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It is a slap in the face the US citizen Filipino veterans get $15,000 while non-US citizens only get $9,000.

 

Veterans fought the same war, suffered the same atrocities and the continued injustice from the US government.

 

I am quite sure that some would say to take that up with the Philippine Government. How have they handled their own veterans' affairs?

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No, we were taught about the Philippine Indepedence Act (Tydings-McDuffie Act) that went into effect in 1935 initiated by one Manuel Quezon. It was the establishment of a transitional government (10-

no different then the french freedom fighters when the part of the war was done in the PHilippines the \freedom fighters went back to \their homes and the rest of the army went on to fight on another

Do you understand that the Philippines Islands at that time was an American Territory and Filipinos where Americans at the time ?   This is not only Philippine history, it is American History. Was'

.... yes they where. Do the math agian. This time use a calculator if you can't do the simple math in you head. Or even better count using your fingers. It is only 10 years to add.

 

I realize the placement on the time scale. Try not to be insulting.

 

The fact of the matter is that math plays no part into it. The Philippines was a commonwealth during that time. Commonwealth does not equal citizenship.

 

Kthxbai.

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According to this website on A Short History of the 1st & 2nd Filipino Infantry Regiments of the U. S. Army in World War II

 

There was a Filipino Infantry that did fight in New Guinea, these where Filipinos where where already in the US and Hawaii who volunteered.

 

Taken from your linked article:

 

The Tydings-McDuffie Act of 1934 treated the Filipinos in the U.S. as aliens. Although the Philippine Commonwealth Constitution permitted the United States to draft Filipinos in the Philippines to defend American interests there, Filipinos in the United States, quite ironically, were exempt from military service.

 

Commonwealth =/= citizenship

 

 

I only linked that article to maybe put light on Filipinos who served did not only fight in the Philippines but else where. Honestly I am not even sure if anything in that article is true or I would of posted what I thought to be true myself and not linked it as reference.

 

Ok so Commonwealth of the US =/= US Nationality. I stand corrected. They where not US Citizens the Filipinos where of US Nationality.

Edited by Balay
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Ok so Commonwealth of the US =/= US citizenship. So you are confirming that Filipinos during the time of the Philippines being a common wealth of the US in the Philippines were US Citizens.

 

No, I am not.

 

The symbol "=/=" (which is an non-ASCII version of '≠')means 'NOT equal to'.

 

Yay for learning!

 

Got it from my math teacher. :rofl:

Edited by Mailman
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smokey

Remember the Philippines didn't gain full independence from the United States until after the war. Possibly the PI vets were also attached to the US bases?

 

Andrew

These were men who served in the US military during WWII...not just Filipinos who were fighting the Japanese in the Philippines. The beef here is that foreign nationals serving in our armed forces were treated differently than US citizens serving next to them. I have to agree with them. If they served, and the US government is honoring their service by giving them money, then the money should be the same for all that served.

 

 

 

 

NO the problem is Foreign Nationals serving the US military but only as it was fought in the Philippines , my grandfather rwas not a US citz for many years and had to learn English first so when WW2 came along it was a chance for all Foreign nationals to become US citz. But my grandfather had to fight anywhere the US went not just in his home turf... The difference between a US military solider and a freedom fighter was the freedom fighter only fought in his own country. I am not saying they don't deserve more but equal well to be equal they would of had to fight everywhere they were needed and if this is not so how fair was it to the other foreign nationals that fought in many countries not just their own home turf

Edited by robert51
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smokey

There was a Filipino Infantry that did fight in New Guinea, these where Filipinos where where already in the US and Hawaii who volunteered.

 

 

 

yes you answered your own question even these Filipinos were different then the freedom fighters when a Filipino US military came here to fight was he allow to stop fighting after the war moved on to another island? Of course not all Soldiers boarded the boats and went on to fight many more battles after the Philippines

Edited by robert51
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Of course not all Soldiers boarded the boats and went on to fight many more battles after the Philippines.

 

 

Maybe not all but some Filipino soldiers did.

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The difference between a military solider and a freedom fighter was the freedom fighter only fought in his own country. I am not saying they don't deserve more but equal well to be equal they would of had to fight everywhere they were needed and if this is not so how fair was it to the other foreign nationals that fought in many countries not just their own home turf

 

 

It is not the common wealth Filipino fighters fault that the US did'nt send them to other places.

 

The Filipinos who served were entitled to full veterans

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smokey

Of course not all Soldiers boarded the boats and went on to fight many more battles after the Philippines.

 

 

Maybe not all but some Filipino soldiers did.

 

 

 

 

 

I understand your feeling on this matter but one thing you assumed was that the people of the Philippines were the only foreign nationals to fight with the US. My family was Green card holders also US citz was offered to any and all foreign nationals living in the US and or its territory's if they joined the military, I served in Viet Nam with a guy from Cuba who was promised his US citz. if he served in the army so when the US came to the Philippines and asked and accepted the people to become soldiers that would of meant when the fighting stopped here they would still be in the military and would have to go to the next island . . But because they were not longer obligated to fight after the Philippines they most likely were considered freedom fighters working for the US instead of US military you said your father served and received his benefits but I bet he served in more then just the Philippines. I tried to have my step daughter who is a nurse join the US military but they stopped that when Cory asked the US to leave, before that a Filipino could join the US military and after service be granted US citz. I sure wish that was still possible it would be a benefit for the US military to get all of these educated Filipinos and it would bea good job for them.

Edited by robert51
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smokey

The difference between a military solider and a freedom fighter was the freedom fighter only fought in his own country. I am not saying they don't deserve more but equal well to be equal they would of had to fight everywhere they were needed and if this is not so how fair was it to the other foreign nationals that fought in many countries not just their own home turf

 

 

It is not the common wealth Filipino fighters fault that the US did'nt send them to other places.

 

The Filipinos who served were entitled to full veterans' benefits by reason of their active service with the US armed forces. Many were wounded in battle and many died in battle serving under the US armed forces. Even after Japan's surrender, the Congress also enacted the Armed Forces Voluntary Recruitment Act of 1945 for the purpose of sending Filipino troops to occupy enemy lands, and to oversee military installations at various overseas locations. These Filipino troops were authorized to receive pay and allowances for services performed throughout the Western Pacific.

 

But then in February 18, 1946, the Congress enacted the Rescission Act of 1946, now codified as Section 107 of Title 38 of the United States Code. The 1946 Act deemed that the service performed by these Filipino veterans would not be recognized as "active service" for the purpose of any U.S. law conferring "rights, privileges, or benefits."

 

On May 27, 1946, the Congress enacted the Second Supplemental Surplus Appropriations Rescission Act, which duplicated the language that had eliminated Filipino veterans' benefits under the First Rescission Act. Thus, Filipino veterans who fought in the service of the United States during World War II have been precluded from receiving most veterans' benefits that had been available to them before 1946, and that are available to all other veterans of our armed forces regardless of race, national origin, or citizenship status.

 

So the US told Filipinos to sign up in under the Armed Forces Voluntary Recruitment Act of 1945, then in 1946 told them, sorry we changed our minds, you won't be getting any benifits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

in order to receive any military benefits a soldier first will join and have an enlistment contract and if he serves and if he is honorably discharged only then is he afforded any benefits contracts are anywhere from 3 years to 6 years and then have to be renewed so that means the fighters here if they were US military would have to serve out their enlistment to the number of years they enlisted for.. Even though I served in Viet nam for two tours I did not receive any benefits even after Viet nam till I finished my contract in Texas. So after Viet Nam I was not let out and it stands to reason the fighters in Philippines were not let out after the Philippines and I don't think it was a case of the military not needing them or wanting them but the fact that they were not in the US military but fighting as the Philippines army. During WW2 I don't think there was even such a thing as a set time contract it was your in till the war is over period. If I use your reasoning I should have been let out of the army after I was done in Viet Nam but I still had 9 months left to serve in order to receive my benefits.

Edited by robert51
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Commonwealth =/= citizenship

Sorry, Mailman. I'm not sure that's right. Puetro Rico is a commonwealth of the United States. made so by the same law that established the Philpines as a commonwealth. The citizens of Puerto Rico are also citizens of the US. There were originally three commonwealths resulting from the Spanish American War...Cuba, the Philippines and Puerto Rico. Cuba and the Philippines opted for independence while Puerto Rico remained a commonwealth. Puerto Ricans travel using US passports, vote in elections and do pretty much everything other US citizens do. However, they have their own olympics teams, field their own contestants for beauty pageants and don't have to pay US federal income tax (because they don't have voting representatives in Congress). At any time, Puerto Ricans can vote to become independent, become a state or to stay as a commonwealth. Puerto Rico has voted five times to remain a commonwealth of the US.

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OK - I will take the blame - the quotes are hosed so I can't put this in where it belongs so let me address some individuals as best I can -

 

Robert51 - You seem to have a problem in understanding that prior to July 4, 1946 - The Republic of the Philippines Islands did not exist. From 1898 to 1935 the Philippines were a colony of the United States, as was America a Colony of England prior to July 4, 1776. In 1935 the Philippines became a commonwealth of the United States - as a commonwealth, they had some independence, but they still reported to the United States -

 

Douglas MacArthur was the Military Governor of the Philippine Islands - he reported to the Chief of Staff and the President of the US. As war approached - MacArthur requested more troops - but the US was fearful that if Great Britain failed to stop Germany troops would be needed in the United States - so MacArthur had to defend the Philippines with 10,000 American Troops, about 12,000 Philippine Scouts (a Philippine unit established in 1901 for self defense reporting to the US Military) and in July of 1941 FDR authorized the Draft of some 250,000 Filipinos, into the United States Army. Since these draftees and the Philippine Scouts were not citizens, FDR authorized that they be treated as American Armed Forces, even if they were not citizens.

 

You pointed out that your grandfather or perhaps a Great Uncle were sent to other lands to fight - unlike Filipinos who only fought in the Philippines - you were in the military?Did you have a vote in the decision as to where you would be stationed? I didn't - nor did the Philippine Scouts or Draftees - but since they were formed by the US Gov't for the specific purpose of defending the Philippine Islands on behalf of the US Gov't - need I say more?

 

So now war is approaching and there are a total of 272,000 troops to defend the Philippine Islands - Have you done any reading about the Second World War? The Japanese, German, Italians had been practicing for war since the mid 30's - the Philippines had a total of 22,000 combat tested (local uprisings) troops - and 250K Draftees - didn't look good - Quoting from - Hyper War - http://www.ibiblio.o...-C-Philippines/

 

"Capture of the Philippine Islands was crucial to Japan's effort to control the Southwest Pacific, seize the resource-rich Dutch East Indies, and protect its Southeast Asia flank. Its strategy called for roughly simultaneous attacks on Malaya, Thailand, American-held Guam and Wake, Hong Kong, Singapore, the Philippines, and Hawaii. Although the aim of the air strike on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941 was to destroy the U.S. Pacific Fleet in its home port, the others were meant to serve as preludes to full-scale invasion and occupation.The well-coordinated Japanese campaign, spread across great reaches of the Pacific, progressed with astonishing rapidity. The small U.S. Army and Marine garrisons on Guam and Wake surrendered on 10 and 22 December, respectively, and the British forces in Hong Kong on 26 December. Singapore, the supposedly impregnable British bastion on the Malay Peninsula, capitulated on 15 February 1942. Following lightning amphibious landings in Thailand and Burma, Japanese forces pushed to the northwest, threatening India. Only in the Philippines did the combined U.S.-Filipino units mount a prolonged resistance, holding out with grim determination for five months."

 

I would like to suggest that it was because of the fighting spirit and will of the Filipino Scouts and the draftees that US held out as long as they did - if it wasn't for the Filipinos the war may have had the same result, but it would have taken significantly longer.

 

You brought up another point trying to distinguish Filipino Regular Army units, were some how different from other Army units and maybe they didn't deserve to be treated like other men who served during the Second World War - why when MacArthur "returned" to the Philippines didn't they load up on boats and move to other Islands -like Okinawa -

 

This was the order of the major battles in the Philippine Islands

 

 

Leyte 17 October 1944 - 1 July 1945

 

Luzon 15 December 1944 - 4 July 1945

 

Southern Philippines 27 February - 4 July 1945

 

Last Major Battle of the Pacific War

 

Okinawa 26 March - 2 July 1945

 

That was the last major landings prior to an anticipated invasion of the Japanese homeland - some time in early 1946

 

But then there was the matter of Atomic Bombs

 

War with Japan ended August 14, 1945

 

In Europe Armies moved from one engagement to another

 

But in the Pacific due primarily to the fact that the Japanese usually fought to the last man, the same units did not take part in battles in a chronological time frame - for example the First Marine Division took the major role in Guadalcanal, but it was the 2nd Marine Division that took on Tarawa. Iwo Jima was the responsibility of the 3rd, 4th and 5th Marine Divisions - Likewise Army units that took part in battles in New Guinea did not take part in the Philippine action.

 

Those Filipino Scouts and regular army draftees that did not die in the Bataan Death March, did not die in the POW camps, did not die fighting along side American Guerillas, hooked up with MacArthur's Forces when he re-invaded the Philippine Islands and continued to fight until MacArthur declared an end to the resistance on July 4th, 1945.

BTW - Two Filipinos won the Congressional Medal of Honor in the Philippines during WWII

Another Member of LinC questioned why these Vets should get benefits when current Vets aren't getting our COLA Adjustments

 

Whether they get benefits or not isn't going to impact my increase at all. I am not going to get an increase this year because the Cost Of Living based on some formula that the Federal Reserve Bank and Social Security uses, has determined that there is no increase - I am not getting an increase in Social Security either -

 

Yes, some times I am a nerd when it comes to History - I love American History and have a thing for WWII - I am happy searching the Internet or a library looking for material I have never seen before - on topics that are of interest to me - now that I am living in a country that has had such close ties with American since 1898 - Spanish American War - I find it interesting to read about it and their people.

I find it surprising that other people don't have that same level of interest - but such is life

Mike

Edited by mpt1947
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Commonwealth =/= citizenship

Sorry, Mailman. I'm not sure that's right. Puetro Rico is a commonwealth of the United States. made so by the same law that established the Philpines as a commonwealth. The citizens of Puerto Rico are also citizens of the US. There were originally three commonwealths resulting from the Spanish American War...Cuba, the Philippines and Puerto Rico. Cuba and the Philippines opted for independence while Puerto Rico remained a commonwealth. Puerto Ricans travel using US passports, vote in elections and do pretty much everything other US citizens do. However, they have their own olympics teams, field their own contestants for beauty pageants and don't have to pay US federal income tax (because they don't have voting representatives in Congress). At any time, Puerto Ricans can vote to become independent, become a state or to stay as a commonwealth. Puerto Rico has voted five times to remain a commonwealth of the US.

 

Yes, they are considered citizens... with all the amenities and benefits of actual US citizens with the exception of paying federal taxes and voting in presidential elections (as you stated).

 

However, their commonwealth was granted in the early 50's under different terms and circumstances than the Philippines. The JonesShafroth Act on 1917 is what gave Puerto Ricans US citizenship, This law had nothing to do with the Philippines. Their commonwealth came much later.

 

 

The Northern Marianas, the United States' other commonwealth, was established in 1978 was its people were granted US citizenship in 1986. They, likewise, do not get to participate in presidential elections.

 

Just because these commonwealths were gratned their citizenship sometime down the road doesn't mean that commonwealth equals citizenship. It is not a guarantee. The Philippines didn't want it. So be it. Had the Philiippines chosen to stay under the US, it may certainly have turned out that they eventually would be granted citizenship. Regardless, commonwealth does not equate to citizenship... a potential pathway maybe.

Edited by Mailman
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smokey

Commonwealth =/= citizenship

Sorry, Mailman. I'm not sure that's right. Puetro Rico is a commonwealth of the United States. made so by the same law that established the Philpines as a commonwealth. The citizens of Puerto Rico are also citizens of the US. There were originally three commonwealths resulting from the Spanish American War...Cuba, the Philippines and Puerto Rico. Cuba and the Philippines opted for independence while Puerto Rico remained a commonwealth. Puerto Ricans travel using US passports, vote in elections and do pretty much everything other US citizens do. However, they have their own olympics teams, field their own contestants for beauty pageants and don't have to pay US federal income tax (because they don't have voting representatives in Congress). At any time, Puerto Ricans can vote to become independent, become a state or to stay as a commonwealth. Puerto Rico has voted five times to remain a commonwealth of the US.

 

 

 

 

 

your right but your missing the point the Freedom fighters fought with and along side the Americans while they were in thePhilippines helping the US and freeing their own country of the invading Japan but that does not make them US soldiers sorry but it does not ... a US soldier even yourself must know you enlist for a time period and you go to war anywhere anytime so if the Philippines fighters were US soldiers they would of not been released after the war was over in the Philippines but would of boarded the ships along with the 1,000 of other us soldiers to go to the next island ... To reap any benefits from an enlistment a person has to finish his enlistment . So for them to have been us soldiers they would have had to join and then be discharged and as the war was not over for the US I don't think the military would have not used these soldiers to go to the next island to carry on the fight... And as it's been stated after the Philippines Maybe the US did not need the Filipino soldiers any more is still wrong... After Viet Nam my duty was done and I still had to finish my enlistment in order to finish my contract to be entitled to my benfits even thought they had no job for me...

 

Edited by robert51
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smokey

mpt1947

 

 

 

 

I am sorry but your either in the US Army or your not ... Even if your in the Army, your NOT entitled to benefits until your honorably discharged , So were the freedom fighters US soldiers with enlistments or just part time fighters .. I like your way better of course because after Viet Nam I could of just said hey the fighting is over I am out of here,but alas I would have been AWOL and then not received any bennies? I think if they were US soldiers after the Philippines they would of had to still go where ever they were told and that could of been to the US to Europe anywhere I never heard of a group of soldiers who had a choice on if they wanted to stay in the army or not

As to us having a special relationship well from where i sit its been a one way special relationship and americans are not on the receiving end

Edited by robert51
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