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Take up the White Man's burden--

Send forth the best ye breed--

Go bind your sons to exile

To serve your captives' need;

To wait in heavy harness,

On fluttered folk and wild--

Your new-caught, sullen peoples,

Half-devil and half-child.

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No, we were taught about the Philippine Indepedence Act (Tydings-McDuffie Act) that went into effect in 1935 initiated by one Manuel Quezon. It was the establishment of a transitional government (10-

no different then the french freedom fighters when the part of the war was done in the PHilippines the \freedom fighters went back to \their homes and the rest of the army went on to fight on another

Do you understand that the Philippines Islands at that time was an American Territory and Filipinos where Americans at the time ?   This is not only Philippine history, it is American History. Was'

The vast majority of Viet Nam Vets can prove they were in country - it is part of our DD214 -

 

I have a friend who was in the Navy - on a Minesweeper and they did some covert ops near the DMZ - hush hush and stuff

 

It is not on his DD214 Now at the age of 63 he has some PTSD and DIabetes - no help

 

Luckily I happened to run into him at the PX on the Air Force side of the DaDang Air Base - I wrote to his County Vets Officer to that effect

Hopefully that will do it.

 

I did see a lot of guys in Country - I bet a lot of us did....

 

 

CAVEAT: FOIA and US Patriot Act language allows for the "editing" of documents released by US govt even tho said docs are about you...

relying on current "renditions" of service records often leaves a vet seriously lacking evidence in support of a claim...bottom line: the process is administrative and altho a court decision may compel the cognizant authority to review their policy and procedure, it will ultimately be the prerogative of the responsible agency to pursue as much feckery as they want...and it is a long and documented trail of feckery

furthermore: the legal pursuit of claims often times exceeds in costs the original compensatory value

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smokey

So if these fighters were considered AMERICAN citizens as you say .. then why when the troops left the Philippines to go to the next island to fight did these AMERICAN CITIZEN fighters not have to go also... because they were FREEDOM fighters and they were fighting for the Philippines not the US ... They deserve what is due but on a moral ground the Philippines should have held the other amercians not born here who died here the same gratitdue they now demand,, let ssee i will take duel citz. that would be a good start

 

I am not the only one who says these fighters where American's. It is party of history. It is a well known fact that based on the Treaty of Paris.

 

U.S. President McKinley justified the annexation of the Philippines by saying that it was "... a gift from the gods" and that since "they were unfit for self-government, ... there was nothing left for the US to do but to take them all, and to educate the Filipinos, and uplift and civilize and Christianize them", in spite of the Philippines having been already Christianized by the Spanish over the course of several centuries.

 

Why the troops did'nt travel to other islands I don't know. Maybe someone else can answer that. Maybe it was a tactical decision by the egomaniac General MacArthur.

 

Do you understand the Philippine Islands was an American Territory at the time and the Filipino people where considered Americans ?

 

 

 

 

 

no different then the french freedom fighters when the part of the war was done in the PHilippines the \freedom fighters went back to \their homes and the rest of the army went on to fight on another island... If the \freedom fighters were US military they should of gone on to fight for the US as the war was not over after the Philippines... I am well aware of the lies and bullshit all governments spit out , i am sure when the troops were leaving the Philippines the people of the Philippines were not standing on the dock saying ... \This is NOT your country so get out.... somewhere along the line of time people forget that to understand people you need to walk in their shoes for a while.. I hope all who suffered duing the war and all the wars that follow get the support they are due... My grandfathers brothers name was Robert and i was named after him in his memory so it does piss me off at times when a totally stupid local says , your dont belong here you were not born here

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JamesMusslewhite

So Filipinos want compensation from the US for their part in fighting the occupational Japanese forces that invaded their country. They told them there were only certain Filipino units and members who would receive it, and they needed proper proof that they were part of these recognized units. They had far more claims than those that served in those Units (Big Surprise) evidently none had died and may have defied science and cellularly mutated increasing their numbers. The whole process has be plagued with fixers, false filings, unsubstantiated claims, and outright fraud. So now they want to Sue the US for their part in saving their country and culture. Wow to get a Filipino to Fight for themselves or Vote, you have to bribe them first? Pride and Loyalty has a price? priceless

 

 

And here we American disabled veterans can not even get a Cost of Living Increase - "AGAIN"

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Headshot

Remember the Philippines didn't gain full independence from the United States until after the war. Possibly the PI vets were also attached to the US bases?

 

Andrew

These were men who served in the US military during WWII...not just Filipinos who were fighting the Japanese in the Philippines. The beef here is that foreign nationals serving in our armed forces were treated differently than US citizens serving next to them. I have to agree with them. If they served, and the US government is honoring their service by giving them money, then the money should be the same for all that served.

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So Filipinos want compensation from the US for their part in fighting the occupational Japanese forces that invaded their country. So now they want to Sue the US for their part in saving their country and culture.

 

 

 

Do you understand that the Philippines Islands at that time was an American Territory and Filipinos where Americans at the time ?

 

This is not only Philippine history, it is American History. Was'nt this taught in American History class ? Did'nt you pay attention that day ?

 

It was'nt until 1947, after WWII that the Philippines became it's own republic.

 

You mean the culture of 150 years of Islam, 300 years in the Spanish convent, 50 years of Hollywood plus 5 years of the Jap occupation coupled with the Chinese, Indian and now the Korean invasion !

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Do you understand that the Philippines Islands at that time was an American Territory and Filipinos where Americans at the time ?

 

This is not only Philippine history, it is American History. Was'nt this taught in American History class ? Did'nt you pay attention that day ?

 

It was'nt until 1947, after WWII that the Philippines became it's own republic.

 

No, we were taught about the Philippine Indepedence Act (Tydings-McDuffie Act) that went into effect in 1935 initiated by one Manuel Quezon. It was the establishment of a transitional government (10-year period) with the intent to totally handover control to the new Philippine Government. In the interim, the US would maintain a military presence and was given authority over the Philippine military forces... which were subsequently called into action to defend the country.

 

This is the Filipino-initated act that stripped Filipinos of American citizenship and it occured almost a decade before Japan invaded.

 

Or so I was told.

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The Mason

All the history information is interesting, but I don't see how its relevant to the lawsuit in the OP. I think its pretty clear that the US reneged on its promise to Filipino vets. However, the time to sue about that was in 1946 when it happened, not nearly 65 years later.

 

The US realized that they treated Filipino vets poorly and made a goodwill gesture offering lump sum payments to surviving vets.

 

In my opinion, since the payments were a good-will gesture and not legally required, lawsuits about the amount of the payment or other details is a slap in the face to the US. If the surviving vets don't like the good-will gesture they are offered, they should feel free to refuse to accept such an insulting offer and go about their business.

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No, we were taught about the Philippine Indepedence Act (Tydings-McDuffie Act) that went into effect in 1935 initiated by one Manuel Quezon. It was the establishment of a transitional government (10-year period) with the intent to totally handover control to the new Philippine Government. In the interim, the US would maintain a military presence and was given authority over the Philippine military forces... which were subsequently called into action to defend the country.

 

This is the Filipino-initated act that stripped Filipinos of American citizenship and it occured almost a decade before Japan invaded.

 

Or so I was told.

 

Who told you that ? Who was your math teacher ?

 

1935 + 10 years transition period = 1945

 

The Philippines Campaign was from 1941

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All the history information is interesting, but I don't see how its relevant to the lawsuit in the OP. I think its pretty clear that the US reneged on its promise to Filipino vets. However, the time to sue about that was in 1946 when it happened, not nearly 65 years later.

 

Heh. Seeing as the OP is about a claim with its sole basis in this history, it is very relevant.

 

I don't see how anything is clear. What was this 'promise' the US allegedly renegged on?

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no different then the french freedom fighters when the part of the war was done in the PHilippines the \freedom fighters went back to \their homes and the rest of the army went on to fight on another island... If the \freedom fighters were US military they should of gone on to fight for the US as the war was not over after the Philippines...

 

 

According to this website on A Short History of the 1st & 2nd Filipino Infantry Regiments of the U. S. Army in World War II

 

There was a Filipino Infantry that did fight in New Guinea, these where Filipinos where where already in the US and Hawaii who volunteered.

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The US realized that they treated Filipino vets poorly and made a goodwill gesture offering lump sum payments to surviving vets.

 

In my opinion, since the payments were a good-will gesture and not legally required, lawsuits about the amount of the payment or other details is a slap in the face to the US. If the surviving vets don't like the good-will gesture they are offered, they should feel free to refuse to accept such an insulting offer and go about their business.

 

 

The lawsuit maintains that all veterans, regardless of citizenship now, get the same amount of lump sum benefits.

 

It is a slap in the face the US citizen Filipino veterans get $15,000 while non-US citizens only get $9,000.

 

Veterans fought the same war, suffered the same atrocities and the continued injustice from the US government.

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According to this website on A Short History of the 1st & 2nd Filipino Infantry Regiments of the U. S. Army in World War II

 

There was a Filipino Infantry that did fight in New Guinea, these where Filipinos where where already in the US and Hawaii who volunteered.

 

Taken from your linked article:

 

The Tydings-McDuffie Act of 1934 treated the Filipinos in the U.S. as aliens. Although the Philippine Commonwealth Constitution permitted the United States to draft Filipinos in the Philippines to defend American interests there, Filipinos in the United States, quite ironically, were exempt from military service.

 

Commonwealth =/= citizenship

 

 

The Filipinos you mention volunteered from within the US. It is hardly the same thing as drafting the entire Philippine Army to defend its country. For some reason, I doubt that any of those that enlisted under the Selective Service Act got the 'shaft' claimed in the OP.

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