would not be the best treatment for all the generations of dogs leading up to it.

 

by all means though talk to some actual experts on the breed. not just one or two breeders, even local ones. and surely not just the cheapest guy on the block. talk to some people who will have no money to be made and only have the best interest of the dog and the breed in mind

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Jess Bartone

There is a common misconception that dogs with heavy coats cannot tolerate heat. This discussion was had here about a year ago. I don't know about huskys, but on the edge of the Australian desert Maremma Italian sheep dogs are used to protect sheep from marauding hybrid domestic X dingo mongrel bastard dogs. They have been monitored by the RSPCA, and they are thriving. And it seems the poor defenceless creatures they protect have rather a heavy coat too... in temperatures approaching 50oC.

 

Having said that, to come on a forum and make a solitary post asking for a "cheap" and apparently unsuitable dog is just ridiculous.

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skippy

Have you been drinking ?

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Cipro

Having said that, to come on a forum and make a solitary post asking for a "cheap" and apparently unsuitable dog is just ridiculous.

 

 

Good point on the heavy coat of sheep though, they are after all about the same size, quite well insulated, and mammals. I wonder if they share the cooling limitations dogs seem to have. It never occurred to me that people could raise sheep for wool in very hot weather.

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Jess Bartone

Good point on the heavy coat of sheep though, they are after all about the same size, quite well insulated, and mammals. I wonder if they share the cooling limitations dogs seem to have. It never occurred to me that people could raise sheep for wool in very hot weather.

 

Perhaps the only (domestic) animal hardier than a sheep is a feral goat, which strangely enough are usually found in the same areas as sheep. Sheep are grown in three zones, high-rainfall zone, wheat-sheep zone, and pastoral zone. I cannot see any reason why heavy coated Maremmas cannot thrive wherever sheep do.

 

prod_sheep.gif

 

The pastoral zone is semi-desert arid areas which make up most of Australia. The next map shows the main pastoral areas sheep are grown. From about the middle of the map up is tropical, and the lower reaches of the pastoral zone are still bloody hot.

 

sheep_p.gif

 

Here is an excerpt from a sheep farmer in Hughenden, QLD. Type that into Google Earth and you'll see it's well up into the tropical area and also inland on the edge of the arid plains. It's a Microsoft Word document about protection animals, including Llamas and donkeys, which can be found here www.leadingsheep.com.au/predator.doc.

 

Maremmas atDunluce, Hughenden

 

By Ninian & Ann Stewart-Moore

 

Dunluce is a 46500ha sheep and cattle property 36km west of Hughenden in the Flinders Shire in North West Qld,and is owned by Ninian & Ann Stewart-Moore. It is predominantly open Mitchell grass downs with some timbered Boree country along the Flinders River which forms the northern boundary. Immediately to the north of the Flinders are basalt outcrops and plateaus which provide perfect cover for wild dogs.

 

By 2002, with no immediate neighbours running sheep, a less than successful 1080 program going on, and dingoes attacking their sheep almost nightly, Ninian & Ann began to consider getting out of the sheep industry altogether. They felt that they either had to do something different or getout, as being faced with fresh maulings on a regular basis was not something they wanted to be responsible for.

 

They had heard about stock guarding dogs, and Maremmas in particular, and decided to investigate the concept. It started with Google and ended up with them heading to Victoria to purchase 24 Maremmas, already bonded to sheep and ready to work.

 

After 3 years the annual losses had gone from above 15% down to an acceptable 3% (mostly from natural causes), and Ninian & Ann believe the actual number of sheep killed by wild dogs now to be minimal (There are still plenty of dingoes around). After 6 years they believe they now have the best protected flock of sheep in Western Qld and would welcome in good spirit any challengers to that claim. They can drive past a mob of sheep late in the afternoon, see a Maremma or two out there with them, and go home and have a good night's sleep.

 

The main protection that the Maremmas give is that they occupy the territory. All dogs are territorial, that was the problem in the past, they would get rid of one lot of wild dogs and the next week there would be new ones in their place. Maremmas are nocturnal by habit and have a loud, deep bark. No evidence of altercations with wild dogs has been observed.

 

There are a number of essential elements to the success of running livestock protection dogs:

 

  • All problems are solved by successful bonding of the dogs to the livestock that need to be protected, including lambs, calves etc. This process ideally starts as soon as the pups' eyes are open and continues until around 7 months when they are mature enough to desex and be put out to work.

 

  • Do not; do not use entire males or females in a free range situation. Keep any breeding stock under control near the house. Not only is there a risk of interbreeding, there are no other unwanted distractions and there are no downside effects.

 

  • It is also essential to be absolutely sure of the pedigree of any dogs purchased. A half breed Maremma will look like a Maremma and have very confused and undesirable instincts.

 

  • Do not over humanise pups as they are growing up, they will tend to want to come home to be with you and leave their stock unprotected.

It is a fine balance of being able to handle them when needed, whilst allowing them to be with theirlivestock as a priority.

 

  • Young dogs must be monitored during the first 12 months, to ensure they do not become too playful with their charges.

 

Ninian & Ann believe there is a huge role for using livestock protection dogs in the grazing industry now, for protecting both sheep and cattle, but it has to be done correctly or it will not work effectively.

 

 

 

 

 

Husbandry:

 

Good husbandry for the Maremmas issimple but essential.

 

  • Portable feeding stations that deny access to ruminants with ad lib dog biscuits are located near stock watering points. Meat (not sheepmeat) is taken on weekly water runs when available.
  • Worming is carried out twice a year at crutching and shearing time.
  • Toenails may have to be clipped depending on the type of country at these times also.
  • Occasional clipping of particularly matted hair is required, but mostly there is very little problem with their coats.
Edited by Jesse

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RickyL

Do not shave a Husky. They will be more vulnerable to insects and especially sunburn. Their coat insulates them from heat as well as cold. A dog like that would need to acclimatize over a period of 3 or 4 weeks. Expect very heavy shedding.

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shadow

Do not shave a Husky. They will be more vulnerable to insects and especially sunburn. Their coat insulates them from heat as well as cold. A dog like that would need to acclimatize over a period of 3 or 4 weeks. Expect very heavy shedding.

 

 

3 or 4 weeks? It took me 3 to 4 years before I started to acclimatize, and I don't wear a 3 kilo fur coat.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

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m60man

Bad choice.....the word Siberian should clue you to climate the dog thrives in! There are a few here, but they are surely miserable. Find yourself a native dog. I have one and it appreciates a good home where its not the entree.....she is smart, protective and loyal.....what more could you ask for in a dog. Plus there are thousands of them roaming around for free.....save one! You'll be glad you did. :)

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broden

Do not shave a Husky. They will be more vulnerable to insects and especially sunburn. Their coat insulates them from heat as well as cold. A dog like that would need to acclimatize over a period of 3 or 4 weeks. Expect very heavy shedding.

 

 

3 or 4 weeks? It took me 3 to 4 years before I started to acclimatize, and I don't wear a 3 kilo fur coat.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

i haven't worn a coat in years and years the occasional swearshirt or hoodie is about it and rarely at that, my wife will wear a coat in the middle of summer at times. there's a lot more to it than hair

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cdpino

Which large breed dogs, who are good watch dogs but also good with the kids they are bonded to, thrive in Cebu?

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Baldy

I will for sure look into the Thai Ridgeback when I become a permanent.

 

I dont know why, I just love em, have never met one yet tho...

 

How weird are the "feather" ones, hu? Cool breed imo. :)

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billten

Many of you know that i have been breeding doberman here in Cebu for a few years and several of the members have one of my dogs. My dogs are big and fast and work hard for their owners as a real form of home and family protection. They are great with the family and kids that they know well (i personally have 6 dogs and 3 kids under 10), but they will rip into anything that comes into their home that they do not recognize. This includes other family uninvited members ;-) This is the perspective from which i am answering, please note, i am not talking about pampered house dogs that live inside an aircon house and only go out to pee.

 

Before coming to Cebu i trained GSD PPD dogs and had them almost exclusively throughout my life. Once i got here i started looking at the GSD available here and how they live. What i found was that the long, dual coated style of dogs are available and living here, they just are very small and skinny and they don't live very well or very long. The average life span for a GSD here is about 6 or perhaps 7, in the west 10 to 14 is common. The short coated dogs like doberman are not afflicted in the same way. So anyhow, to make a long story short, i decided to breed doberman and have happy dogs that can thrive in this climate rather than longer coated GSD that can survive but are likely to die early and uncomfortably.

 

The OP asked about the huskey or malamute style of dog, I know of a breeder in Labangon, his dogs are very expensive, because he has to baby them to allow them to live, they only survive a short time and their breeding cycle is often interrupted.

 

So, if you bring a dog that is designed for the arctic to live in the tropics... WHAT DO YOU EXPECT????

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Headshot

Do not shave a Husky. They will be more vulnerable to insects and especially sunburn. Their coat insulates them from heat as well as cold. A dog like that would need to acclimatize over a period of 3 or 4 weeks. Expect very heavy shedding.

 

 

3 or 4 weeks? It took me 3 to 4 years before I started to acclimatize, and I don't wear a 3 kilo fur coat.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

Yeah, but you've still done a bit of shedding...on top. :stick_poke:

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shadow

Do not shave a Husky. They will be more vulnerable to insects and especially sunburn. Their coat insulates them from heat as well as cold. A dog like that would need to acclimatize over a period of 3 or 4 weeks. Expect very heavy shedding.

 

 

3 or 4 weeks? It took me 3 to 4 years before I started to acclimatize, and I don't wear a 3 kilo fur coat.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

Yeah, but you've still done a bit of shedding...on top. :huh_01:

 

 

I'm not shedding, I'm "gravitationally challenged"!

 

;)

 

Larry in Dumaguete

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Baldy

Many of you know that i have been breeding doberman here in Cebu for a few years and several of the members have one of my dogs. My dogs are big and fast and work hard for their owners as a real form of home and family protection. They are great with the family and kids that they know well (i personally have 6 dogs and 3 kids under 10), but they will rip into anything that comes into their home that they do not recognize. This includes other family uninvited members ;-) This is the perspective from which i am answering, please note, i am not talking about pampered house dogs that live inside an aircon house and only go out to pee.

 

Before coming to Cebu i trained GSD PPD dogs and had them almost exclusively throughout my life. Once i got here i started looking at the GSD available here and how they live. What i found was that the long, dual coated style of dogs are available and living here, they just are very small and skinny and they don't live very well or very long. The average life span for a GSD here is about 6 or perhaps 7, in the west 10 to 14 is common. The short coated dogs like doberman are not afflicted in the same way. So anyhow, to make a long story short, i decided to breed doberman and have happy dogs that can thrive in this climate rather than longer coated GSD that can survive but are likely to die early and uncomfortably.

 

The OP asked about the huskey or malamute style of dog, I know of a breeder in Labangon, his dogs are very expensive, because he has to baby them to allow them to live, they only survive a short time and their breeding cycle is often interrupted.

 

So, if you bring a dog that is designed for the arctic to live in the tropics... WHAT DO YOU EXPECT????

 

Just a question, if You consider to keep the Dobberman breed in Cebu, would you keep 1 or 2 dogs, if 2, what gender?

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