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udonthani

potatoes

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Headshot

Potatoes in the Philippines are allmost entirely imported, at least in Cebu

And even if they would be not, the distributors orientate their prices at world market prices.

Potatos have been grown in the Philippines since the late 16th century, when they were imported by the Spanish from South America. Since potatos like a bit cooler weather, you will generally find them being grown up in the mountains. The are even grown in the mountains of Cebu. We even found a place up by Mt. Manunggal where they grow strawberries, so it is plenty cool enough for potatos. A lot of the mountainous areas in the Philippines have a cloud forest climate, which is ideal for potatos.

 

I understand about how the distributors price things. I'm just saying there is no real reason for it.

Edited by Headshot

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Terp

I hadn't gone to the market in a couple of months but when I do I always buy potatos.

 

In the past I could get them for around 45 per kilo.

 

Anyway last week I went to the market, the first vendor I went to tried to charge me 115 per kilo. I laughed and walked away thinking to myself she must think I'm stupid. Went to another stall and the sales lady said 105.

 

Now I'm thinking this isn't right, I only paid 45 a couple months ago, they must be in on scamming me together.

 

Finally got another vendor down to 95, bought half a kilo and got on my bike a drove away all the time thinking man I got ripped off.

 

So yes it appears the prices have gone up and I don't feel as dumb now [grin].

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Bob Ward

I hadn't gone to the market in a couple of months but when I do I always buy potatos.

 

In the past I could get them for around 45 per kilo.

 

Anyway last week I went to the market, the first vendor I went to tried to charge me 115 per kilo. I laughed and walked away thinking to myself she must think I'm stupid. Went to another stall and the sales lady said 105.

 

Now I'm thinking this isn't right, I only paid 45 a couple months ago, they must be in on scamming me together.

 

Finally got another vendor down to 95, bought half a kilo and got on my bike a drove away all the time thinking man I got ripped off.

 

So yes it appears the prices have gone up and I don't feel as dumb now [grin].

 

Should be a temporary hike in price due to all the rain we have had, it hampers harvesting!!!

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udonthani

just bit the bullet and shelled out 47 pesos for some at 80/kilo.

 

seeing as I spent 38 on a potato peeler not so long ago, it would be pretty dumb if I didn't utilise it.

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questsea73

Hi: I wonder where the potatoes are being imported from if this is true?? I had problems in Thailand also 9 years ago; only decent potatoes were those bought in fast food outlets as "french fries". Ones we bought at Chiangmai(even at day market where fruit/vegs were dirt cheap in quantity had high prices on potatoes. These potatoes tasted fair if made properly but were full of grass/ or other growths thoughout much of many of the potatoes. Quite a chore to peel and clean them for cooking. Ken

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Bob Ward

Hi: I wonder where the potatoes are being imported from if this is true??

 

China

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Turbota

I am no potato expert to say the least, but I would bet money that those little dinky 2" and 3" potatos they sell here are all local.

 

I every once in awhile see the larger potatos like you would find in any grocery store in the US. My bet is that those are imported to here.

 

I am convinced that growing potatos, white or yellow onions and celery is pretty much a waste of time here ... Those little dinky yellow onions (about 1/3 the size) of the yellow onions they sell in the US aren't the best, but much better than the local 1" to 2" redish purple colored onions all the locals buy here. I bought some of those local little red onions once and mixed then up in the ground beef for hamburgers ... too strong and ruined the taste of the hamburgers. Never again with those local purple onions.

 

And the celery you find here looks malnurished to say the least! Not even worth buying.

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easy44

I am no potato expert to say the least, but I would bet money that those little dinky 2" and 3" potatos they sell here are all local.

 

I every once in awhile see the larger potatos like you would find in any grocery store in the US. My bet is that those are imported to here.

 

I am convinced that growing potatos, white or yellow onions and celery is pretty much a waste of time here ... Those little dinky yellow onions (about 1/3 the size) of the yellow onions they sell in the US aren't the best, but much better than the local 1" to 2" redish purple colored onions all the locals buy here. I bought some of those local little red onions once and mixed then up in the ground beef for hamburgers ... too strong and ruined the taste of the hamburgers. Never again with those local purple onions.

 

And the celery you find here looks malnurished to say the least! Not even worth buying.

Yeah but when I moved here in 2001 you couldn't even find celery. So we're moving in the right direction.

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Stranded Shipscook

Hi: I wonder where the potatoes are being imported from if this is true??

 

China

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JamesMusslewhite

Problem is an agricultural area droughts then potatoes are small and few per parent plant, and if the area floods they rot in the ground. My suggestion is to get a clean recycled food-safe 55gal plastic drum and cut in half, this makes two 22-1/2gal planters. drill plenty of drainage holes in the bottom and lower sides. This both allows excessive water and moisture to adequately drain and allows aeration. This oxidation allows for productive root growth, assist over all parent plants health, and helps combat systemic root rot. Then fill 4 inches of fine stones or aggregate in the bottom of the containers, this also allows better consistent overall drainage and aeration. Fill containers to 80% capacity with enriched top soil, potato root development is enhanced by adding lots of compost and loose material into the soil. That's why I like a mix of 1/3 course sand (mason) and 2/3 compost and or mulch. When preparing your soil, add additional compost, straw, and other amendments (such as eggshells, tea and coffee grounds) down three to six inches into your soil. Place these containers onto three tiles of blocks allowing air to pass under the containers. This helps both drainage and aeration while assisting to minimize insect infestation in the container's soil or excessive staining on deck surfaces.

 

Next find potatoes that are developing eyes. Cut potatoes that have sprouted eyes into 2" to 4" cubes, it is best to have two or more well-established eyes per cube. For best success with the overall production of the cubed potato eyes, place into a paper or plastic bag and add 1 tsp. of powdered sulfur and shake well. This will help prevent the fungus or bacteria which cause scab and rotting once planted. Plant cut potatoes 2 to 6 inches deep, eyes up. As plants emerge, add enough soil to keep any growing exposed potatoes covered. Water in well and allow to slightly dry between watering, best to maintain moderate moisture in the soil. Once again to allow proper drainage and oxidation in the soil. You will able to harvest from 40 to 50 pounds of potatoes from a single mulch filled barrel containing 2 or 3 parent plants. When ready to harvest a container just dump barrel halves, then refill soil and replant. This also works for Onions, chives, radishes, yams, turnips, beets, carrots, and with most all subsoil vegetable production. This can be done easily on patios areas, balconies, and even roof tops. Happy gardening. :D

 

Fertilization can be done using composted manure teas and emulsified fish (fish emulsion). The manure teas allow a great source of natural nitrates and assist the soil's continuing composting process bu helping feed the plant and soil microorganisms. The fish emulsion does much the same but also contains 4% iron, which induces type-A chlorophyll to the parent plant.

 

Note: White potatoes are best if you desire them to be fried in oils, they will fry crispier than yellow potatoes. Yellow potatoes tend to soak up more of the cooking oils.

Edited by JamesMusslewhite

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Guest Otokan

My girlfriend in Cebu City is trying to grow a few plants in the shade at her parents' house on an experimental basis.This is where my horticulture training comes in handy, though I've never grown anything in a zone 9 region. So If this doesn't work, we'll try the container thing. I've found here in the states that adding a goodly quantity of lump charcoal (I make it at home), I have doubled the potato yield in my garden. I'm not sure if it will work in the tropics, and I'm not sure how it works, but it just does here.

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udonthani

well if it consistently gets above about 125 a kilo, and stays there, you'll be laughing. Good luck with the enterprise, bauer.

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Stranded Shipscook

Good news is, that potatoes are not like the oil prices, they are now back to normal levels. 40- 55 peso per Kg for good quality.

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