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Adventures in Timberland


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Earlier this week, Aber Crabnasty (my builder's LinC username here) staked-out the footprint for our house and garage so I thought this would be a good time to start a thread to document the build.

 

As some of you will recall me mentioning, our house will be what Americans call a "framed house" and what we Brits refer to as "timber-frame" but there will be some novel features which will make this house somewhat unique in a Philippine setting but perfectly normal for western eyes. Timber as a constructional material makes a good deal of sense here as its "R" Factor (heat retention) is much better than either solid concrete or concrete block. Termites - and other wood borers - are a nuisance that can be managed without too much effort.

 

Here are the rough design drawings for what we want to achieve, there will, I'm sure, be changes made as we proceed with the build but both Mike (Aber Crabnasty) and I have agreed on this design:

 

 

 

 

Some words of explanation. The front of the house is at the bottom of the drawings and the "front door" is located at the left side. I have a lot that is a parallelogram with the long side running parallel to a Barangay road running east-west giving a frontage of 49 metres. The shorter dimension, 31 metres, is 15 degrees off-square. The house is sited such that the "front door" points towards the road but the front of the house has an uninterrupted view across a valley and Mount Apo away in the distance. As you go through the front door, there's a wide circular staircase on your right and cloakroom and CR on your left. In front of you, a wide passageway leads to the main living room with doors off to the office, kitchen and storage room.

 

I have never been a fan of "open plan" living accommodation which is why the kitchen, dining and living rooms are three separate rooms. From external door from the Utility/Laundry room, there's a ten foot covered walkway to a 20'x24' open-sided garage and the area between the garage and house used as a "kitchen garden". The final 8' of the dining room end of the garage will be double-block wall enclosure for a generator and our water pump.

 

The upper floor layout is similar to the ground floor. Originally we planned for a large picture window above the entrance porch to create a light and airy feel but have had to modify our plan to make use of that space - the reason is rather obvious! However that room will be constructed in such a way that the wall with the door and the wall above the staircase can be removed and this latter wall will be replaced by a railing. That will recreate the light and airy feel of my original design.

 

Our planned "unique touches" include cast concrete window sills (made with white cement) for the exterior and mahogany sills on the inside. The main roof will be "hip" type, with a 6:12 pitch, rather than the ubiquitous gables. Unfortunately clay tiles would be too heavy so we'll be using asphalt shingles.

 

I will be adding to this thread over the coming weeks and months documenting our progress with photos.

 

 

 

Mark

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SkyMan

You are definitely a fan of hallways and doors. Keep us posted so how it goes.

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how come the downstairs s 21 x 48 feet and the upstairs is 24 x 48 feet, just an observation correct me if im wrong,

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Very interesting, I look forward to the progress reports. Are you considering solar panels etc? Here in NZ most houses are wood framed and very popular. Good luck!

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I have a few comments

 

 

Kitchen:

If I should arrange a kitchen I would have table space on both sides the gas range (stove)

also I would want table space at least at one side the refrigerator

 

Bathroom at master bedroom:

I would move the bathtub to the "north" wall, move sink in front of the window and the toilet to the wall where bathtub is now. Maybe use a sliding door to the bathroom. Also have a cabinet there for clean towels etc

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Looks good Mark. It's not clear to me where someone using ther downstairs WC would wash their hands. I know you don't favour open plan but using one of those new style sliding concertina doors between the dining and living rooms would give you the option when we all turn up for a party. I look forward to following progress of the build.

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Looks very nice! Well done!

 

Just a few little comments. Make sure you convert all the dimensions to metric for the locals. Probably not a big deal, but the standard local door sizes are 600mm, 700mm, 800mm, 900mm, and 1000mm, so keep that in mind when converting. You may want that door to the ground floor cr (wc) smaller...no more than 700mm (or even 600mm), as you don't have much room there. Maybe you could get rid of the cloak room and extend the cr?

 

Are you sure you're okay with the 2nd and 3rd bedrooms being a little on the skinny side? 2.7 metres seems a bit small. But on the other hand, I've seen Filipino style houses with 2.2 metres!

 

That's a good remark about the top floor being bigger than the ground floor.

 

Andrew

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how come the downstairs s 21 x 48 feet and the upstairs is 24 x 48 feet, just an observation correct me if im wrong,

 

The ground floor IS 24, if you add the number up it is = 24, I enlarged the view and it is not a 1, it is some dots missing a 4

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broden

Mark you should put it in to some software that allows for a 3D walk through

i believe google sketch up does

 

best of luck for a quick and painless build

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I do not see Bob's room! Damn it Jim! Just how many cloaks do you have for a room that size? Cheers!

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Julian C Thong

Well done Mark! Design is an ongoing feast and a few good comments have been made so I'll not bother other than saying have a few corners to distract the eye. Do you have fenshui (spelling?) person down you way? Always worth while as usually good food for thought.

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Question? did you or your builder read the latest fire code of the Phils:

 

It states:

 

Curved Stairs:

 

Curved stairs shall be permitted as a component in a means of egress, provided that the depth of the thread is not less than two hundred eighty millimeters (280mm) at a point three hundred five millimeters (305 mm) from the narrowest end of the thread and the smallest radius is not less than twice the stair width.

 

 

Ur stair radius is only slightly over half the stair width.

 

PM me ur email add and I will send you a pdf file. Perhaps it can be posted in the forum for member reference.

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Thank you everyone for you comments so far!

how come the downstairs s 21 x 48 feet and the upstairs is 24 x 48 feet, just an observation correct me if im wrong,

It's not, the dimension for the downstairs width isn't too clear but is 24 feet.

 

Are you considering solar panels etc?

I did consider solar panels but it's simply too expensive and there's no real likelihood of ever getting to the position where your electricity is free. Deep-cycle batteries are hugely expensive (over PHP 8000 for a 50Ah unit from a mediocre manufacturer) and need to be replaced at least three-yearly and even the best solar panels have a lifespan of less than twenty years or so. Nice idea but it doesn't fly unfortunately.

 

 

Looks good Mark. It's not clear to me where someone using ther downstairs WC would wash their hands. I know you don't favour open plan but using one of those new style sliding concertina doors between the dining and living rooms would give you the option when we all turn up for a party. I look forward to following progress of the build.

The downstairs "WC" will have a wash basin and towel rack. I did think of using bi-fold doors between the living and dining rooms but getting the necessary hardware is a problem. Party? PARTY?! Did someone say "Party"??!!

 

Looks very nice! Well done!

 

Just a few little comments. Make sure you convert all the dimensions to metric for the locals. Probably not a big deal, but the standard local door sizes are 600mm, 700mm, 800mm, 900mm, and 1000mm, so keep that in mind when converting. You may want that door to the ground floor cr (wc) smaller...no more than 700mm (or even 600mm), as you don't have much room there. Maybe you could get rid of the cloak room and extend the cr?

 

Are you sure you're okay with the 2nd and 3rd bedrooms being a little on the skinny side? 2.7 metres seems a bit small. But on the other hand, I've seen Filipino style houses with 2.2 metres!

Good points well made, thanks Andrew!

 

Question? did you or your builder read the latest fire code of the Phils:

 

It states:

 

Curved Stairs:

 

Curved stairs shall be permitted as a component in a means of egress, provided that the depth of the thread is not less than two hundred eighty millimeters (280mm) at a point three hundred five millimeters (305 mm) from the narrowest end of the thread and the smallest radius is not less than twice the stair width.

 

 

Ur stair radius is only slightly over half the stair width.

 

PM me ur email add and I will send you a pdf file. Perhaps it can be posted in the forum for member reference.

Thanks Bet - I think! :offtopic: I'm sure you mean "tread width" otherwise the requirement doesn't make any sense!

 

In all seriousness, that requirement would rule-out curved or circular stair cases in most domestic settings as the space requirement is too big.

 

 

Mark

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Question? did you or your builder read the latest fire code of the Phils:

 

It states:

 

Curved Stairs:

 

Curved stairs shall be permitted as a component in a means of egress, provided that the depth of the thread is not less than two hundred eighty millimeters (280mm) at a point three hundred five millimeters (305 mm) from the narrowest end of the thread and the smallest radius is not less than twice the stair width.

 

 

Ur stair radius is only slightly over half the stair width.

 

PM me ur email add and I will send you a pdf file. Perhaps it can be posted in the forum for member reference.

Thanks Bet - I think! :offtopic: I'm sure you mean "tread width" otherwise the requirement doesn't make any sense!

 

In all seriousness, that requirement would rule-out curved or circular stair cases in most domestic settings as the space requirement is too big.

 

 

Mark

 

 

 

 

Mark, I think he's referring to the Philippine fire code. I don't have a copy, but I seem to remember when scanning through it, some information about stairs. Yeah, the 2 x stair width for the inner radius rule seems excessive.When you get your Architect to draw up the final plans, he he'll check that everything meets Philippine Fire and building codes.

 

When are you looking at building? Dying to see what the outside looks like!

 

 

Andrew

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