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dyanisis

how much to build a pumpboat

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Davolives

Just out of curiousity, why is it called a "pump" boat? I've often wondered what they mean by it. It's a banca or a parau. I can't see any connection with a "pump" on board. Thanks for all your info. Been dreaming about having one myself.

 

 

Maybe ????? Smaller pump boats might be powered by the sort of small single-cylinder engine which might be used to drive a water pump

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fanboat

My boat was built in caccar

 

17 footer

 

11 hp honda no damn muffler bamboo stearing like driving a tempermental race car liked to dive into the swell if not careful

she was moored among many boats and the builder kept an eye on her for me.

 

p50000

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morak8088

IMO you are better off building your own boat. I checked out boatshop philippines and didn't like what I saw. He charges $9.50 per man-hour for labor and I'll bet his workers don't receive half that. Plus there's a 15-25% markup for materials and contracted services. Sure, it's cheaper than paying to have your boat built in the States but I think you'd derive more satisfaction (and lower production costs) if you built your boat yourself.

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Stranded Shipscook

Just out of curiousity, why is it called a "pump" boat? I've often wondered what they mean by it. It's a banca or a parau. I can't see any connection with a "pump" on board. Thanks for all your info. Been dreaming about having one myself.

 

because fisherman sometimes are making love in them :rofl:

 

No, serious now. It comes from the pumping movement when they pump water into the engine cooling circulation with the help of a bamboo mechanism..it comes in handy also whent he waterpump breaks down, then they do it all the way manually. in the old days they did not even had engine waterpumps so one guy was aways pumping.

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Rogersea

So Dyanisis did you ever have one built??

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JamesMusslewhite

Many variables and cost differences must be considered. Quality of woods. epoxy, sealants, primers, paints, lights, motor, and accessories. If one wants a solid hull bottom or just plywood, gas motor or diesel. I have purchased to hulls that I am presently restoring, one is a 34' plywood construct pumpboat and the other is a 32' heavy-hull plywood construct calamari fishing boat. I paid 6,000p for the 34' pumpboat and 10,000 for the 32' fishing boat, both without motors. I have a 9 horse for the pumpboat and will purchase a 24horse diesel for the fishing boat .

 

I have seen 18-24 footers sell for 10-15,000p with motors being sold by locals, but I want to insure the quality of materials and strength of the inner frame. I will probably have 35-45,000p invested per boat by the end of the project. That does not include motors, generator, depth finder, water surface lights, underwater lights. ropes, and rigs. The 24 horse diesel can cost as much as 36,000p depending on brand and model, they are more expensive than gas units but diesel is much safer to store on a boat and diesel have overall savings on fuel consumption maintenance cost..

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HTM

What is the price if you use aluminum?

Does anyone have experience with building of aluminum boats here in the Philippines?

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D-man

we are looking for a banca(pump boat) but do not want to spend more than p50-60k. Anyone know of anything would like 30'.

thanks

Dalles

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Bill H

I just stumbled onto this thread, so I'm jumping in late. A few observations: Plywood here is really, really bad. I did a boil test on the local "marine" plywood and it totally fell apart in about 2 hours. Normally you'd like it to go 36 to 48 hours. On the other hand it's cheap. The most reliable brand here is called "tuff ply" but it's not widely available. The primary souce in Cebu is Vic's. The hard woods available here are very good, a relatively inexpensive, but they are all green. It's hard to find dry wood, so I've ended up buying my wood months in advance for the boats I'm building in order to get the moisture content down to 12% which is higher than I'd like but a whale of a lot better than the 70% I frequently start with. As soon as I move to our new site, I intend to build a solar kiln to shorten my drying time to just a few weeks and get the wood to less than 10%.

 

A gasoline motor made in China here can be had for less than 10,000p and it might last a few months if you're lucky. I bought a 12hp diesel China made motor and the recoil starter failed on the 4th use. Such is the quality of made in China products here. Triple the cost to get a Honda, Briggs or other name brand motor. I'm not convinced the extra money that a diesel costs for these boats is worth it. Yes, diesel is safer, but there are relatively few fires on these boats and they are generally just not used very much, so I think the better way to go is gasoline at this juncture.

 

Choose your builder very carefully. Many of the locals don't use much epoxy glue and do little to prevent dry rot of the solid wood in the boat. The also tend to use regular wood screws which will rust out quickly, but they cost a lot less than the stainless steel screws or bronze screws that should be used in any boat building project. A solid wood bottom is guaranteed to be a marine borer magnet and will look like swiss cheese in a year. Most of the epoxy I've seen used here is to fill the borer holes in the bottom of the boat. When I started building boats here the local Pioneer distributor didn't even know his company made laminating epoxy! Getting them to order it for me has been a real chore. Such is the reality of getting things done here most of the time. I will have about 22,000p in materials in my current boat project by the time it's finished, give or take a couple thousand. The prop and motor will cost a little less than that, but I'm using a lot of epoxy and only stainless steel fasteners throughout the boat, so my costs are higher. Every joint in my boat is both epoxied and fastened with screws and I laminated the bottom out of three layers of 3/8" plywood.

 

Regards,

 

Bill

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Runian

What is the price if you use aluminum?

Does anyone have experience with building of aluminum boats here in the Philippines?

I guess cos after you have done all the investing in presses and welders and all that, no can afford it. maybe cos there are 10 000 builders making them on the beach ?

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roskillos

I guess cos after you have done all the investing in presses and welders and all that, no can afford it. maybe cos there are 10 000 builders making them on the beach ?

 

im new here. a friend of mine and I build boats using steel. send me a message if you are interested. if you can show me pictures or design of what you have in mind, that would be great.

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roskillos

I just stumbled onto this thread, so I'm jumping in late. A few observations: Plywood here is really, really bad. I did a boil test on the local "marine" plywood and it totally fell apart in about 2 hours. Normally you'd like it to go 36 to 48 hours. On the other hand it's cheap. The most reliable brand here is called "tuff ply" but it's not widely available. The primary souce in Cebu is Vic's. The hard woods available here are very good, a relatively inexpensive, but they are all green. It's hard to find dry wood, so I've ended up buying my wood months in advance for the boats I'm building in order to get the moisture content down to 12% which is higher than I'd like but a whale of a lot better than the 70% I frequently start with. As soon as I move to our new site, I intend to build a solar kiln to shorten my drying time to just a few weeks and get the wood to less than 10%.

 

Choose your builder very carefully. Many of the locals don't use much epoxy glue and do little to prevent dry rot of the solid wood in the boat. The also tend to use regular wood screws which will rust out quickly, but they cost a lot less than the stainless steel screws or bronze screws that should be used in any boat building project. A solid wood bottom is guaranteed to be a marine borer magnet and will look like swiss cheese in a year. Most of the epoxy I've seen used here is to fill the borer holes in the bottom of the boat. When I started building boats here the local Pioneer distributor didn't even know his company made laminating epoxy! Getting them to order it for me has been a real chore. Such is the reality of getting things done here most of the time. I will have about 22,000p in materials in my current boat project by the time it's finished, give or take a couple thousand. The prop and motor will cost a little less than that, but I'm using a lot of epoxy and only stainless steel fasteners throughout the boat, so my costs are higher. Every joint in my boat is both epoxied and fastened with screws and I laminated the bottom out of three layers of 3/8" plywood.

 

Regards,

 

Bill

 

hey bill,

 

you seem to have a lot of experience. have you finished any boats before? i am considering having a boat made. perhaps you can help. could i get your email so i can send you the design?

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