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RP has highest power rates in the world


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QUOTE: where are you getting your info .. or is it just common knowledge of power rates across the globe?

ANSWER: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_pricing I assume/ hope they are correct!

 

QUOTE: don't compare the Philippines to the wealthiest countries in the world, that deliver good infrastructure to the inhabitants, be they citizens or not. Philippines is one of the poorest countries in the world. It's not Norway, which is unimaginably richer, or even Iran, which is only much richer.

ANSWER: The article posted states "MANILA, Philippines - The Philippines, which ranks among the most corrupt countries, also holds the unenviable record of having the highest residential power rates not only in Asia but in the entire world."

The entire world means just that and therefore the newspaper statement is wrong and again puts the Philippines in a bad light again, but unfairly this time!

Mr. Whippy, I think they ask you to contribute towards the power bill because your well known benevolent reputation precedes you! rofl.gif LOL

 

Cheers..

 

Well Its a very interesting table, but the important thing to understand is how much of the total bill is based on standing charges, and the marginal cost of an extra kwh.

 

The quoted figures are very high for a kwh, but not when you factor in the standing charges.

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JamesMusslewhite

James;

 

Are you being sarcastic?:biggrin_01:

 

 

I guess we pay the highest rates for their excellent services rendered. Those 8 hour daily rolling blackouts for 6 months, before the elections, was such an enjoyment. I am so happy that they have now decided to continue these special services, to now include 12 hour blackouts ever other Sunday.

 

I am so happy when I pay an inflated monthly rate while receiving only 2 weeks worth of electricity. After all it would be unthinkable that the Electric Conglomerates may lose revenue for services they did not provide their customers, in fact it is after all understandable that they charge their customers more a month then if they had supplied those two weeks that made up the month. They after all are only thinking of us, we are so special. :notallthere:

As the day is long. :biggrin_01:

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shadow

We pay a very small percentage of what I paid typically in the US. In the US, my electric bill was often $400+, here, our electric bill averages out to about $6/month.

 

We pay 5.5 KW per hour, (just a tad less than the P18 quoted, does ANYONE pay P18?) We get P800 rebate on each meter's monthly bill. (We have two meters, one for welding shop, one for house) We do not have or need AC as we live in a relatively cool area. Last year we paid out a total of around P3000, for the year!

 

I do understand that most of you pay considerably more than this, but I repeat, does any here Pay P18 PKWH?

 

Maybe this article is not quite accurate as a guideline to go by?

 

Larry in Dumaguete

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One of my major annoyances is the electricity bills. Todays bill is 11,964.40 php from VECO for 20th Jan to 19th Feb. Billed kWh 1420, Avg kW per day 47.33.

The bit I hate is the system loss charge of 1084.88 php............

My bills are a lot lower then they were, but I can't really bring it down any further without causing discomfort to the kids and myself. We run 2 wall unit AC's pretty much 24/7, several fans, laptops, computers, a water pump, water heater, reef etc. The AC is obviously expensive, but the water pump is a nightmare, would be a lot cheaper to be supplied water and pay water rates!!!

 

Man that is really expensive. Those wall unit aircons must really suck the juice. I have a large house in aussie (240 square metres) with ducted climate control (aircon/heating) to all rooms and I pay 20% less than you.

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My wife paid the electric bill this morning,

it was 9 pesos per kw/h..... or 21 cents..... but that's all she has to pay.

my last bill was 19.25 cents per kw/h..... however once I paid $36.00 service to property charge, $17.68 metering charges and $18.63 GST. It translates into 32 cents per kw/h.....

I know which rate I would rather pay..

Our city here in south Florida has its own antiquated power company. We pay 18 cents per KWH and we lose power 13 times per year on average. My utility bill is between $400 and $575 per month.

 

wow I though I was paying too much until I read this thread. That's expensive man. Lot's of expats live on that money in the Philippines.

 

I pay $230 per month and we have only lost power once briefly in the last 15 years. Many of our friends with no kids in the house only pay $100 per month.

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dablindfrog

One of my major annoyances is the electricity bills. Todays bill is 11,964.40 php ............

......We run 2 wall unit AC's pretty much 24/7, several fans, laptops, computers, a water pump, water heater, reef etc. The AC is obviously expensive, but the water pump is a nightmare, would be a lot cheaper to be supplied water and pay water rates!!!

 

 

When I lived in Cebu, we also had high electricity bills until our maid suggested switching the water heater off when not needing it.

The bills dropped significantly.

 

 

Do the Philippines use these?

250px-Pretty_flamingos_-_geograph.org.uk_-_578705.jpg

 

 

 

 

my wife said the same thing and would UN plug the tv every time she left the room well it needs to heat up to work and so after unplugging it 100 times the frigging thing broke and cost 9,000p to fix... now i dont allow anyone to unplug anything without telling me first..

 

hah, glad i wasn't just the one asshole here, i even had to duct tape some plugs to the sockets for them not to magically unplug themselves, that came after the Post-it with "don't unplug" clearly became inefficient.....

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washingtonian88

Well, at least the RP is #1 at something.

 

My blood boils everytime I get my electric bill so just to heck with it, I decided to deposit P10k, as advance payment to VECO since PNB online still does not do online payment for VECO, and it's just more trouble of a monhtly errand. Of course, this doesn't make me win... but how do you win on this anyway?- not use any electricity...ewwww, can't do.

I have a Metrobank account. It's only purpose is to pay VECO and my wife's SSS.

 

 

I thought about opening a Metrobank or UnionBank so I can pay my VECO bill online.

I was told that I should soon be able to pay online too with PNB...

Oh well....

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We pay a very small percentage of what I paid typically in the US. In the US, my electric bill was often $400+, here, our electric bill averages out to about $6/month.

 

We pay 5.5 KW per hour, (just a tad less than the P18 quoted, does ANYONE pay P18?) We get P800 rebate on each meter's monthly bill. (We have two meters, one for welding shop, one for house) We do not have or need AC as we live in a relatively cool area. Last year we paid out a total of around P3000, for the year!

 

I do understand that most of you pay considerably more than this, but I repeat, does any here Pay P18 PKWH?

 

Maybe this article is not quite accurate as a guideline to go by?

 

Larry in Dumaguete

 

My bill in Oregon was $250+ US prior to my campaign to simplify my life and concentrate on rebuilding my retirement after the ex-wife cleaned me out. Now it's $40 a month. A lot of the cost of living depends on how one insists on living.

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My wife paid the electric bill this morning,

it was 9 pesos per kw/h..... or 21 cents..... but that's all she has to pay.

my last bill was 19.25 cents per kw/h..... however once I paid $36.00 service to property charge, $17.68 metering charges and $18.63 GST. It translates into 32 cents per kw/h.....

I know which rate I would rather pay..

Our city here in south Florida has its own antiquated power company. We pay 18 cents per KWH and we lose power 13 times per year on average. My utility bill is between $400 and $575 per month.

 

wow, I thought I was paying higher than anyone. Last month was $396, month before was $512.. Your house has the same insulation as mine.. (smile)

 

(edit) .11/KH

Edited by booger10
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My wife paid the electric bill this morning,

it was 9 pesos per kw/h..... or 21 cents..... but that's all she has to pay.

my last bill was 19.25 cents per kw/h..... however once I paid $36.00 service to property charge, $17.68 metering charges and $18.63 GST. It translates into 32 cents per kw/h.....

I know which rate I would rather pay..

Our city here in south Florida has its own antiquated power company. We pay 18 cents per KWH and we lose power 13 times per year on average. My utility bill is between $400 and $575 per month.

 

wow, I thought I was paying higher than anyone. Last month was $396, month before was $512.. Your house has the same insulation as mine.. (smile)

 

(edit) .11/KH

 

Well it's probably not a big deal in sunny FL but in Oregon I was coughing up $250+ for electric and that wasn't cooking, heat or warm water. My gas bill also ran between $150 and $200 and the house was one of David_Living_InDreamlands ICF super insulated houses to boot.

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  • 3 weeks later...

18 cents is cheap, if i was paying that here in turks and caicos i would be laughing. we are at 45cent per kw and rising

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littlejohn

18 cents is cheap, if i was paying that here in turks and caicos i would be laughing. we are at 45cent per kw and rising

 

 

You should look into getting a good diesel generator I'm relatively certain it would save you money and be more reliable. That is if you can fork out a grand or two for a decent one.

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Stranded Shipscook

You should look into getting a good diesel generator I'm relatively certain it would save you money and be more reliable. That is if you can fork out a grand or two for a decent one.

 

The "Balamban Enerzone" has studied this possibility with heavy fuel generators for the Shipyard and export zone here and came to the conclusion that it is about 30% more expensive than the Cebeco 3 public power grid. (Coal and peak diesel)

 

This takes into consideration the investments and maintenance over a 10 year period. Longer periods become even more unattractive due to replacement of the generator engines.

 

They now focus on Power storage for the occasional "black-out" periods. Balamban has very few in comparison to Cebu City, about 1 per month for 20 minutes and once in a while a 3 hour one for maintenance and upgrading purpose, mostly at weekend nights.

 

The power rate per Kw/h is also less. total costs for 430-450 kw/month between 3000 to 3300 peso including Basic cost.

 

Power rates are really very varying in the Philippines. Most headline reports are based upon more expensive Cityprices. That includes the Wiki links.

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udonthani

The power rate per Kw/h is also less. total costs for 430-450 kw/month between 3000 to 3300 peso including Basic cost.

Power rates are really very varying in the Philippines. Most headline reports are based upon more expensive Cityprices. That includes the Wiki links.

 

they vary for sure, but only rich people like you think that this is not all that important. Normal people, i.e. not the freako foreigners, have to seriously consider whether it's worth getting another appliance. They have to think about whether it's worth the running cost, and whether they can afford it. Electricity is horrendously expensive in the Philippines compared to average earnings.

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Stranded Shipscook

they vary for sure, but only rich people like you think that this is not all that important. Normal people, i.e. not the freako foreigners, have to seriously consider whether it's worth getting another appliance. They have to think about whether it's worth the running cost, and whether they can afford it. Electricity is horrendously expensive in the Philippines compared to average earnings.

 

me rich? I am the poorest sucker on this entire forum, LOL. :biggrin_01: funny

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