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udonthani

Philippines night ferry tips

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Topper

Thank you to all who took the time to post some helpful and lifesaving information when taking a ferry. I will be using them quite a bit come January, and who knows, it might just save our lives in the event of shipwreck.

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Davaoeno

They did a show on Myth Busters where they built a machine that you were strapped into and it then moved in the same way as if on a ship in rough water. They did it in order to test out different sea sickness remedies. They tried commercial products, metal wrist bands, and ginger. The only thing that worked well was the ginger !!

 

here are a few tips for seasickness -

 

Buy those tablets in any pharmacy against motionsickness, the ones based upon gingerextracts are the best, because the dont make you tired and dizzy.

 

If you cant by them, you can try to eat Ginger, either u make candies or pure or you can brew a Gingertea beforehand.

 

try not to worry too much, most motionsickness is psychologically.

 

Keep the meals light an healthy, avoid acids and anything to upset the stomach. Crackers and water is usually nice.

Or eat nothing.

 

if you are caught seasick or feel uneasy, try fresh air and get orientation pojnts at the horizon, keep yourself busy watching stars and other vessels or so. There is not much you can do when you are sick already.

 

if you are really really sick, don't go to the shipside to trow up, unless someone to hold you is with you, most man-over-board happen because of vomiting or urinating passengers. That is no joke.

Ask the crew to assist you if you have too.

 

There are a lot of other tips, such as wearing an eyepatch like a pirate, clogging up one ear and the likes, some of them worke for one, some not. But in the 21st century the pills are usually the best.

 

One example- when we travelled on the SAR004 to Palawan, all 30 Coastguard auxiliary guests took those tablets, only 2 got sick.

 

One the way back, none took the pills and 28 got sick. Weather conditions were the same

 

Little side remarks, the crew of the ship had a 50/50 rate of seasickness, so even Seaman get sick, so there is no shame in it.

The poor bastard just had no pills due to budget restrictions.

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Art

 

The air-con vent in a suite or state room usually is adjustable. However, I do not know of any suite or stateroom I have stayed on board in, that was able to be closed off completely. So, I'm not sure about the "fumes", as I have never experienced them on board.

 

I do know, though, that when traveling in a suite or state room, I was able to get a great nights rest, a good shower in the morning, and had security (my own locking door) so I could leave my bags and other personal things unattended.

 

Oh, I never travel on board a boat by myself. I hate sleeping alone, period.

 

The room I used that time was the center one with no windows I didn't see any vents, it was like being in a big metal box I didn't feel comfortable knowing of the dangers in ferry travel. The next trip I got a side room with window ports. I find the aircons in the Philippines a little too cold and always use the lowest settings. I like company but I prefer to sleep alone. Sleeping time is sleeping time when you get a little older you will understand that. :thumbsup:

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Mr. Mike

Outstanding thread and great information :thumbsup:

 

I am ordering my international orange "blowup doll" today! :thumbsup:

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SkyMan

I have to agree with whippy on bringing your own food. Beer, well, I get one of those priced NASTY CANNED beers on board and I lose the taste for it and don't want another so I actually save money that way. I'f I couldn't live without it I'd bring a flat of Tanduay and a cold 2 liter of Coke or whatever.

 

I have to agree with Paul about the stateroom particulary on a Cebu-Manila or vice versa ferry. In fact, well planned the ferry can save you money big time. Last year coming back from the US I needed to get from Manila to Cebu. I flew into Manila 1st class and maximum bags at maximum weight. Taking PAL or Cebu Pacific would have cost mega money. I had my witfe get a CP ticket to Manila to meet me for about p600 and I got a stateroom on the Super Ferry during their Todo Todo sale so it was about p2500 for the both of us. The ferries don't have weight limits like the airlines so I saved a lot that way. For those with families or groups, the price for the state room is for 2 people but it sleeps 4 so you can buy a state room and a couple of the cheapest tickets and they can stay in your room with you.

 

1st thing to do after securing your place on teh ferry is to locate the lifejackets and try them on if you can. Even on the short ferries like Bato, Cebu to Tampi, Negros Oriental.

 

2nd thing is to check the weather out before you board. Don't assume the captain is being cautious enough. I'd say this applies to airplanes too.

Edited by SkyMan

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Cebuned

Whippy if you took a blow up doll you would save the expense of maintaining a girlfriend or finding a one-nighter.

LMFAO,

 

OMG, I can picture it now. Ferry sinks, and after days of sea search only one servivor if found. You guessed it, "Whippy", floating on his blow up doll, and still plugged in even...LMAO

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BaniladBadBoy

Great thread/info. I've been through extensive training in the military and civilian arenas of ship safety/evacs. This included helicopter egress drills in underwater simulators. In bad weather I'd rather be topside close to an exit.

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Stranded Shipscook

Great thread/info. I've been through extensive training in the military and civilian arenas of ship safety/evacs. This included helicopter egress drills in underwater simulators. In bad weather I'd rather be topside close to an exit.

 

sounds like someone we can use in the Philippine Coastguard Auxiliary.. interested ?

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udonthani

In bad weather I'd rather be topside close to an exit.

 

the only time I was really worried re safety on a ferry was on an obviously overloaded ferry from Santa Fe Bantayan to Hagnaya a couple of years ago, there'd been high winds the day before and all boats were cancelled, therefore next day demand was high and the terminal was packed with customers - only the weather wasn't all that much better.

 

had it just been me I would have left it for a few days, but my girl at the time had to be back at work at Mizumi the next day and just couldn't wait. I insisted we sit on deck aned definitely not down below with our lifebelts ready just in case.

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Stranded Shipscook

In bad weather I'd rather be topside close to an exit.

 

the only time I was really worried re safety on a ferry was on an obviously overloaded ferry from Santa Fe Bantayan to Hagnaya a couple of years ago, there'd been high winds the day before and all boats were cancelled, therefore next day demand was high and the terminal was packed with customers - only the weather wasn't all that much better.

 

had it just been me I would have left it for a few days, but my girl at the time had to be back at work at Mizumi the next day and just couldn't wait. I insisted we sit on deck aned definitely not down below with our lifebelts ready just in case.

 

defintely the right thing to do, i just hope the situation had improved lately, i mean the overloading.

 

if you or anybody here faces overloaded ferries, please contact me, because those complaints will eventually lead to a better situation.

I post something soon how everybody can help.

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Ricky

The problem is whether the lifeboats and liferafts are operable, and whether the crew are properly trained to launch the equipment for you. I've sailed with a lot of ex crew and officers from the interisland ferries who eventually come onto the cruise ships. In the initial training I have been left astounded by the completely lack of understanding and knowledge amongst these guys.

Some years back, I recall two female bartenders joining, who'd been on the interisland ferries and held a 'Certificate of Proficiency in Survival Craft' and the Mustering system automatically assigned them as Boat Commanders. We commenced a boat drill the following day, and in a rush I barked at everyone to get into te boats lowered into the water, do a few laps of the harbour and then we'd pick the boats back up one by one. The boat with the new bartenders came back severely damaged after colliding into the ships hull at full speed (8 knots... ) and eventually had to send the 3rd Officer to go and help them recover it. Once I had a chance to speak to the girls later on, they said that they'd received the CPSC certificate without ever actually going near a boat and had simple attended a few days seminar in Manila! Since then i've been a lot more cautious with who is in command of these boats.

 

The system is pretty flawed, and having been onboard one of the ferries, I will never ever step foot on one again and wouldn't allow my family to. I have more confidence in the aviation industry here then the ferries, and thats saying something!

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State Trooper

I'd like to add that you can upgrade after the ship sails.......But ask to speak to the Chief Steward in person. He will be able to negotiate a better price for you. Ive done that often on my trips from Cebu to Nasipit and vice versa. For example I buy tourist and upgrade to Suite for P300

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BaniladBadBoy

Great thread/info. I've been through extensive training in the military and civilian arenas of ship safety/evacs. This included helicopter egress drills in underwater simulators. In bad weather I'd rather be topside close to an exit.

 

sounds like someone we can use in the Philippine Coastguard Auxiliary.. interested ?

 

I'd rather be a pirate. tongue.gif Seriously though, when I get there next year I'll contact you. It sounds like a lot of fun......except for picking up dead bodies.

 

 

Semper Fi,

 

Wesley

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Stranded Shipscook

The problem is whether the lifeboats and liferafts are operable, and whether the crew are properly trained to launch the equipment for you. I've sailed with a lot of ex crew and officers from the interisland ferries who eventually come onto the cruise ships. In the initial training I have been left astounded by the completely lack of understanding and knowledge amongst these guys.

Some years back, I recall two female bartenders joining, who'd been on the interisland ferries and held a 'Certificate of Proficiency in Survival Craft' and the Mustering system automatically assigned them as Boat Commanders. We commenced a boat drill the following day, and in a rush I barked at everyone to get into te boats lowered into the water, do a few laps of the harbour and then we'd pick the boats back up one by one. The boat with the new bartenders came back severely damaged after colliding into the ships hull at full speed (8 knots... ) and eventually had to send the 3rd Officer to go and help them recover it. Once I had a chance to speak to the girls later on, they said that they'd received the CPSC certificate without ever actually going near a boat and had simple attended a few days seminar in Manila! Since then i've been a lot more cautious with who is in command of these boats.

 

The system is pretty flawed, and having been onboard one of the ferries, I will never ever step foot on one again and wouldn't allow my family to. I have more confidence in the aviation industry here then the ferries, and thats saying something!

 

I agree with you Ricky,

i had all my basic certificates redone in 2006 to 2007, at a 'renowned" University here.

 

The SOLAS course was "ok", except that the teacher left the room at the exams (purposely) but in general one could say, if willing, a newbie could learn.

Passing rate about 95 percent, 3 guys had to come back on a weekend seminar and then were promised to get their certs...

 

The Proficiency course.. - biggest joke i ever experiences. We boarded a display Life Boat in groups and were told how it works. I understood all,because the labels and instructions in this boat were all in German. However, the actual mandatory training was in a row boat. so we rowed up and down a channel and that's it. Lots of FUN though !! Passing rate 100 %

 

Advanced firefighting - i tell you, everybody on that course is dead and the ship is lost ! Again- lots of FUN !! Passing rate 100 %

 

Medic/First Aid- now, that was actually ok, but it was done by a reg. Nurse which really wanted us to learn something. No FUN there !! and some people did not pass !!

 

Deck watchkeeping - half/half because we had 2 instructors and one was obviously very strict. passing rate 100% again because the exams were taken by the "friendly" instructor.

 

In reality and after having a conversation with some of the faculty staff they said, they are lenient in those courses because all off those students have already undergone the years of nautical study and are all grads, the few which are not from the university (like me) are all professional seaman already and know all..(!!!!)

 

Great- i may not be the smartest, but i could NOT pass a SOLAS Exam standby without the prior refreshing lessons.

For the non mariners here- it is a bit like a drivers license exam, who could honestly answer all questions correctly after 10 years...you get the point.

 

It is very sad. :-(

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Stranded Shipscook

Great thread/info. I've been through extensive training in the military and civilian arenas of ship safety/evacs. This included helicopter egress drills in underwater simulators. In bad weather I'd rather be topside close to an exit.

 

sounds like someone we can use in the Philippine Coastguard Auxiliary.. interested ?

 

I'd rather be a pirate. tongue.gif Seriously though, when I get there next year I'll contact you. It sounds like a lot of fun......except for picking up dead bodies.

 

 

Semper Fi,

 

Wesley

 

hehehe... ur welcome. The dead body part is only for the owners of boats and (Thank GOD) does not happen often. things have improved drastically in the last few years and there is hope..

 

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