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Curing and Boiling a Ham


Ricky

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I like a good old English Ham and am going to venture at making one, but having never done it before this will take a bit of experimenting. I'm wondering if anyone has done it before? Also whether anyone here knows a very good butcher for getting the cut that we want. (We live in Banilad).

 

I've found a couple one recipe;

http://www.channel4....recipe_p_1.html

Edited by Ricky
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spritsail

My wife and I regularly make smoked ham from our own pigs. i have never tried the boiled method, and Fearnley doesn;t say if you have to skin the ham or not.

 

My wife takes all the skin off the ham, we wash it, dry with clean cloth,, then cover it in a mixture of salt and curing salt (salt petre - I have to look at the packet) then place in the bottom of the refrigerator for over a week - this is a dry cure.

 

We then wash off the salt, and place the ham in a net - special from a sausage maker in Cebu. We then hang in the wood burning oven/smoker at a temperature about 140 degs F with a small fire covered in coconut fibre for about 12 hours,or until the meat is tender and pink,. let it cool then place in a refrigerator.

 

You can eat it hot or cold. During the smoking process we baste with honey and olive oil.

 

i have tried the boiling method with the hocks - front legs, and they tend to be too salty for my taste. i prefer to roast them in an electric/gas oven so that the skin is almost crackling, or you can place in a large le Creuset (cast iron) casserole with lid and cook for about 2 hours. Best served with lentils, onions, tomatoes etc that you can add to the casserole later.

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My wife takes all the skin off the ham, we wash it, dry with clean cloth,, then cover it in a mixture of salt and curing salt (salt petre - I have to look at the packet) then place in the bottom of the refrigerator for over a week - this is a dry cure.

 

 

If you were to ask anyone here - at a store or supermarket - for saltpeter you would most probably get big blank looks. It is known here as either salitre or prague powder and comes in small plastic packages; it is pink on color.

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Prague Powder = Regular salt + Sodium Nitrate or Sodium Nitrite

 

Salt Peter (Saltpetre) = Potassium Nitrate

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spritsail

When you make your curing mixture you need to add sugar, about 3 ozs. Always try to use sea salt or rock salt, never use an iodised /powder salt . it will not work. If you go for a wet brine, the brine mixture is ready if an egg can float in the brine solution.

 

Experiment with the hocks first before attempting to cure and produce a ham - york style or jambon parissiene - . if all fails then Slers Hams of Cdo do the best ham in Mindinao and probably the Visayas ,especially their gammon steaks and bacon and not too expensive - better than Pure Foods ham. etc.

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Thanks for the useful and practical ham curing info., spritsail. We might try it out when we go back to Cebu again next spring. :thumbsup:

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broden

i love boiled ham ..

 

just brining is so good though anyway

 

we often brine pork shoulders and country style boneless ribs or beef briskets and just slow roast them close to 200 degrees for 8 or 9 hours (though you can go much less time)

 

brushing on a home made sauce every 45 minutes or so

 

excellent

 

we've tried chicken quarters too not bad and venison a time or two

 

we actually use an entire drawer in our fridge when we brine cleaned well before and after of course.. fill it with meat and brine close the drawer and leave it for a day or two turning the stuff over a few times

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Thank you, a few ideas to try. It will be a bit of experimenting to get it right, but I've got an idea now from your posts.

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Prague Powder = Regular salt + Sodium Nitrate or Sodium Nitrite

 

Salt Peter (Saltpetre) = Potassium Nitrate

 

Thank you, stand to be corrected. Can one use prague powder instead of saltpetre then, and if not, where would you be able to purchase saltpetre locally?

 

Agree with spritsail about the quality of SLERS hams - shame it is not available in the Visayas.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have used that method often. I didn't read all of the posts on this thread but it's best to star out with a small piece of pork . Three kilo works well . Here's a good web site http://schmidling.com/ham.htm It's not difficult but you need to be exact in yur measuremets. Prague powder is available at SM. Don't use iodized salt.

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Hello Ricky

 

Just a quick follow up to your thread "curing and cooking a ham". I slaughtered a pig a couple of weeks ago, and decided that I would have a go at the Hugh Fearnly receipe. However this is copied verbatim from Jane Grigson's excelllent book: Charcuterie and French Pork Cooking. (Penguin Book 1970), so I stuck to her book - my pork cooking bible.

 

I dry cured (sel aromataise') the two knuckles (hindquarters) and the two hocks for a week, but unfortunately had run out of curing salt, and no substitute available on the island. I left them unskinned. I didn't bother with a wet brine as we needed the hams in the restaurant ASAP.

 

I washed all the salt off, then placed them in boiling water for ten minutes, Drained and repeated again with fresh water - the water was still salty after the first boil. I then pinned cloves into the skin and made a court bouillon (carrots, onion , bouquet garni etc), then simmered them for about 2 hours.

 

The meat was still a bit tough , and the presentation of the ham was miserable. The bones had left the meat, and the ham's shape had collapsed, i placed them in an hot electric oven, basting with olive oil to crisp up the skin.

 

Once cooked - a fork easily goes into the meat, I let them stand for 24 hours to let the fat and meat settle.

 

The end result was that the meat was too whitish, none of the nice pink you get with the curing salt. There was no bone, and carving was difficult. The meat texture and taste was OK but nothing like a nice smoked ham.

 

I had a plate of ham, a big dollop of Picalilli and a pitta bread yesterday for afternoon tea, and really enjoyed it.

 

I couldn't sell it as a ham slice in the restaurant, but we cubed it for Shanghai Special fried rice, Singaporean pineapple/ham fried rice, ham and egg pies and breakfast pitta bread pockets.

 

Next time I will definetely smoke them as usual so that they are on the bone.

 

If you want a ham on the bone for Christmas, and maybe a fat freerange, oven ready turkey, just send me a PM early December.

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spritsail, thanks for the reply. I will take you up on the purchase of a ham for Christmas, will drop you a PM.

We currently have a ham in brine at the moment, and will see how this works, but I can understand it not comparing to a smoked ham.

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