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UZI

Using old HDD as 2nd drive.

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UZI

Let me see if I can explain this from an dummies point of view so it can be understood by those who may know the solution.

 

I have a new PC that has a HDD which is IDE. I have the HDD from my old PC which is on SATA (ATA?). When I connect my old HDD it boots up 1st, as drive C/D with the IDE drive as E/F. I have the jumpers in my SATA HDD set to slave.

 

Now that would be perfect as my Windows XP on the old drive is original (disc) and I have all my emails saved to Outlook Express on it. The problem is that I cant use the drive as XP asks to reverify but I haven't got my internet connection set up on that drive so it goes to dial up & I can't find how to access my Globe which of course is now on E drive. Hope this is making sense. :bashtroll:

 

As it stands, the old drive is unplugged & I am back with my IDE drive as C/D

 

Anyone (Tim?) able to talk me through this

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David_LivinginTalisay

UZI,

 

Obviously you need an OS to boot up from, and this needs to be on a Hard Disk (or possibly a Flash Drive or a CD or DVD). Not all BIOS can be set to boot off Flash Drives, and CD/DVD drives).

 

Have you tried looking at your BIOS Boot Settings, so whatever Hard Disk you want, is the first 'normal' HDD to Boot from (as usually one has CD/DVD and or Floppy or Flash as 1st choice, so one can 'rescue' a crashed system)?

 

I have a similar situation, but my new PC has SATA as well as IDE and I loaded an OS onto the SATA drive (as bigger capacity than my old IDE drives).

 

I now have a choice of Windows XP, Windows 7, and Puppy Linux (as well as Tiny XP ver 10, which is a 'compact' version of Windows XP with lot of 'MS' stuff removed)

 

I use Acronis OS Selector to enable Multiple Boot.

Acronis OS Selector is good, as it knows what drive has what OS, even if the Drive letters change due to altering the Boot order,

(or if you remove a HDD, and substitiute another, like I did with a removable drive, but the boot time is considerably extended, so best avoid this if at all possible, or reinstall Acronis OS Selector and start over).

Hope this might help?

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USMC-Retired

Dave makes perfect sense in what he says.

 

If the IDE hard drive has no operating system the SATA will be next in the selector via the BIOS to boot. No matter what you do as the BIOS will search for an operating system.

 

If the IDE HD has a operating system and it still goes to that drive ensure you have the BIOS priority set. F2 or ctrl alt escp, normally as you start will take you to the BIOS when you start and change the boot priority. As SATA is always first over IDE.

 

I did not hear where you changed the BIOS settings. Start there. Lets get you running then Dave's excellent idea of dual boot is great.

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UZI

Dave makes perfect sense in what he says.

 

If the IDE hard drive has no operating system the SATA will be next in the selector via the BIOS to boot. No matter what you do as the BIOS will search for an operating system.

 

If the IDE HD has a operating system and it still goes to that drive ensure you have the BIOS priority set. F2 or ctrl alt escp, normally as you start will take you to the BIOS when you start and change the boot priority. As SATA is always first over IDE.

 

I did not hear where you changed the BIOS settings. Start there. Lets get you running then Dave's excellent idea of dual boot is great.

 

Ok 1st of all thanks for the replies guys.

 

Now then, I think you both missed the point of my OP:

 

1. I did say

 

"As it stands, the old drive is unplugged & I am back with my IDE drive as C/D"

 

so I do have an O/S on it. It is XP & my system is fully up & running.

 

2. My old HDD also has XP but I cant get into the drive without reverifying it.

 

3. I dont want to change the boot order. I want it to boot my SATA then the IDE.

 

My problem remains, at this point, as stated in para 3 in my OP. Hope that made things a bit clearer.

 

NOTE - EDIT: Got the drive descriptions the wrong way round (old age :biggrin_01: ) my old drive is IDE but boots 1st not the new & already installed & running SATA.

Edited by UZI

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The Mason

I'm assuming that by 'verify XP' you mean activate XP. If so, this KB from the MS site describes how to do it when you don't have an Internet connection.

 

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307890

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USMC-Retired

when you connect it to the system it should verify it as a drive.... Hence it makes it C.

 

 

If you want to plug it in you must go to the bios and then change the boot order. Otherwise it will try to boot from the old drive. Since it is Sata. Sata is first in boot priority. No matter what the jumpers say. You are not slaving a IDE to IDE. You are trying to slave a Sata to IDE that will not work. They operate seperatly. Thus your only option is change boot priority in the BIOS. Then it will change the order. IDE First and Sata second. Thus IDE will be C: and Sata D:. With IDE running the operating system.

 

From what I read the Sata is always trying to boot first and you want the IDE to boot. Since the Sata you can not verify windows on. If that is true then what I said must happen.

Edited by Norseman

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UZI

I'm assuming that by 'verify XP' you mean activate XP. If so, this KB from the MS site describes how to do it when you don't have an Internet connection.

 

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307890

 

Nope. Dont need to activate it. Been using it for 4 years. The fact that it is in a new pc it has detected things have changed & on boot up it stops at the windows log in screen & asks me to re VERIFY but I cant get to my desktop and it doesn't let me use my Globe broadband as that is on the other HDD desktop.

 

Ow my head hurts

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David_LivinginTalisay

Dave makes perfect sense in what he says.

 

If the IDE hard drive has no operating system the SATA will be next in the selector via the BIOS to boot. No matter what you do as the BIOS will search for an operating system.

 

If the IDE HD has a operating system and it still goes to that drive ensure you have the BIOS priority set. F2 or ctrl alt escp, normally as you start will take you to the BIOS when you start and change the boot priority. As SATA is always first over IDE.

 

I did not hear where you changed the BIOS settings. Start there. Lets get you running then Dave's excellent idea of dual boot is great.

 

Ok 1st of all thanks for the replies guys.

 

Now then, I think you both missed the point of my OP:

 

1. I did say

 

"As it stands, the old drive is unplugged & I am back with my IDE drive as C/D"

 

so I do have an O/S on it. It is XP & my system is fully up & running.

 

2. My old HDD also has XP but I cant get into the drive without reverifying it.

 

3. I dont want to change the boot order. I want it to boot my SATA then the IDE.

 

My problem remains, at this point, as stated in para 3 in my OP. Hope that made things a bit clearer.

 

NOTE - EDIT: Got the drive descriptions the wrong way round (old age :biggrin_01: ) my old drive is IDE but boots 1st not the new & already installed & running SATA.

 

OK that now makes more sense, that your old HDD is IDE and your New PC has SATA (same as mine).

 

Best to not have old Disk Drives connected when installing new Windows OS as it does indeed detect the other Windows OS and 'interferes with the Boot.ini Files.

 

So if I have now understood this correctly, it is the Windows XP on your old IDE HDD that is now not booting, is that so you are running off the new SATA drive that also has Windows XP on it, is that correct?

 

Rename such Boot .ini to Boot.temp or something on the HDD that is not booting up, and try again (you can then change it back if required)?

 

This is what I did, when I forgot to unplug my old IDE HDD, and getting rid of Boot.ini stopped the Multiple Boot that Windows tried setting up.

 

Since you are posting to this Forum, you presumably are able to access the Internet and could try downloading a trial copy of Acronis OS Selector

Comes as part of Acronis® Disk Director® 11 Home

Download Free Demo

This replaces the Boot.ini with a GUI interface that has detected and listed all the OS found on all your Disk Drives.

You can manually 'rename' the OS and change the 'Icon'/colour for each OS.

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay

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UZI

when you connect it to the system it should verify it as a drive.... Hence it makes it C.

 

 

If you want to plug it in you must go to the bios and then change the boot order. Otherwise it will try to boot from the old drive. Since it is Sata. Sata is first in boot priority. No matter what the jumpers say. You are not slaving a IDE to IDE. You are trying to slave a Sata to IDE that will not work. They operate seperatly. Thus your only option is change boot priority in the BIOS. Then it will change the order. IDE First and Sata second. Thus IDE will be C: and Sata D:. With IDE running the operating system.

 

From what I read the Sata is always trying to boot first and you want the IDE to boot. Since the Sata you can not verify windows on. If that is true then what I said must happen.

 

Tim,

 

Hmm...I had my doubts as to whether communications between someone with basic hardware knowledge & those who understand it could work on a forum like this. It seems that what I am saying is not being followed or I am not getting the answers & you didn't appear to read my EDIT NOTE correcting the drive descriptions. :)

 

First of all, while waiting for this reply, I opened up the case & reconnected my IDE HDD. Then restarted my pc. It immediately started booting as my old system start screen. I went into the BIOS & it showed this:

 

Primary IDE master - not detected

Primary IDE slave - ST3802******

SATA1 - ST3259*****

 

I went to 'Boot' which had 1st drive as IDE & SATA as Drive 2, so what you said "Sata is first in boot priority. No matter what the jumpers say." didn't hold true for some reason. & changed Drive 1 to Drive 2, saved & Exited. The system booted up correctly now with the SATA 1st as Drive C & D with my old Drive as E & F.

 

So everything is there & I can see all drives. Problem is still with the IDE drive having my old XP on it but I cannot access the info, such as my address book on Outlook Express & all my emails, which is the main thing I want. If I boot up the IDE drive I get the Welcome screen & a pop up saying something like 'Windows has detected a significant change & needs to verify your license - or along those lines. The problem is I dont know how to use my Globe which is on the SATA to reactivate the XP on the IDE. Dont need dual boot (think I would have the same issue anyway) & dont really want to phone them unless I have no choice.

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Mailman

So everything is there & I can see all drives. Problem is still with the IDE drive having my old XP on it but I cannot access the info, such as my address book on Outlook Express & all my emails, which is the main thing I want.

 

You should be able to go into Outlook (installed on the new drive) and import your old data from the directory on the old drive.

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UZI

So everything is there & I can see all drives. Problem is still with the IDE drive having my old XP on it but I cannot access the info, such as my address book on Outlook Express & all my emails, which is the main thing I want.

 

You should be able to go into Outlook (installed on the new drive) and import your old data from the directory on the old drive.

 

Ah if only it was so simple. I cannot 'see' any of my Windows files on drive E (my IDE) so I cannot import my address book or my inbox etc as I cannot 'see' them just as I can't do as David suggests as I cant 'see' any boot.ini on drive E

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USMC-Retired

There is no way that you can stop that activation. The address for the windows is diffrent.

 

However try and boot in safe mode. F8 key will take you to safe without networking. This will allow you into the computer or it should. If not boot F8 to command prompt and you can then go through DOS mode to get the information.

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Mailman

Ah if only it was so simple. I cannot 'see' any of my Windows files on drive E (my IDE) so I cannot import my address book or my inbox etc as I cannot 'see' them just as I can't do as David suggests as I cant 'see' any boot.ini on drive E

 

I'm not sure I understand. You can see all the drives but you can't see any of the directories on them?

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UZI

Ah if only it was so simple. I cannot 'see' any of my Windows files on drive E (my IDE) so I cannot import my address book or my inbox etc as I cannot 'see' them just as I can't do as David suggests as I cant 'see' any boot.ini on drive E

 

I'm not sure I understand. You can see all the drives but you can't see any of the directories on them?

Because I am locked out of all Windows directories & folders on that drive. I can see other folders.

 

Norseman - I will try what you suggest tomorrow & let you know if I have any luck.

 

Thanks to all who replied. :)

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USMC-Retired

The last thing I recommend is a LiveCD boot. http://www.livecdlist.com/

 

What that will do is run Linux from a CD. Thus allowing you to get what you need.

 

On that site gives you links to download and then burn to CD and then change boot order to boot CD first. Just a thought.

 

I have a bootable USB I keep just incase. I get the dreaded BSOD. (Blue Screen of Death)

Edited by Norseman

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Mailman

Because I am locked out of all Windows directories & folders on that drive. I can see other folders.

 

When you say 'locked out', does that mean you can't see the directories at all? Or just can't access them? Does it give you an error message when you try?

 

I may know what is going on. Was the old drive formatted with NTFS or FAT32? If it was done up using NTFS, you may be having an issue with permissions. Now that you've booted up with another drive (and a new OS), the NTFS file system does not recognize the 'new user' as having the appropriate permissions.

 

You may try this:

 

First, turn off Simple File Sharing: Click Start, then My Computer. In the File Menu, click 'Tools' then 'Folder Options'. On the 'View' tab, go to Advanced Settings - search for 'Use simple file sharing' and clear the check from the box, and then click OK.

 

Then take ownership of the effected directories: Right-click the folder that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message, if one appears. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab. In the Name list, click your user name, Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group.

 

If you want to take ownership of the contents of that folder, click to select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box. Click OK.

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USMC-Retired

+when this happens he has zero options. He can do absolutely nothing.

 

Anytime you install new hardware it can happen. As the registry puts an address marker for each piece of hardware. So you either logon their site or call to get it unlocked.

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UZI

Because I am locked out of all Windows directories & folders on that drive. I can see other folders.

 

When you say 'locked out', does that mean you can't see the directories at all? Or just can't access them? Does it give you an error message when you try?

 

I may know what is going on. Was the old drive formatted with NTFS or FAT32? If it was done up using NTFS, you may be having an issue with permissions. Now that you've booted up with another drive (and a new OS), the NTFS file system does not recognize the 'new user' as having the appropriate permissions.

 

You may try this:

 

First, turn off Simple File Sharing: Click Start, then My Computer. In the File Menu, click 'Tools' then 'Folder Options'. On the 'View' tab, go to Advanced Settings - search for 'Use simple file sharing' and clear the check from the box, and then click OK.

 

Then take ownership of the effected directories: Right-click the folder that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message, if one appears. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab. In the Name list, click your user name, Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group.

 

If you want to take ownership of the contents of that folder, click to select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box. Click OK.

 

Norseman & Mailman,

 

Great stuff this.

 

Norseman - I have been thinking about checking Linux. I will look into Live CD

 

Mailman - I can't unlock files & folders I cannot see but appreciate the effort & replies.

 

I have one last trick to try myself. I had forgotten that my old pc had a fault with the network jack on it & I used a USB ethernet connector to connect my Globe cable. It isn't connected on the new pc but my old HDD my need it to identify the connection. Will try it tomorrow,

 

Cheers all

 

Uzi.

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UZI

Because I am locked out of all Windows directories & folders on that drive. I can see other folders.

 

When you say 'locked out', does that mean you can't see the directories at all? Or just can't access them? Does it give you an error message when you try?

 

I may know what is going on. Was the old drive formatted with NTFS or FAT32? If it was done up using NTFS, you may be having an issue with permissions. Now that you've booted up with another drive (and a new OS), the NTFS file system does not recognize the 'new user' as having the appropriate permissions.

 

You may try this:

 

First, turn off Simple File Sharing: Click Start, then My Computer. In the File Menu, click 'Tools' then 'Folder Options'. On the 'View' tab, go to Advanced Settings - search for 'Use simple file sharing' and clear the check from the box, and then click OK.

 

Then take ownership of the effected directories: Right-click the folder that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message, if one appears. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab. In the Name list, click your user name, Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group.

 

If you want to take ownership of the contents of that folder, click to select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box. Click OK.

 

Norseman & Mailman,

 

Great stuff this.

 

Norseman - I have been thinking about checking Linux. I will look into Live CD

 

Mailman - I can't unlock files & folders I cannot see but appreciate the effort & replies.

 

I have one last trick to try myself. I had forgotten that my old pc had a fault with the network jack on it & I used a USB ethernet connector to connect my Globe cable. It isn't connected on the new pc but my old HDD my need it to identify the connection. Will try it tomorrow,

 

Cheers all

 

Uzi.

 

Tim

 

Checked the link. Which do you recommend I download Puppy Linux or Very small Linux or....? :animal0019:

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David_LivinginTalisay

UZI,

 

I was going to suggest you try the Live CD of Puppy Linux

Puppy Linux enables you to save money while doing more work, even allowing you to do magic by recovering data from destroyed PCs or by removing malware from Windows. See this example about recovering files from Windows.

 

With Puppy Linux, you can carry your programs and data anywhere.

 

  • Easy - Just use a CD or USB flash to boot a PC. Puppy Linux is downloadable as ISO, an image that can be burned to CD or DVD.
  • Fast - Because Puppy is small, it can live in your PC's memory and be ready to quickly execute your commands, whereas in other systems, programs are first read from drive storage before being executed.
  • Save Money - Even if your PC has no hard disk (ex, broken hard disk), you can still boot Puppy via CD or USB and continue working. Old PCs that no longer work with new systems will still work good-as-new with Puppy.
  • Do More - Puppy boots in less than a minute, even in old PCs, and it does not require antivirus software. Administering Puppy is quick and minimal. With Puppy, you just have to take care of your data, which you can easily save to USB flash (Then forget about your operating system!). Your data can be read by other computers.
  • Do Magic -Help your friends suffering from computer malware by booting Puppy and removing malware from their PC (use antivirus that is built-in or can be installed in Puppy). Example - bad Autorun.inf is easily removed by Puppy (Just delete it as well as its companion exe program). If your friend thinks that she has lost data from her corrupted hard disk, boot Puppy and try saving her data!
  • Carry Anywhere (Portable) - Because Puppy is able to live in CD/DVD or USB flash, as well as save data to these same devices, you can carry your programs and data with you.

Are you now ready for Puppy? Keep these important reminders before using Puppy:

 

  • You don't have to install Puppy (to hard disk) to use it. Simply burn the ISO to CD/DVD and boot the PC or laptop with it. Once booted, you can then install it to USB flash (see the Setup menu), so you can use it for booting the PC when a CD is not available.
  • You don't have to save data to hard drive to work with Puppy. You can save data to USB flash or even to Internet storage (like www.drop.io ). When installed to USB flash, Puppy consumes only a little over 100 MB, or about 256 MB with OpenOffice. You can use the same USB flash (where Puppy is installed) for saving data.

The Puppy Linux files are primarily hosted by ibiblio.org and its mirror nluug.nl, with these links:http://ftp.nluug.nl/...str/puppylinux/

CURRENT RELEASE: Find LuPu 5.1.1 in the puppy-5.1.1 folder.

 

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay

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USMC-Retired

agree with Dave

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Cipro

I'm pretty sure suggesting Linux to a guy who's having trouble making XP run is not the best idea. I'm not a anti-Linux zealot, I'm posting this from Ubuntu using Google Chrome for Linux.

 

 

  • He needs to stop booting the old OS ASAP.
  • He should get the new Windows installation activated if it's not already.
  • He needs to chkdsk and properly mount the old drive.
  • Unhide all files, hidden and system.

 

 

I'm not much good at tech support though. I always end up just going and fixing it myself.

Edited by locktite

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USMC-Retired

just giving him the solutions he is looking for. I personally would have just slaved the old drive via USB.

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Cipro

just giving him the solutions he is looking for. I personally would have just slaved the old drive via USB.

 

Yeah you're clearly more experienced with IT type situations than I am, I generally try to only worry about my own machines.

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UZI

I'm pretty sure suggesting Linux to a guy who's having trouble making XP run is not the best idea. I'm not a anti-Linux zealot, I'm posting this from Ubuntu using Google Chrome for Linux.

 

 

  • He needs to stop booting the old OS ASAP.
  • He should get the new Windows installation activated if it's not already.
  • He needs to chkdsk and properly mount the old drive.
  • Unhide all files, hidden and system.

 

 

I'm not much good at tech support though. I always end up just going and fixing it myself.

Point 1 - As I have already said. I have stopped & it is now running as a slave with no problems

Point 2 - That is what I am asking for help with

Point 3 - As above, the old drive is working fine. It is mounted properly

Point 4 - All files are of course unhidden. I still dont have access to the Windows files until activated.

 

My PC is running fine with 240gb HDD (C & D) running as master with XP and my 80gb (E & F) as the slave but unable to get to some info on. If I cant get it then I will just reformat & use as a back up HDD.

 

David & Tim - Thanks, I will have a look at Puppy Linux. Software side of things usually my stong point, it's hardware that I don't get at times. I didn't slave via USB as I already have a portable USB drive that only boots when it feels like it on my laptop & just sits and flashes its light when I connect to my pc. Not trusting that method again.

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