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Swanny

Rosetta Stone

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rubio

This continues to fascinate me... so when they say different dialacts, they really mean different languages entirely. Damn I can't wait to get there and be even more confused. I was kinda looking forward to learning Cebuano prior to getting there.

 

Tagalog and Cebuano are different with some common words and same words with different meanings!

Cebuano or Visayan has various dialects. even in Cebu, the Cebu City dialect differs from the provinces. e.g. CC cebuano might pronounce an l as a w while provincial dialects may not.

It's much more a spoken language than a written one!

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CardiacKid

Where can I get Rosetta Stone here, preferably at less that retail cost.

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Sonny

Swanny;

 

Currently Rosetta Stone only supports Tagalog. Maybe in the future they will expand to Cebuano, but not now.

Rosetta Stone also has Visian (Cebuano) I would go with that.

 

They do? I haven't seen that yet.

 

 

Nope

 

post-29-038827300 1290135935_thumb.jpg

YOU ARE RIGHT....I CHECKED AND THEY ONLY OFFER 30 LANGUAGES NOW. IN THE PAST I REMEMBER THEM OFFERING MORE, INCLUDING VISIA.

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On-in-2

Swanny;

 

Currently Rosetta Stone only supports Tagalog. Maybe in the future they will expand to Cebuano, but not now.

Rosetta Stone also has Visian (Cebuano) I would go with that.

 

They do? I haven't seen that yet.

 

 

Nope

 

post-29-038827300 1290135935_thumb.jpg

YOU ARE RIGHT....I CHECKED AND THEY ONLY OFFER 30 LANGUAGES NOW. IN THE PAST I REMEMBER THEM OFFERING MORE, INCLUDING VISIA.

 

Watch out...the stupid moderator of this thread removed a post of mine where I told the guy to stop posting falsehoods.

 

Rosetta Stone DOES NOT have a Bisayan version.

 

Oh, and a message just to you, moderatorboy...you are insignificant, when not annoying and picayune.

 

Har de har har har

 

Pete of New Hampshire

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fredanna

My wife tells me that the older generation in CEBU will only know Bisayan. The last generation speaks bisayan as young kids and Tagalog is taught in the schools later, along with English.

Rosetta Stone is pretty good. Lottsa money but the GUMMINT in the USA uses Rosetta to send diplomats and special agents to other countries in a quick fashion.

Fred

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Headshot

This continues to fascinate me... so when they say different dialacts, they really mean different languages entirely. Damn I can't wait to get there and be even more confused. I was kinda looking forward to learning Cebuano prior to getting there.

There are over 70 distinct languages in the Philippines, and over 1000 different dialects of those languages. Like most languages in the world, there is a mishmash of "foreign" words thrown into every one of those languages and dialects. Any time they didn't have their own word for something, they just borrowed a word from another language to use (the caviat to this is that, because their pronunciation may be different than the source languages, it may sometimes be difficult to recognize the word when spoken. The way they spell these borrowed words is even more confusing. However, most of the time, you can figure them out. For instance, in the Cebuano dialect of Bisayan, you will hear Tagalog words, English words and Spanish words thrown into a conversation. So...not even understanding one word of Cebuano, you might still be able to reason out the jist of the conversation, if you understand some of the words from other languages that are thrown in.

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Turbota

I don't speak any form of Filipino, but if I was not so lazy, I would learn Tagalog (Filipino).

 

Why? Because you can use Tagalog in almost every part of the Philippines. Filipinos watch TV and all the TV shows are in Tagalog.

 

Cebuano is only good in the areas around Cebu just like Ilongo is only good in certain areas of Negros and Iloilo (they don't even speak Ilongo down in Duma)

 

 

If your going to spend time learning a language to use here in the PI ... at least learn a language you can pretty much use in the entire country.

 

At least that makes the most sense to me.

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Paul

I don't speak any form of Filipino, but if I was not so lazy, I would learn Tagalog (Filipino).

 

Why? Because you can use Tagalog in almost every part of the Philippines. Filipinos watch TV and all the TV shows are in Tagalog.

 

Cebuano is only good in the areas around Cebu just like Ilongo is only good in certain areas of Negros and Iloilo (they don't even speak Ilongo down in Duma)

 

 

If your going to spend time learning a language to use here in the PI ... at least learn a language you can pretty much use in the entire country.

 

At least that makes the most sense to me.

 

Actually, and although others will dispute this, Cebuano (Bisaya) is spoken by more people than Tagalog. Incidentally, there are some shows, although not many, in Cebuano.

 

It is also incorrect that Cebuano is only spoken in Cebu. It is commonly spoken throughout Cebu, Bohol, Much of Negros (including all of Negros Oriental) and some parts of Occidental, Most of Leyte, Biliran, and in most of Mindanao.

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Paul

This continues to fascinate me... so when they say different dialacts, they really mean different languages entirely. Damn I can't wait to get there and be even more confused. I was kinda looking forward to learning Cebuano prior to getting there.

There are over 70 distinct languages in the Philippines, and over 1000 different dialects of those languages. Like most languages in the world, there is a mishmash of "foreign" words thrown into every one of those languages and dialects. Any time they didn't have their own word for something, they just borrowed a word from another language to use (the caviat to this is that, because their pronunciation may be different than the source languages, it may sometimes be difficult to recognize the word when spoken. The way they spell these borrowed words is even more confusing. However, most of the time, you can figure them out. For instance, in the Cebuano dialect of Bisayan, you will hear Tagalog words, English words and Spanish words thrown into a conversation. So...not even understanding one word of Cebuano, you might still be able to reason out the jist of the conversation, if you understand some of the words from other languages that are thrown in.

 

There are actually eight (8) major languages in the Philippines, with 155 variations (dialects) of those languages:

 

Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilonggo, Naga, Ilocano, Pampanggo, Waray, and Pangalatok.

 

I am only familiar, or vaguely familiar with 5 of those listed.

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billten

IMO the Phil's should be like India, they have accepted that there are too many languages to bother trying for one unified one, so they carry on all business, politics and education in English. They seem to have done pretty well with it.

 

Also i agree with Paul, if you do the numbers, Bisaya is actually the widest spoken language in the Philippines. Trouble is that it lacks a power base unlike Tagalog and Manila.

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