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fredanna

About Building Your Dream House

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fredanna

Hello From Fredanna

 

Over a pretty long period of time, I have read postings from those who have built their own dream house. Some mentioned loading a container with Home Depot stuff like electrical and plumbing to get 'quality' into their house.

 

For the electrical, you must remember that electrical switches and circuit breakers and panels are rated to distribute mostly 110 VAC and just a few of the heavy 220 volt loads such as oven,water heater,dryer,central A/C. Power strips from the USA have surge protectors and interference filters and indicator lamps designed for 110 VAC.

So, you're stuck with what they have here for electrical hardware. If a contractor is wiring your dream house, they will have to have that inspected............IF you're following the rules and not slipping someone a tip.

 

Now plumbing here in the RP is mostly junk, unless you luck out to get the contractor to install known big name fixtures. OR bring those with you from the USA. The water system here is mostly medium to low pressure from MCWD........sometimes nothing. You open the faucet and you hear this sucking sound. No wonder the water quality here is questionable.

Enuf from me my P5's worth

 

Fred

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Balay
For the electrical, you must remember that electrical switches and circuit breakers and panels are rated to distribute mostly 110 VAC and just a few of the heavy 220 volt loads such as oven,water heater,dryer,central A/C. Power strips from the USA have surge protectors and interference filters and indicator lamps designed for 110 VAC.

 

:crack-up:

 

 

I am sorry but this has to be one of the funniest threads I have ever read.

 

Have you ever heard of OHMs law ?

 

No wonder electricians can charge the amount they do.

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easy44

It's not THAT funny.

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Ozepete

Best to leave your US 110 VAC equipment behind and purchase 240 VAC appliances in the Philippines. Apart from the differences in infrastructure that exist between various countries,110 VAC systems, circuits and equipment are inferior to their 240 VAC equivalents.

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fredanna
For the electrical, you must remember that electrical switches and circuit breakers and panels are rated to distribute mostly 110 VAC and just a few of the heavy 220 volt loads such as oven,water heater,dryer,central A/C. Power strips from the USA have surge protectors and interference filters and indicator lamps designed for 110 VAC.

 

thats-funny.gif

 

 

I am sorry but this has to be one of the funniest threads I have ever read.

 

Have you ever heard of OHMs law ?

 

No wonder electricians can charge the amount they do.

 

Totally aware of OHMS law for the last 35 yrs.

And for safety the circuit breakers in the panel should be double pole to to turn off both lines to the protected circuit. I have witnessed the two hot leads used here. It's not a guarantee one wire hot and the other 0 volts.

It may explain the half glowing circular flourescents and the flashing CFL's I see in our apartment.........and thank goodness another expat fellow employee, who saw the same thing in his apartment.

Fred

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smokey

Best to leave your US 110 VAC equipment behind and purchase 240 VAC appliances in the Philippines. Apart from the differences in infrastructure that exist between various countries,110 VAC systems, circuits and equipment are inferior to their 240 VAC equivalents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

have you ever bought appliances here..... I have a samsung stainless steel refer with water and ice in the door ,,,, US cost me in peso today under 50,000p when i went to look for appliances here the same model back in 2005 was 122,000 peso ... then add the stove micro, washer , drier , dish washer, disposal etc it adds up fast sure you can get cheaper models here and you get what you pay for..if your building a house that is the best time to wire it 110/220 my plumping is all from the us and still working fine 5 years later .....

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Ozepete

Best to leave your US 110 VAC equipment behind and purchase 240 VAC appliances in the Philippines. Apart from the differences in infrastructure that exist between various countries,110 VAC systems, circuits and equipment are inferior to their 240 VAC equivalents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

have you ever bought appliances here..... I have a samsung stainless steel refer with water and ice in the door ,,,, US cost me in peso today under 50,000p when i went to look for appliances here the same model back in 2005 was 122,000 peso ... then add the stove micro, washer , drier , dish washer, disposal etc it adds up fast sure you can get cheaper models here and you get what you pay for..if your building a house that is the best time to wire it 110/220 my plumping is all from the us and still working fine 5 years later .....

 

 

 

Actually yes. Just bought a house full of gear, fridges, TVs, washing machine, karaoke noise thingy,gas / electric stove, 3 x air cons etc., and the cost was better than shippingsame out from Oz. The prices from Alex Go at Cebu Appliance were comparable toOz outlets on average. The point I was trying to make is that the 240VAC systemis far better so why bother complicating things .. sort of

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Headshot

"For the electrical, you must remember that electrical switches and circuit breakers and panels are rated to distribute mostly 110 VAC and just a few of the heavy 220 volt loads such as oven,water heater,dryer,central A/C. Power strips from the USA have surge protectors and interference filters and indicator lamps designed for 110 VAC."

 

I wouldn't bother bringing any electrical appliances from the US to the Philippines, but if you are talking about wire, outlets and switches, then that is a different story. I don't know if you have ever looked at the ratings, but 120 volt outlets and switches are rated for 240 volts (read the backs of the fixtures). Enclosed wiring (what most people refer to as Romex) is rated (insulated) for 600 volts. It is written right on the wire jacket. In the US, we generally use these products for 120-volt applications, but they will work just fine for 220 volts found here in the Philippines. The nice thing about having black, white and bare wires is that you can provide a ground for your electronics (surge protectors don't really do much good unless they are tied to ground). If you compare the materials from the US with the materials you find in the local hardware stores, there is absolutely no comparison on quality. The typical stuff you can buy here is crap.

 

A lot of electronics (computers, TV's, DVR's, radios, etc.) come with grounding plugs, but you either have to use an adapter, a power strip, or break off the ground probe to be able to use them with the two blade (no ground) outlets common here. By doing any of these things, you have defeated the purpose of having the grounding plug in the first place. Of course, that is obvious since electronics get fried here all the time when lightning hits the lines and sends surges into customers' homes. Without grounds, there is no protection. Most people here use power strips for plugging into simply because seldom are there enough outlets in a room to service the electrical needs. So, if you are designing, make sure you figure more outlets in too. If people here think they are protecting anything by using power cords and surge strips on an ungrounded system, then they are fooling themselves.

Edited by Headshot
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smokey

Best to leave your US 110 VAC equipment behind and purchase 240 VAC appliances in the Philippines. Apart from the differences in infrastructure that exist between various countries,110 VAC systems, circuits and equipment are inferior to their 240 VAC equivalents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

have you ever bought appliances here..... I have a samsung stainless steel refer with water and ice in the door ,,,, US cost me in peso today under 50,000p when i went to look for appliances here the same model back in 2005 was 122,000 peso ... then add the stove micro, washer , drier , dish washer, disposal etc it adds up fast sure you can get cheaper models here and you get what you pay for..if your building a house that is the best time to wire it 110/220 my plumping is all from the us and still working fine 5 years later .....

 

 

 

Actually yes. Just bought a house full of gear, fridges, TVs, washing machine, karaoke noise thingy,gas / electric stove, 3 x air cons etc., and the cost was better than shippingsame out from Oz. The prices from Alex Go at Cebu Appliance were comparable toOz outlets on average. The point I was trying to make is that the 240VAC systemis far better so why bother complicating things .. sort of 'when in Rome do asthe Romans do'

 

 

 

 

 

 

well i really am not interested in any brand except samsung and the prices here are x3 then the US and wiring my house for 110/220 was not that much more and to tell you the truth their system sucks.. we have phase 3 and it still sucks..but that is all part of the price you pay when you want to live like a king on a working stiffs pension , the whole point is not what is here but what is worth the money... on one side of the street you have a BMW cost a little more but pretty good quality on the other side of the street you have a yugo ... well need i say more

Edited by robert51

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sperry

I know this is a really stupid question but aren't there national regulations on what sort of electrics you can install in a house?

 

And if there what will happen if someone electrocutes themselves on your non-standard installation? or your house burns down?

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Headshot

I know this is a really stupid question but aren't there national regulations on what sort of electrics you can install in a house?

 

And if there what will happen if someone electrocutes themselves on your non-standard installation? or your house burns down?

You're kidding, right? Getting a building permit here is a matter of paying the money and you have the permit. It is extremely unlikely that anyone will ever inspect anything. Almost ALL construction materials sold here (especially electrical and plumbing) are substandard. The reason you see toilets cemented to the floor instead of tied to a pipe fitting is that the substandard pipes used here aren't up to holding the fitting. Whole sections of the city burn down here all the time. It is usually attributed to open fires used for cooking in people's homes, but often faulty electrical materials or workmanship are to blame.

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smokey

I know this is a really stupid question but aren't there national regulations on what sort of electrics you can install in a house?

 

And if there what will happen if someone electrocutes themselves on your non-standard installation? or your house burns down?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

well it that happens and you get killed its an accident and your family will get 60,000p to help send you to the big house in the sky

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Jess Bartone

Best to leave your US 110 VAC equipment behind and purchase 240 VAC appliances in the Philippines. Apart from the differences in infrastructure that exist between various countries,110 VAC systems, circuits and equipment are inferior to their 240 VAC equivalents.

 

You must be thinking of Oz, which used to be 240vac 50 Hz, but is now actually 230vac. The Philippines is 220vac 60 Hz. Fortunately most electronic equipment these days senses the volts/cycles automatically and adjusts itself. I'm sure our American friends will disagree that their 110 volt system is "inferior". Plenty of foreigners have wired their (Philippines) homes with 110 and 220 alongside each other.

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m60man

Well Fred.........your mistaking or have been misled. I brought all my (Levitron) switches, outlets and 12/3 romex from the states to use here in my house. They work just fine with 220. Their quality is superior compared to those available here. These systems can be grounded. As for plumbing, I did all my own plumbing. I brought closet flanges, wax rings and vent boots with me for the same reason....superior quality. Bolted my toilets to the floor rather than cemented, have had no problems. I installed a 1/2 horse power pump and pressure tank, therefore I regulate my water pressure. Limit switch set to 42psi high side and 22psi on the low side. I built this house to American standards, wood, 2x4 walls on 16" centers, heavier lumber for floors and rafters, all marine plywood sheathing to include 3/4 inch sub floors covered by 1/2 on top of that. This gives me a solid floor that will support the tile. More then half is carpeted which cost a bit more but, carpet and pad is excellent sound proofing for the upstairs. All walls and ceilings are Sheetrock. Windows are all vinyl with sliding windows and built in screens. Roof is asphalt shingles with felt underlayment. Will be applying vinyl siding next week. So if you plan on building your dream home here I suggest talking to someone here that has had the hands on experience. It will save you lots of peso's and more importantly time!

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fredanna

Well Fred.........your mistaking or have been misled. I brought all my (Levitron) switches, outlets and 12/3 romex from the states to use here in my house. They work just fine with 220. Their quality is superior compared to those available here. These systems can be grounded. As for plumbing, I did all my own plumbing. I brought closet flanges, wax rings and vent boots with me for the same reason....superior quality. Bolted my toilets to the floor rather than cemented, have had no problems. I installed a 1/2 horse power pump and pressure tank, therefore I regulate my water pressure. Limit switch set to 42psi high side and 22psi on the low side. I built this house to American standards, wood, 2x4 walls on 16" centers, heavier lumber for floors and rafters, all marine plywood sheathing to include 3/4 inch sub floors covered by 1/2 on top of that. This gives me a solid floor that will support the tile. More then half is carpeted which cost a bit more but, carpet and pad is excellent sound proofing for the upstairs. All walls and ceilings are Sheetrock. Windows are all vinyl with sliding windows and built in screens. Roof is asphalt shingles with felt underlayment. Will be applying vinyl siding next week. So if you plan on building your dream home here I suggest talking to someone here that has had the hands on experience. It will save you lots of peso's and more importantly time!

 

 

YUP probably mislead m60man. 60 minute man? Anyway very good advice and your plan sounds pretty good and do-able. I guess trying to get a Filipino plumber contractor to build to USA standards would be next to impossible. I'm just beginning to understand the frustration of talking and describing what I'm looking for. I think it's "well we do that differently here............or I know USA standards but I'm too lazy to build to your specs.....I'd rather do it the Filipino way"

I wish I had your skills, my friend. I know how to repair and replace but not design and build.

 

Fred

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