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UZI

Using old HDD as 2nd drive.

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Mailman

Because I am locked out of all Windows directories & folders on that drive. I can see other folders.

 

When you say 'locked out', does that mean you can't see the directories at all? Or just can't access them? Does it give you an error message when you try?

 

I may know what is going on. Was the old drive formatted with NTFS or FAT32? If it was done up using NTFS, you may be having an issue with permissions. Now that you've booted up with another drive (and a new OS), the NTFS file system does not recognize the 'new user' as having the appropriate permissions.

 

You may try this:

 

First, turn off Simple File Sharing: Click Start, then My Computer. In the File Menu, click 'Tools' then 'Folder Options'. On the 'View' tab, go to Advanced Settings - search for 'Use simple file sharing' and clear the check from the box, and then click OK.

 

Then take ownership of the effected directories: Right-click the folder that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message, if one appears. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab. In the Name list, click your user name, Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group.

 

If you want to take ownership of the contents of that folder, click to select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box. Click OK.

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USMC-Retired

+when this happens he has zero options. He can do absolutely nothing.

 

Anytime you install new hardware it can happen. As the registry puts an address marker for each piece of hardware. So you either logon their site or call to get it unlocked.

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UZI

Because I am locked out of all Windows directories & folders on that drive. I can see other folders.

 

When you say 'locked out', does that mean you can't see the directories at all? Or just can't access them? Does it give you an error message when you try?

 

I may know what is going on. Was the old drive formatted with NTFS or FAT32? If it was done up using NTFS, you may be having an issue with permissions. Now that you've booted up with another drive (and a new OS), the NTFS file system does not recognize the 'new user' as having the appropriate permissions.

 

You may try this:

 

First, turn off Simple File Sharing: Click Start, then My Computer. In the File Menu, click 'Tools' then 'Folder Options'. On the 'View' tab, go to Advanced Settings - search for 'Use simple file sharing' and clear the check from the box, and then click OK.

 

Then take ownership of the effected directories: Right-click the folder that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message, if one appears. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab. In the Name list, click your user name, Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group.

 

If you want to take ownership of the contents of that folder, click to select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box. Click OK.

 

Norseman & Mailman,

 

Great stuff this.

 

Norseman - I have been thinking about checking Linux. I will look into Live CD

 

Mailman - I can't unlock files & folders I cannot see but appreciate the effort & replies.

 

I have one last trick to try myself. I had forgotten that my old pc had a fault with the network jack on it & I used a USB ethernet connector to connect my Globe cable. It isn't connected on the new pc but my old HDD my need it to identify the connection. Will try it tomorrow,

 

Cheers all

 

Uzi.

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UZI

Because I am locked out of all Windows directories & folders on that drive. I can see other folders.

 

When you say 'locked out', does that mean you can't see the directories at all? Or just can't access them? Does it give you an error message when you try?

 

I may know what is going on. Was the old drive formatted with NTFS or FAT32? If it was done up using NTFS, you may be having an issue with permissions. Now that you've booted up with another drive (and a new OS), the NTFS file system does not recognize the 'new user' as having the appropriate permissions.

 

You may try this:

 

First, turn off Simple File Sharing: Click Start, then My Computer. In the File Menu, click 'Tools' then 'Folder Options'. On the 'View' tab, go to Advanced Settings - search for 'Use simple file sharing' and clear the check from the box, and then click OK.

 

Then take ownership of the effected directories: Right-click the folder that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message, if one appears. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab. In the Name list, click your user name, Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group.

 

If you want to take ownership of the contents of that folder, click to select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box. Click OK.

 

Norseman & Mailman,

 

Great stuff this.

 

Norseman - I have been thinking about checking Linux. I will look into Live CD

 

Mailman - I can't unlock files & folders I cannot see but appreciate the effort & replies.

 

I have one last trick to try myself. I had forgotten that my old pc had a fault with the network jack on it & I used a USB ethernet connector to connect my Globe cable. It isn't connected on the new pc but my old HDD my need it to identify the connection. Will try it tomorrow,

 

Cheers all

 

Uzi.

 

Tim

 

Checked the link. Which do you recommend I download Puppy Linux or Very small Linux or....? :animal0019:

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David_LivinginTalisay

UZI,

 

I was going to suggest you try the Live CD of Puppy Linux

Puppy Linux enables you to save money while doing more work, even allowing you to do magic by recovering data from destroyed PCs or by removing malware from Windows. See this example about recovering files from Windows.

 

With Puppy Linux, you can carry your programs and data anywhere.

 

  • Easy - Just use a CD or USB flash to boot a PC. Puppy Linux is downloadable as ISO, an image that can be burned to CD or DVD.
  • Fast - Because Puppy is small, it can live in your PC's memory and be ready to quickly execute your commands, whereas in other systems, programs are first read from drive storage before being executed.
  • Save Money - Even if your PC has no hard disk (ex, broken hard disk), you can still boot Puppy via CD or USB and continue working. Old PCs that no longer work with new systems will still work good-as-new with Puppy.
  • Do More - Puppy boots in less than a minute, even in old PCs, and it does not require antivirus software. Administering Puppy is quick and minimal. With Puppy, you just have to take care of your data, which you can easily save to USB flash (Then forget about your operating system!). Your data can be read by other computers.
  • Do Magic -Help your friends suffering from computer malware by booting Puppy and removing malware from their PC (use antivirus that is built-in or can be installed in Puppy). Example - bad Autorun.inf is easily removed by Puppy (Just delete it as well as its companion exe program). If your friend thinks that she has lost data from her corrupted hard disk, boot Puppy and try saving her data!
  • Carry Anywhere (Portable) - Because Puppy is able to live in CD/DVD or USB flash, as well as save data to these same devices, you can carry your programs and data with you.

Are you now ready for Puppy? Keep these important reminders before using Puppy:

 

  • You don't have to install Puppy (to hard disk) to use it. Simply burn the ISO to CD/DVD and boot the PC or laptop with it. Once booted, you can then install it to USB flash (see the Setup menu), so you can use it for booting the PC when a CD is not available.
  • You don't have to save data to hard drive to work with Puppy. You can save data to USB flash or even to Internet storage (like www.drop.io ). When installed to USB flash, Puppy consumes only a little over 100 MB, or about 256 MB with OpenOffice. You can use the same USB flash (where Puppy is installed) for saving data.

The Puppy Linux files are primarily hosted by ibiblio.org and its mirror nluug.nl, with these links:http://ftp.nluug.nl/...str/puppylinux/

CURRENT RELEASE: Find LuPu 5.1.1 in the puppy-5.1.1 folder.

 

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay

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USMC-Retired

agree with Dave

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Cipro

I'm pretty sure suggesting Linux to a guy who's having trouble making XP run is not the best idea. I'm not a anti-Linux zealot, I'm posting this from Ubuntu using Google Chrome for Linux.

 

 

  • He needs to stop booting the old OS ASAP.
  • He should get the new Windows installation activated if it's not already.
  • He needs to chkdsk and properly mount the old drive.
  • Unhide all files, hidden and system.

 

 

I'm not much good at tech support though. I always end up just going and fixing it myself.

Edited by locktite

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USMC-Retired

just giving him the solutions he is looking for. I personally would have just slaved the old drive via USB.

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Cipro

just giving him the solutions he is looking for. I personally would have just slaved the old drive via USB.

 

Yeah you're clearly more experienced with IT type situations than I am, I generally try to only worry about my own machines.

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UZI

I'm pretty sure suggesting Linux to a guy who's having trouble making XP run is not the best idea. I'm not a anti-Linux zealot, I'm posting this from Ubuntu using Google Chrome for Linux.

 

 

  • He needs to stop booting the old OS ASAP.
  • He should get the new Windows installation activated if it's not already.
  • He needs to chkdsk and properly mount the old drive.
  • Unhide all files, hidden and system.

 

 

I'm not much good at tech support though. I always end up just going and fixing it myself.

Point 1 - As I have already said. I have stopped & it is now running as a slave with no problems

Point 2 - That is what I am asking for help with

Point 3 - As above, the old drive is working fine. It is mounted properly

Point 4 - All files are of course unhidden. I still dont have access to the Windows files until activated.

 

My PC is running fine with 240gb HDD (C & D) running as master with XP and my 80gb (E & F) as the slave but unable to get to some info on. If I cant get it then I will just reformat & use as a back up HDD.

 

David & Tim - Thanks, I will have a look at Puppy Linux. Software side of things usually my stong point, it's hardware that I don't get at times. I didn't slave via USB as I already have a portable USB drive that only boots when it feels like it on my laptop & just sits and flashes its light when I connect to my pc. Not trusting that method again.

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Cipro
Point 4 - All files are of course unhidden. I still dont have access to the Windows files until activated.

 

OK, I don't use un-activated Windows Xp so I'm not sure, but I don't understand this. You really should be able, as Admin, to take ownership of everything on the drive(s) and do as you wish, with a few odd exceptions like the restore areas.

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David_LivinginTalisay

 

My PC is running fine with 240gb HDD (C & D) running as master with XP and my 80gb (E & F) as the slave but unable to get to some info on. If I cant get it then I will just reformat & use as a back up HDD.

 

David & Tim - Thanks, I will have a look at Puppy Linux.

 

UZI,

 

I was very impressed how easy using Puppy Linux was.

 

Download the .iso image and burn to a CDROM,

 

Boot from Live Puppy Linux CDROM that you created.

 

Answer a few Questions like type of Keyboard, what Language, what Timezone, Screen Resolution and you are pretty much done.

 

Did not have to load any Drivers and it sorted everything out and was able to connect to the Internet and view all the HDD and Folders etc.

I am fairly confident that you would then be able to see and access all the Folders and Files of you 80GB HDD (but they wont be 'E' and 'F' under Linux

 

The instructions given here, pretty much walk anyone through the entire process.

 

http://help.artaro.e...disk-vista.html

 

 

Here is a section of that excellent Tutorial

Recover files from Windows Vista hard disk using Puppy Linux

 

Mounting drives and partitions in Puppy Linux

Puppy Linux does not look really good, so do not use this for comparing Windows and Linux versions (if you want to see a really beautiful Linux Desktop, try Linux Mint (Ubuntu Linux derivative) instead). smiley-laughing.gif This is because Puppy Linux is optimized for reasonable performance on older machines.

 

By now you should have noticed icons appearing on the bottom left of Desktop. These are your floppy (FDD) drives, partitions on local hard disks and CD/DVD device(s). Floppy discs start with "fd", partitions on local hard disks start with "sd" and CD/DVD devices start with "sr". Each one has a partition number. This is the way Linux distinguishes between different devices - so if you have one hard disk with two partitions, they would be named "sda1" and "sda2" - "a" for the first physical hard disk and "1" and "2" for the partitions on it. If you have two hard disks, both containing one partition, they would be called "sda1" and "sdb1". If you have just one hard disk with one partition, there will be only one icon - "sda1".

w7puppy18.jpg

 

In Puppy Linux you have to mount a disk first to start using it. To do that, click on some icon starting with "sd" - "sda1", for example. After a few seconds, contents of the disk will open in new window.bottom:

w7puppy19.jpg

 

As Linux does not use different drive letters, such as "C:" or "D:" to distinguish between disks, all mounted disks will be put in a special folder named "mnt", short for "mount". You can see that from the picture above - the sda1 partition mounted appears as/mnt/sda1 in Puppy Linux.

 

On Desktop you will see a green ring on a mounted partition icon. I have also connected my USB flash drive and this has been named "sdd1".

xppuppy26.jpg

 

Connect your USB flash drive or external hard disk and wait for the icon to appear on Desktop. Then click its icon to mount it. Please note the name of the mounted drive, such as "sdd1" or "sdb1", you will need it soon.

Do not close the mounted drive windows yet. If you have, just click the mounted drive icon on Desktop again and the contents will open again.

 

 

Copying your files to external hard disk or USB flash drive

Return to mounted partition contents window and click on Users folder. Please note that you need to click only once to open a folder. If you need to go back in folder contents, click the green up arrow on toolbar.

 

Here are contents of a typical Users folder. You can always ignore folders named "administrator", "Default User", "Default" and "All Users". Here are two users - Mirjam and Margus.

If you use Public Documents (the files shared between different users on one computer), then you can find them under Publicfolder.

w7puppy20.jpg

 

Click on a user's folder to see its contents. If the contents are organized strangely, click the magnifying glass icon (not the one with plus sign!) on Toolbar to size icons automatically.

Here are the most important folders you need to copy to your USB drive.

 

  • Desktop - all items on your Windows Vista Desktop (icons, files, folders, etc)
  • Downloads - files downloaded from the Internet
  • Music - your music files (mp3-s, wma-s, etc)
  • Saved Games
  • Templates - only necessary if you use Microsoft Office and you have created special templates for documents
  • Documents - contents of your My Documents folder (note that in Windows Vista this does not include My Pictures, My Music and My Videos folders!)
  • Favorites - your Internet Explorer favorites
  • Pictures - your photos and pictures
  • Searches - only necessary if you have saved some search criteria
  • Videos - your video files

Please note that "Links" and "My Documents" here are just links to folders named Favorites and Documents - you do not need to copy them in Windows Vista!

<w7puppy21.jpg

 

To determine disk space needed for copying a folder, right-click on the folder, select Dir '<folder name>' and click Properties.

w7puppy22.jpg

 

Wait until folder size is calculated in Size: field. To close folder properties, click the black X in the right side of Title Bar or clickClose button. Again, "M" means megabytes, "G" means gigabytes.

w7puppy23.jpg

 

To see disk space available on your flash drive or external hard disk, click house-shaped icon named file on Desktop.

xppuppy28d1.jpg

 

This opens a folder named "home". Click the green up arrow on Toolbar to see list of all available folders.

xppuppy28d2.jpg

 

Now locate and click on folder named "mnt".

xppuppy28d3.jpg

 

Locate the mounted flash drive or external hard disk, for example "sdb1" or "sdd1". Right-click on it, select Mount point '<mounted drive name>' and click Properties.

xppuppy28e.jpg

 

The Size: field displays total size, used space and free space of the selected drive. Make sure there is enough free space on the drive for the folders you want to copy.

Click Close button to close drive properties. Also close the window displaying mounted drives by clicking the black X button on the right of Title bar.

xppuppy28f.jpg

 

The strange limitation of Puppy Linux is that you cannot copy more than one folder at a time. Well, it's better than losing all your data, right? smiley-wink.gif

 

To copy a folder to your flash drive or external hard disk, right-click on the folder, select Dir '<folder name>' and then clickCopy...

To select and copy multiple folders at once, hold down CTRL key on your keyboard and click each folder you want to copy. Release the key after selection is complete and use keyboard shortcut CTRL+C to copy folders. (Thank you Raffy Mananghaya for pointing this out, I forgot to include the tip in the article)

w7puppy26.jpg

 

Type the path to your USB flash drive or external hard disk (see the icons on Desktop), for example "/mnt/sdd1/" or "/mnt/sdb1/" and click Copy. Make sure there is a "/" in the end!

Please remember that in Linux everything is case-sensitive, so "sdd1" does not equal "Sdd1" or "SDD1" or "sDd1". Use only lowercase letters here!

xppuppy29.jpg

 

The copy dialog will open and it will list all files copied. Wait until the copy process is complete.

w7puppy27.jpg

 

Please remember to copy folders named Desktop, Documents, Downloads, Favorites, Music, Pictures, Saved Games, Searches, Templates and Videos, not just one of them!

 

So UZI read and follow http://help.artaro.eu/index.php/windows-vista/troubleshooting-windows-vista/recover-files-from-hard-disk-vista.html and it should help get access to all those Files.

You can then look at Boot.ini and rename to Boot.tmp so it will be ignored. My PC still managed to Boot, without finding Boot.ini after that

I needed to do this when a Windows XP 'Repair' got screwed up, and it tried to reinstall Windows XP. I did not want to do a reinstall, but it kept asking me to put the original Windows XP Disk in, and would not let me do anything else!

I can't remember exactly what I did now, but can say that by running the Puppy Linux Live CD, gave me access to all the Folders and Files, and helped me stop that re-install process, by deleting certain files.

At the very least you should be able to copy important Files/Folders over to your new HDD before you consider reformatting your old Drive!

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay

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UZI

 

My PC is running fine with 240gb HDD (C & D) running as master with XP and my 80gb (E & F) as the slave but unable to get to some info on. If I cant get it then I will just reformat & use as a back up HDD.

 

David & Tim - Thanks, I will have a look at Puppy Linux.

 

UZI,

 

I was very impressed how easy using Puppy Linux was.

 

Download the .iso image and burn to a CDROM,

 

Boot from Live Puppy Linux CDROM that you created.

 

Answer a few Questions like type of Keyboard, what Language, what Timezone, Screen Resolution and you are pretty much done.

 

Did not have to load any Drivers and it sorted everything out and was able to connect to the Internet and view all the HDD and Folders etc.

I am fairly confident that you would then be able to see and access all the Folders and Files of you 80GB HDD (but they wont be 'E' and 'F' under Linux

 

The instructions given here, pretty much walk anyone through the entire process.

 

http://help.artaro.e...disk-vista.html

 

 

Here is a section of that excellent Tutorial

Recover files from Windows Vista hard disk using Puppy Linux

 

Mounting drives and partitions in Puppy Linux

Puppy Linux does not look really good, so do not use this for comparing Windows and Linux versions (if you want to see a really beautiful Linux Desktop, try Linux Mint (Ubuntu Linux derivative) instead). smiley-laughing.gif This is because Puppy Linux is optimized for reasonable performance on older machines.

 

By now you should have noticed icons appearing on the bottom left of Desktop. These are your floppy (FDD) drives, partitions on local hard disks and CD/DVD device(s). Floppy discs start with "fd", partitions on local hard disks start with "sd" and CD/DVD devices start with "sr". Each one has a partition number. This is the way Linux distinguishes between different devices - so if you have one hard disk with two partitions, they would be named "sda1" and "sda2" - "a" for the first physical hard disk and "1" and "2" for the partitions on it. If you have two hard disks, both containing one partition, they would be called "sda1" and "sdb1". If you have just one hard disk with one partition, there will be only one icon - "sda1".

w7puppy18.jpg

 

In Puppy Linux you have to mount a disk first to start using it. To do that, click on some icon starting with "sd" - "sda1", for example. After a few seconds, contents of the disk will open in new window.bottom:

w7puppy19.jpg

 

As Linux does not use different drive letters, such as "C:" or "D:" to distinguish between disks, all mounted disks will be put in a special folder named "mnt", short for "mount". You can see that from the picture above - the sda1 partition mounted appears as/mnt/sda1 in Puppy Linux.

 

On Desktop you will see a green ring on a mounted partition icon. I have also connected my USB flash drive and this has been named "sdd1".

xppuppy26.jpg

 

Connect your USB flash drive or external hard disk and wait for the icon to appear on Desktop. Then click its icon to mount it. Please note the name of the mounted drive, such as "sdd1" or "sdb1", you will need it soon.

Do not close the mounted drive windows yet. If you have, just click the mounted drive icon on Desktop again and the contents will open again.

 

 

Copying your files to external hard disk or USB flash drive

Return to mounted partition contents window and click on Users folder. Please note that you need to click only once to open a folder. If you need to go back in folder contents, click the green up arrow on toolbar.

 

Here are contents of a typical Users folder. You can always ignore folders named "administrator", "Default User", "Default" and "All Users". Here are two users - Mirjam and Margus.

If you use Public Documents (the files shared between different users on one computer), then you can find them under Publicfolder.

w7puppy20.jpg

 

Click on a user's folder to see its contents. If the contents are organized strangely, click the magnifying glass icon (not the one with plus sign!) on Toolbar to size icons automatically.

Here are the most important folders you need to copy to your USB drive.

 

  • Desktop - all items on your Windows Vista Desktop (icons, files, folders, etc)
  • Downloads - files downloaded from the Internet
  • Music - your music files (mp3-s, wma-s, etc)
  • Saved Games
  • Templates - only necessary if you use Microsoft Office and you have created special templates for documents
  • Documents - contents of your My Documents folder (note that in Windows Vista this does not include My Pictures, My Music and My Videos folders!)
  • Favorites - your Internet Explorer favorites
  • Pictures - your photos and pictures
  • Searches - only necessary if you have saved some search criteria
  • Videos - your video files

Please note that "Links" and "My Documents" here are just links to folders named Favorites and Documents - you do not need to copy them in Windows Vista!

<w7puppy21.jpg

 

To determine disk space needed for copying a folder, right-click on the folder, select Dir '<folder name>' and click Properties.

w7puppy22.jpg

 

Wait until folder size is calculated in Size: field. To close folder properties, click the black X in the right side of Title Bar or clickClose button. Again, "M" means megabytes, "G" means gigabytes.

w7puppy23.jpg

 

To see disk space available on your flash drive or external hard disk, click house-shaped icon named file on Desktop.

xppuppy28d1.jpg

 

This opens a folder named "home". Click the green up arrow on Toolbar to see list of all available folders.

xppuppy28d2.jpg

 

Now locate and click on folder named "mnt".

xppuppy28d3.jpg

 

Locate the mounted flash drive or external hard disk, for example "sdb1" or "sdd1". Right-click on it, select Mount point '<mounted drive name>' and click Properties.

xppuppy28e.jpg

 

The Size: field displays total size, used space and free space of the selected drive. Make sure there is enough free space on the drive for the folders you want to copy.

Click Close button to close drive properties. Also close the window displaying mounted drives by clicking the black X button on the right of Title bar.

xppuppy28f.jpg

 

The strange limitation of Puppy Linux is that you cannot copy more than one folder at a time. Well, it's better than losing all your data, right? smiley-wink.gif

 

To copy a folder to your flash drive or external hard disk, right-click on the folder, select Dir '<folder name>' and then clickCopy...

To select and copy multiple folders at once, hold down CTRL key on your keyboard and click each folder you want to copy. Release the key after selection is complete and use keyboard shortcut CTRL+C to copy folders. (Thank you Raffy Mananghaya for pointing this out, I forgot to include the tip in the article)

w7puppy26.jpg

 

Type the path to your USB flash drive or external hard disk (see the icons on Desktop), for example "/mnt/sdd1/" or "/mnt/sdb1/" and click Copy. Make sure there is a "/" in the end!

Please remember that in Linux everything is case-sensitive, so "sdd1" does not equal "Sdd1" or "SDD1" or "sDd1". Use only lowercase letters here!

xppuppy29.jpg

 

The copy dialog will open and it will list all files copied. Wait until the copy process is complete.

w7puppy27.jpg

 

Please remember to copy folders named Desktop, Documents, Downloads, Favorites, Music, Pictures, Saved Games, Searches, Templates and Videos, not just one of them!

 

So UZI read and follow http://help.artaro.e...disk-vista.html and it should help get access to all those Files.

 

You can then look at Boot.ini and rename to Boot.tmp so it will be ignored. My PC still managed to Boot, without finding Boot.ini after that

I needed to do this when a Windows XP 'Repair' got screwed up, and it tried to reinstall Windows XP. I did not want to do a reinstall, but it kept asking me to put the original Windows XP Disk in, and would not let me do anything else!

I can't remember exactly what I did now, but can say that by running the Puppy Linux Live CD, gave me access to all the Folders and Files, and helped me stop that re-install process, by deleting certain files.

At the very least you should be able to copy important Files/Folders over to your new HDD before you consider reformatting your old Drive!

 

David,

 

Thanks for the detailed info (no really, this is the time to do details) except I will use the instructions for XP not Vista as your link supplied although similar. I tried one last time using my original (old pc) USB to broadband connector which worked fine on the new drive before changing the boot order to the old drive. Still Microsoft couldn't find my connection so................:P bye bye Windows (on the old HDD).

 

Sometimes you put off something just because it will take a little effort & the motivation isn't there at the time. For years I have been promising myself to look into Linux.........NOW I am motivated.

 

Best case this sorts getting my files access on the old HDD & I reformat afterwards using Puppy instead. Worst case I just reformat, kiss goodbye to my old files (I can live without them if needed) & use the drive purely as a 2nd drive for storage. I will learn more about Linux through this though, so not a waste of time either way.

 

I will let you know how it goes.

 

Thanks all

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USMC-Retired

glad it worked out. So the forum to diagnosis problems does work.. LOL.

 

It took a little to get around what you were saying but a couple good ideas later from several people does work.

 

I would not recommend Puppy though as your primary (maybe a dual boot as Dave suggested in his first post). Different topic Different subject. If you want to know why Post it. Sure you will get mixed response. But if you are happy it matters zero what others think.

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UZI

glad it worked out. So the forum to diagnosis problems does work.. LOL.

 

It took a little to get around what you were saying but a couple good ideas later from several people does work.

 

I would not recommend Puppy though as your primary (maybe a dual boot as Dave suggested in his first post). Different topic Different subject. If you want to know why Post it. Sure you will get mixed response. But if you are happy it matters zero what others think.

Hahaha....ok ya got me. Oh he of little faith:thumbs_up:

 

Well just to give you helpful guys some quick feedback - I am here typing this after a few minutes of BOOTING WITH PUPPY. I am connected using Firefox & everything is working so far. Now need to see how the rest of this works & whether I can find the files I need.

 

Its like switching on a pc for the 1st time.....whats this, how does that work, oh look I did that. Like a kid in a candy factory :)

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