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Euro change


ArieBombarie

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ArieBombarie

family is not used to changing in Cebu and neither am I, SM changers had 55 peso for a euro today that seems a bit low considering it is sort of 57,5

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sm dept. store is really low when it comes in other currency while in US$ they quite fair

 

i can recommend the one fuente osmena beside a hotel (forget the name) near a pizza hut

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good rates usually, @ fuente circle, under the public overpass, there is a very small money changer, i forgot the name

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I used the money changers on the lower ground floor at robinsons on fuente. I thought it was a good rate

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Jeepney

I used the money changers on the lower ground floor at robinsons on fuente. I thought it was a good rate

 

Yep, they are normally quite good!

Also the one in emall is ok...

Sometimes you have to ask tem to check the present rate!

 

Piet.

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udonthani

Consolacion Fooda had Euros for 56.5 yesterday and they were ready to take a single 5 I happened to have too. Outside Cebu city it seems you can exchange a far wider variety of currencies outside than inside. I got rid of 90 Malaysian ringgit for 13.5 when at departures at the airport, they were offering to buy them for only 11 (arrivals (11.5). You can also get rid of even Indonesian rupiah at Consolacion Fooda, they even had South African rand listed, I bet you'd struggle to do that at SM or indeed just about anywhere in Cebu city.

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Hi I am interested to buy some Euros at the moment, PM me if your interested.

 

i have some euro if your interested..................

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Fooda is Consolacion gives good rates for all currencies, not only USD. I have seen rates as low as 45 for the Euro in Manila which is a joke of course. Can somebody explain to me why the USD is always in favour? Is there a real demand?

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Money changer inside the Rustan's in ayala they have a higher rate compare to SM and othe money changer inside the ayala mall.

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Consolacion Fooda had Euros for 56.5 yesterday and they were ready to take a single 5 I happened to have too. Outside Cebu city it seems you can exchange a far wider variety of currencies outside than inside. I got rid of 90 Malaysian ringgit for 13.5 when at departures at the airport, they were offering to buy them for only 11 (arrivals (11.5). You can also get rid of even Indonesian rupiah at Consolacion Fooda, they even had South African rand listed, I bet you'd struggle to do that at SM or indeed just about anywhere in Cebu city.

I think it's called "supply and demand". How many people do you think are trying to change ringgit, rupiah or rand in Cebu on a regular basis? (Besides you, that is.) Money changing is a business that relies on turning over their "stock" like any other business. Those currencies are dead stock.

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udonthani
I think it's called "supply and demand". How many people do you think are trying to change ringgit, rupiah or rand in Cebu on a regular basis? (Besides you, that is.) Money changing is a business that relies on turning over their "stock" like any other business. Those currencies are dead stock.

 

if it really is 'supply and demand', then how come I can exchange baht and ringgit in Consolacion and at the Mandaue Metro but not at SM in Cebu city?

 

these two currencies are definitely not 'dead stock' but the negotiable currencies of two nation states that are both considerably wealthier than the Philippines.

 

the 10 south east Asian currencies fall into 3 categories :

 

1 - Fully Negotiatiable and you ought to be able to get it anywhere - Singapore dollar, Thai baht, Malay rinngit, and Brunei dollars

 

2 - you can get it, but you'll have to look - Philippine peso, Indo Rupiah

 

3 - nobody will touch it with a bargepole and toilet paper is worth more outside the home country - Burmese kiyat, Cambodian riel, Vietnamese dong, and Lao kip

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I think it's called "supply and demand". How many people do you think are trying to change ringgit, rupiah or rand in Cebu on a regular basis? (Besides you, that is.) Money changing is a business that relies on turning over their "stock" like any other business. Those currencies are dead stock.

 

if it really is 'supply and demand', then how come I can exchange baht and ringgit in Consolacion and at the Mandaue Metro but not at SM in Cebu city?

 

these two currencies are definitely not 'dead stock' but the negotiable currencies of two nation states that are both considerably wealthier than the Philippines.

 

the 10 south east Asian currencies fall into 3 categories :

 

1 - Fully Negotiatiable and you ought to be able to get it anywhere - Singapore dollar, Thai baht, Malay rinngit, and Brunei dollars

 

2 - you can get it, but you'll have to look - Philippine peso, Indo Rupiah

 

3 - nobody will touch it with a bargepole and toilet paper is worth more outside the home country - Burmese kiyat, Cambodian riel, Vietnamese dong, and Lao kip

How many Malaysians and Indonesians do you think are coming to CEBU needing to exchange their currencies? It really doesn't matter one bit how popular the currencies are OUTSIDE of Cebu. The reason you can't exchange them easily in Cebu is because there isn't any demand to do so. US Dollars, yes! British Pounds, yes! Japanese Yen, yes! Korean Won, yes! Maybe even Chinese Yuan, yes! My expectations would be different in Manila, but Cebu, you gotta be kidding.

 

Expecting Mom and Pop money changers to have just about any currency available is wishful thinking, no matter how popular they are outside of Cebu.

Edited by easy44
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udonthani

baht and ringgit are not just any currencies, but major ones that are the Philippines neighbors. You'd have thought it pretty damn silly if you couldn't get hold of Spanish pesetas in Munich when the European countries still had their own currencies. There's also close to half a million Filipinos living in Thailand and Malaysia at any one time, though admittedly few Thais and Malaysians are going to be ready to take their chances here. It's ridiculous so few outlets take these currencies.

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