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I was thinking about getting Rosetta Stone but it's strictly Tagalog from what I can tell. Probably not worth it for Cebuano? Are dialects really that much of a difference. That has always confused me. When I was in the navy i worked with several filipinos during my career and one in general tried explaining dialects to me. Never really understood how they could be so different.

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They can be very different. You could be saying something nice to someone in one dialect, and in the same dialect in a different part of the country could be something insulting or just plain different.

 

For example

 

cebuano: buto = vagina

 

tagalog: buto =bone

 

 

 

cebuano:langgam = bird

 

tagalog:langgam = ant

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Swanny;

 

Currently Rosetta Stone only supports Tagalog. Maybe in the future they will expand to Cebuano, but not now.

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Swanny;

 

Currently Rosetta Stone only supports Tagalog. Maybe in the future they will expand to Cebuano, but not now.

Rosetta Stone also has Visian (Cebuano) I would go with that.

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RetiredNavyGuy

Swanny;

 

Currently Rosetta Stone only supports Tagalog. Maybe in the future they will expand to Cebuano, but not now.

Rosetta Stone also has Visian (Cebuano) I would go with that.

 

They do? I haven't seen that yet.

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Swanny;

 

Currently Rosetta Stone only supports Tagalog. Maybe in the future they will expand to Cebuano, but not now.

Rosetta Stone also has Visian (Cebuano) I would go with that.

 

They do? I haven't seen that yet.

 

 

Nope

 

ScreenShot075.jpg

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SkyMan

There are many languages in the Philippines. Filipinos tend to use the word dialect and say that all the languages are dialects of Filipino as if Filipino was one language. That is not correct and I'm not sure if it was the Spanish or Americans that got them thinking that way. English has many dialects. American, Canadian eh?, British, Australian, Deep south, etc. But we can all pretty much talk to and understand each other for the most part. Many Cebuanos though, don't really know Tagolog and many Manilanos don't know any of the Visayan languages. I recently did some dealings with older Filipinos and one lady mentioned she taught Cebuano to her husband (Spanish speaking) but had spent half his life in Manila so knew Tagolog as well. Another had spent his whole life in Manila except for 2 years in Cebu but wouldn't speak here for fear of embarrassment.

 

When they say dialect here it is like a Frenchman saying he doesn't understand the Belgian dialect even though they do share many words in common.

 

I'd love it if Rosetta Stone would get off their arses and do a Cebuano version but I wonder if the Manila gov't is blocking that somehow.

Edited by SkyMan
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They can be very different. You could be saying something nice to someone in one dialect, and in the same dialect in a different part of the country could be something insulting or just plain different.

 

For example

 

cebuano: buto = vagina

 

tagalog: buto =bone

 

 

 

cebuano:langgam = bird

 

tagalog:langgam = ant

 

You forgot one other significant word:

 

Cebuano: libog = confused/confusing

Tagalog: libog = horny

 

Impromptu :thumbsup:

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This continues to fascinate me... so when they say different dialacts, they really mean different languages entirely. Damn I can't wait to get there and be even more confused. I was kinda looking forward to learning Cebuano prior to getting there.

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This continues to fascinate me... so when they say different dialacts, they really mean different languages entirely. Damn I can't wait to get there and be even more confused. I was kinda looking forward to learning Cebuano prior to getting there.

 

Cebuano/Visaya differs from Tagalog/Filipino as Dutch differs from German: it is very different, yet it is possible to get an idea of what they are talking about if you are fluent in either dialect. Let me tell you this: it is almost impossible to learn Cebuano prior to getting here. It is a very conversational language and thus can only be learned if you immerse yourself in a social environment where Cebuano is spoken. It doesn't have any clear rules, nor are the spellings consistent (e.g. u and o, i and e, ll and ly are used interchangeably as words are spelled phonetically). That is probably the reason why Rosetta didn't include Cebuano yet.

 

A personal advice: just learn a couple of expressions you might need when shopping, bargaining, asking for directions, agreeing and disagreeing, a few words to keep the drunk folks happy, and the usage of "kwan" (works wonders). Don't let your girlfriend/wife (?) convince you that you need it. I don't think it is a good thing to be able speak and understand the language fluently. You don't want to know what Filipinos talk about in a typical day-to-day conversation, believe me. It is very discouraging.

 

:paul:

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The Tagalog Rosetta Stone is excellent, if you want to learn Tagalog. I have Version 3 and have been very happy with it.

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Can you give a few examples of what they talk about that is very discouraging. Just curious.

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Can you give a few examples of what they talk about that is very discouraging. Just curious.

 

Shallow conversations can be done and heard everywhere, in every culture. So the depth (or the lack of it) of conversation is not really what discourages. What is much more disheartening is the deeper insight of the culture, as a result, spoiling the picture you tried very hard to maintain beautiful.

 

How would you feel if you overheard the following (random but actual) lines from conversations in a jeepney:

______________________________________________________________________________________

 

>>"Wow, I'm really craving for dried fish and some leftover crust of rice!"

 

>>A: "I have 50 pesos left but i need to buy a kilo of rice that costs 35 pesos. So that means I would only have....hmmm...how much is 50 minus 35?"

B: "Wait, let me use my cellphone to compute!"

 

>>"Let's take another jeepney! There is space beside the Amerikano but I'm shy!"

 

>>"Hahayyy...it is raining. It's so nice to go to sleep now!" (It is 10am)

 

>>A: "Your breath smells like fart!"

B: "No, it's your nose that smells like fart."

 

>>A: "Did you see koan at koan? He was koan yesterday!"

B: "Ahhh....he was koan? When?!"

A: "Yesterday!"

B: "Who?!

A: "It was koan!"

B: "Aaaahh...it was koan.."

 

>>"Wheeww! I'm so tired!" (After watching TV the whole day)

_______________________________________________________________

 

I don't think the language permits intellectual discourse, unless it is the kind that was spoken by old people (old-fashioned Cebuano). A shallow language can only permit shallow thinking if you allow it to be the language used in the head.

Edited by Impromptu
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tom_shor

Can you give a few examples of what they talk about that is very discouraging. Just curious.

 

Shallow conversations can be done and heard everywhere, in every culture. So the depth (or the lack of it) of conversation is not really what discourages. What is much more disheartening is the deeper insight of the culture, as a result, spoiling the picture you tried very hard to maintain beautiful.

 

How would you feel if you overheard the following (random but actual) lines from conversations in a jeepney:

______________________________________________________________________________________

 

>>"Wow, I'm really craving for dried fish and some leftover crust of rice!"

 

>>A: "I have 50 pesos left but i need to buy a kilo of rice that costs 35 pesos. So that means I would only have....hmmm...how much is 50 minus 35?"

B: "Wait, let me use my cellphone to compute!"

 

>>"Let's take another jeepney! There is space beside the Amerikano but I'm shy!"

 

>>"Hahayyy...it is raining. It's so nice to go to sleep now!" (It is 10am)

 

>>A: "Your breath smells like fart!"

B: "No, it's your nose that smells like fart."

 

>>A: "Did you see koan at koan? He was koan yesterday!"

B: "Ahhh....he was koan? When?!"

A: "Yesterday!"

B: "Who?!

A: "It was koan!"

B: "Aaaahh...it was koan.."

 

>>"Wheeww! I'm so tired!" (After watching TV the whole day)

_______________________________________________________________

 

I don't think the language permits intellectual discourse, unless it is the kind that was spoken by old people (old-fashioned Cebuano). A shallow language can only permit shallow thinking if you allow it to be the language used in the head.

 

 

Sounds just like plenty of chit chat conversations I've heard in English. Especially among the young.

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RetiredNavyGuy

Where can I get Rosetta Stone here, preferably at less that retail cost. I am looking for Spanish, actually. If Paul's ready to call it quits, it may be time to start preparing to move to Latin America.

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