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Boss Ross

David,

 

You have many good ideas, thanks! I found your entry about the prices for getting electric hooked up, that was good to have, Thanks! I have one main question about these panels and glass. Obviously they are not made in the PI, so what kind of taxes and fees are we talking about to get them into the country? Would anyone in the PI know how to properly install any of this? Looking forward to hearing from you, and meeting you once we finally get there!

 

Ross

 

 

 

I have been researching into Instead of building a house, then adding Photovoltaic panels, you choose a roofing system that provides Electricity.

136W_BIPV_Flexible_Solar_Panel_4mm_thick.jpg

Shadow tolerance 136W BIPV Flexible Solar Panels, Floding Solar Modules, Amorphous Solar Panels

 

FOB Price: US $598 - 688 / Unit ($4.39 - 5.05/watt)

solar-panel-bipv-module-solar-tile-bipv.jpg

Solar Panel Bipv Module Solar Tile (BIPV)

 

The solar panel BCT55-5 is particularly suitable for sheds and patios. The unique design of the frames makes the whole solar array waterproof so to keep the rain off. The solar bike sheds and solar patios cannot only keep rain off the bikes, make shades for you but also can generate electricity to reduce the electricity bill. The solar sheds can be used in shools, homes and company. Environment- friendly.

Electrical Characteristics BCT55-5

Maximum power at STC(Pmax) 55W

Optimum operating voltage(Vmp) 7.05V

Optimum operating current(Imp) 7.80A

Open-circuit voltage(Voc) 9.50V

Short-circuit current(Isc) 8.27A

Short-circuit current temperature coefficient (0.065

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david why dont you buy one and tell us how much you save and if it works after a few years we can all start buying them... but do hire a guard to protect your mirror or it will be for sale at the loca

It is very difficult to estimate energy costs over the next 20 years. I think the sensible system at the present cost point would only allow you to run power at an "emergency" level at night. I also t

'thebob', I think the KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) principle needs to be applied here,   Liquid Salt, is indeed a method for storing heat, but not very practical for a home supply set up. Also not

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David_LivinginTalisay

David,

 

You have many good ideas, thanks! I found your entry about the prices for getting electric hooked up, that was good to have, Thanks! I have one main question about these panels and glass. Obviously they are not made in the PI, so what kind of taxes and fees are we talking about to get them into the country? Would anyone in the PI know how to properly install any of this? Looking forward to hearing from you, and meeting you once we finally get there!

 

Ross

 

 

 

 

 

Ross,

 

The Internet has a wealth of information on how to install all sorts of things and Photo Voltaic roofing is no exception.

 

I particularly like the idea of this thin-film solar cell (TFSC) technology. Whilst the output per square meter might not be as high as conventional crystilline type Silicon Solar Cells, there is a lot of potential for reduced prices, since this technology can be sprayed onto plactic, so could be produced much like printing magazines, almost. What is more these photo voltaic 'inks' are semi transparent and different 'colours' responding to different parts of lights wavelengths, can increase the voltage utput, improving the efficiency close to conventional Solar cells. Costs should come down as this technology matures and develops and more completion enters the market.

http://www.google.co...593f3771f9185ec

Perhaps there are 'Patent' issues on this Technology, as it appears to come from the USA. Even companies offering such stick on, flexible thin film solar call product in China, cant offer lower pricing to what I found in USA on special 'Promo' pricing, as they import the stick on flexible thin-film solar cell (TFSC)?

 

A thin-film solar cell (TFSC), also called a thin-film photovoltaic cell(TFPV), is a solar cell that is made by depositing one or more thin layers (thin film) of photovoltaic material on a substrate. The thickness range of such a layer is wide and varies from a few nanometers to tens of micrometers.

This is why I am looking @ BIPV Solar.

Put 'tinted' windows in you house, that generate electricity. You want shade from the sun on a patio and to keep the rain off, then install Voltage producing covering. Build a roof on your house that produces electricity. Whilst the cost might be higher, built using 'integrated' PV, that gives wind, rain and thermal insulation protection, that generates electricity, it will cost rather less than adding traditional silicaon solar cells covered in glass and have heavy and expensive frames, to a 'traditional roof' (that might need strengthening to take the weight and fitting of such Solar Panels)

 

 

 

Building integrated photovoltaics

A silicon thin film technology is being developed for building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) in the form of semitransparent solar cells which can be applied as window glazing. These cells function as window tintingwhile generating electricity.Thin film solar panels are commercially available for installation onto the roofs of buildings, either applied onto the finished roof, or integrated into the roof covering. The advantage over tradition PV panels is that they are very low in weight, are not subject to wind lifting, and can be walked on (with care). The comparable disadvantages are increased cost and reduced efficiency.

 

 

220px-Thin_Film_Flexible_Solar_PV_Installation_2.JPG

 

Thin film photovoltaic panels being installed onto a roof

 

 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ZNgP_U64a8

 

2 kinds of solar panels explained by Betsy Ferris Wyman of Sundog Solar. Partial shade affects the performance of Photovoltaic Silicon ingot PV panels. This company specializes in home installation of solar panels in the low-sun environment of the Northeast USA. Thurston Sack and Ernie Tetrault are our hosts in this weekly educational program for public access and cable access stations across the U.S.

 

 

 

Nanosolar_logo.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanosolar

Nanosolar is a developer of solar power technology. Based in San Jose, CA, Nanosolar has developed and commercialized a low-cost printable solar cell manufacturing process. The company started selling panels mid-December 2007, and plans to sell them at around $1 per watt. When first announced that was just one fifth the price of the silicon cells, but in 2010 brand name silicon cells sell from around $1.70 reducing Nanosolar's cost advantage significantly.[2][3][4]

Uploaded by HouseOfStrength on 2 Nov 2007

 

****Since all the comments seem to be either 100% positive or 100% negative about this solar technology i would like to clear up some some misconceptions. First of all I'd imagine that takes years to set up the the precision equipment for 2 of the largest solar panel manufacturing plants in the world and be able to print solar photo cells as fast as newspaper. After the plant was completed in 2007 the first focus was on commercial uses and their first costumers where municipal utility companies. This sounds to me like a good business tactic to help you establish a successful business from the start. Next they started offering it to electrical contractors as part of a beta testing process so they can work out the kinks that arise from scaling down their panels from large commercial ones to the ones that you can use on your house. That is where were at today. After the beta testing they will start offering them to the general public. Their website even has a place to enter your email address to be notified when this technology will be available to you the home owner. Its a process and that apparently some people out there believe happens over night. This company immediately got more financial backing then needed. Google is one of the biggest investors so I believe its all legitimate. There are two benefits from the use of alternative energy. It will save you money but also it means that energy produced is done so with out creating pollution. This is good for everybody. Even though the technology isn't yet available for you to install on your home to help save money the fact that utility companies use it to create energy still means means less pollution for us all. . ***** New technology uses cheaper materials instead of expensive silicon crystals. These new solar cells are projected to cost 1/10th of what the more expensive silicon cells cost.

 

 

 

So the BIG question is why are there not more companies producing such 'print on plastic' using these hight tech PV 'inks', that produce thin, flexible, shade tolerant photo cells?.

 

 

Installing clean, reliable, inflation-proof solar power is easier than ever, thanks to the invention of thin-film photovoltaic (PV) laminates that can be bonded directly onto metal roofing panels. Unlike crystalline PV material, there's no need for obtrusive racks and heavy, expensive glass.

 

 

Instead, unbreakable thin-film PV is produced using amorphous silicon, encapsulated in Teflon and other polymers.

 

http://www.uni-solar.com/index.asp

http://www.etaengine.../unisolar.shtml

http://www.mhi.co.jp...a-si/index.html

http://www.bigfrogmo...larproducts.htm

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay
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  • 4 weeks later...

Well written and informative. I moved out into the Sonoran Desert and built my dream home by myself. I was a life time member of mother earth news alternative living magazine and learned alot. I learned that there are a lot of great ideas but they all have to be managed by whoever is available if the "genius" is disabled or becomes sick. Being the operator of a home electrical generation plant is just what a 40 yr old wife wants to learn to do. So all is naught. In my house in the Ph. I live in the mountains because its cooler. I am taking solar powered lights (NorthernTools [email protected]) and am lighting each room with one. Secondly, I am buying 108 L.E.D. E27 bulbs/220v for all sockets. Thirdly. I am replacing the refrigerator with a smaller higher effeciency unit. I have a stainless tank painted flat black for my hot water and a shiney one for my cool water. The cook walks to market everyday sometimes twice and so do I for exercise and we don't store much food. My mother in law runs the perverbial Sari-Sari store to cover the costs of our food. Business is how you can look at energy also. If its so damn expensive there is no market so bet on the fact that it will always be just in reach of concumers. I don't have to stay up into the dark, I don't have to drive a 4wheel drive one ton Ford F950, I don't have to store food to make it through the blizzard, I don't have to power the filter and sweep on the swimming pool...............relax, don't take life too seriously cause you can't get out of it alive.

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  • 4 weeks later...
big RB

The solar A/C sounds good. But the link to OLX is expired. They make it in Bacolod, which is on this island and a lot simpliar than Cebu, so I would probably just drive around there and get it from the sorce. Do you know them?

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  • 3 weeks later...
Paul

I'm very interested in this topic as well.

 

I just acquired a 3,000 watt voltage inverter. I am starting to do some research on purchasing a solar panel large enough to charge it, as well as calculating appropriate battery capacity to supply the load.

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aussiedon

I'm very interested in this topic as well.

 

I just acquired a 3,000 watt voltage inverter. I am starting to do some research on purchasing a solar panel large enough to charge it, as well as calculating appropriate battery capacity to supply the load.

 

You will probably need a few solar panels and suitable battery or batteries, i was told Electric forklift batteries are the go,

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Markham

I'm very interested in this topic as well.

 

I just acquired a 3,000 watt voltage inverter. I am starting to do some research on purchasing a solar panel large enough to charge it, as well as calculating appropriate battery capacity to supply the load.

Paul

 

I looked into this some months ago.

 

Home Depot sells starter kits which consist of 4 or 8 panels and the necessary controller/charger(s), but cheap they ain't! But they can be sent to the Guam store for collection or onwards shipment via BB. The problem will be finding suitable batteries which would need to be 12v. An array of Motolite Excel 70Ah (connected in parallel) would be okay and they cost around P6500 each. Deep-discharge batteries would be better and Motolite do make them but expect to pay around P8500 for a 50Ah unit and they'd be special-ordered from Manila.

 

Your 3KW inverter may be insufficient for a whole-house setup as, at 220v, it will deliver a maximum of 13 amps.

 

 

 

 

Mark

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This is a subject I know zero about but on another forum this (extracts) conversation took place. I offer it purely for information purposes

 

This subject is fascinating, and i`ve done some research on it, a Dutch friend living here in Isabela got into it quite heavily only to be disappointed with the results, he brought good quality units from Holland in a shipping container 5 years ago, one crapped out, he bought more from china, they never lasted a year, so now only uses his remaining panel to power lighting on his long perimeter wall and a couple of lights as emergency in the house, to light his way to the gen i installed for him, and Hans is very smart with electrical and electronic stuff. The main stumbling block will always be in storing power, batteries are costly, degrade, panels degrade and need periodic replacement, it`s a very expensive game and considering 80--90% of our monthly bills come from ac and refs, cheap lighting makes very little difference, it still interests me though and would love to know the outcome, Wind? anyone with coastal aspect and elevated, that`s the affordable ticket.
Hi,

There are indeed a lot of disappointed people with their systems. I am surprised how many are in hot climates. In the north they seem to be reliable. I have looked at 10 year old systems that still produce well. Panels can fail for several reasons, moisture, oxygen, bad wiring, poor seals, etc. I expect many are made too light, and when they flex the seal cracks and allow moisture in. Also, they dont work well when hot, so maybe they need a little mid day mist to cool them down. They are often sealed with EVA film, or lacquer, so maybe it fails at constant high temps. People in the southern US sometimes spray theirs at 2 PM in the summer to cool them down and boost efficiency. I think a target is to be able to run your essentials, lights and refrigeration, when the power is out. Storage batteries are costly and have a short life of 5-6 years, but you can connect to the grid in some areas and get credit for what you dont use.

Yes they appear to be common problems, remember Isabela is one of the hottest provinces in the country, and also one of the most prone to very savage typhoons so they are subject to extremely harsh conditions, Hans after initial enthusiasm just plods along with what`s left. And yes i understand now they have integrated systems that will buy power from you ans pay back in credits. All i will say from my experiences here, id you can`t fix it yourself steer well away from high tech stuff, parts and people with knowledge to repair high end equipment are few and far between, and the frustration factor can give you very bad days. I may add all my working life mi have been in the power generating sector and after careful consideration i decided to steer clear, an option would be get a small inexpensive unit and fool about with it for a couple of years to better assess its potential. Keep it simple in agri based economies, some of the members here will no doubt recount horror stories of trying to get things repaired, good luck with it though, we all need hobbies!

 

You may find this site in Cebu helpful too.

 

SolarStar

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  • 3 months later...

I have a grown daughter that lives in Arizona, about 75 miles south of Phoenix. There a 3kw input would carry your A/C load, and most of the lessor load, almost half of the 24 hours in a day. At night, there, it cools off after sundown and they have a cooler season when A/C load is a bit less, so if the solar system completely replaced the grid for all daylight hours you would cut your electric bill by more than half. But with some storms, and days so hot that 3kw might not do it, that is pretty optomistic. The tax credits and a reversing meter that buys any surplus power you put back in the grid makes solar power more workable, in a place like the valley of the Sun Arizona. Here there is a bit different situation. A/C load really does not drop off much at night. In fact, in our house it goes up, as that is required to sleep. Storms and weather that reduces the solar powers efficency is way more common, and I do not beleave reversing meters are available here yet. Also I would need to see the typoon tests run on the dish as it needs to last a while to pay for itself. Using batteries is expensive, they need replacement too, and like the Prius electric car proved to be, may be the biggest poluter on the Earth (due to what is mined to make the batteries). Now that all said, here in the RP we got troubles with brown outs and quality of power delivery that makes this sound worth following, and it only needs to get close to become competitive. Price it at @$5,000.00 and they will sell faster than Honda 125's, that are harder to make.

I enjoy the coverage and will follow the updates on these and any other solar systems that come along. The solar A/C is very intresting.

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The solar A/C sounds good. But the link to OLX is expired. They make it in Bacolod, which is on this island and a lot simpliar than Cebu, so I would probably just drive around there and get it from the sorce. Do you know them?

 

They make what in Bacolod?

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