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JamesMusslewhite

PT Boat - "Devil Boats" - style hulls

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miles-high

The building with a nice swimming pool is the Subic Bay Yacht Club... To the left by the Causeway Rd, you will see 2 seemingly abandoned PT boats. I don't know anything about boats, someone told those are PT boats... I still see them there when I go to an Italian restaurant nearby... Just wondering – must have some interesting history to those boats… :)

 

attachicon.gifpt.png

 

OK I was there again to the Italian resto today and on the way back I took the pics of those two boats shown on the Goodle Earth...

 

Now, could someone definitely tell me if those are PT boats? :)

 

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DPP_0007.JPGDPP_0013.JPG

DPP_0015.JPGDPP_0014.JPG

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cheesemiz

i dont know but i want one of those.

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miles-high

I will have to make a run up to Cubic when next in Manila. I would love to see them and take various photos, and perhaps tour one or both if possible..

 

I took some pics for you yesterday... if these are in fact PT, perhaps some of us should buy one and refurb it (probably less expensive in the Philippines)... ;) Although I would think it might be a gas gazzler... :D

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JamesMusslewhite

I took some pics for you yesterday... if these are in fact PT, perhaps some of us should buy one and refurb it (probably less expensive in the Philippines)... ;) Although I would think it might be a gas gazzler... :D

They are not US PT-boats but they certainly look like they were designed as military high-speed riverboats and shore patrol crafts.  These appear to also be longer than the standard PT's which were primarely 78-84 foot in lenght depending on model. These boats look like they are perhaps 95 foot or more in lenght. They certainly would make for an interesting restoration project. Thanks for the photos. I will try to look through the internet and see if I can find any photos of simular crafts so perhaps their make and model can be properly identified.  

Edited by JamesMusslewhite

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spooks

Prow design is pretty standard for South China sea and indian ocean swells as the knife to cut high waves.

 

 

I can just see the ice boxes on deck and the cleaning and clearing station ahead of the deck house

 

makes for a good fishing boat.

 

wonder if it be good as a dive boat

 

 

wonder if they are for sale?

Edited by spooks
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Grey_O_Wolf

Hi James,

 

I have been reading a lot of your posts and I am fascinated by the same things you  seem to be interested in doing! A few years ago I too, thought of building a boat so started doing some research. I bought a few books on methodology of wood, plywood and fiberglass construction techniques. The PT boat build you would like to do sounds great! I hope you get started soon. In teh meanwhile, I humbly submit this link....    http://www.glen-l.com/ It is a company in the USA that supplies plans for an incredible number of boats. It also has the necessary supplies to build them. I believe there are several engineers on staff who can also advise on modifying existing designs. If you have not checked them out to-date, they may be able to help you. PS: I would love to help you build those puppies also!

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dave

I checked into building a large PT boat a couple of yrs back but the builder I had talked with it would not be as economical as boats built now.  I am still considering having a boat built if I can find an economical way of having my boat constructed but not sure if to go with steel or fiberglass over plywood.  Boats I am currently considering are 55' Tanuki by Spira Boats or the Lively 34 by Clarkcraft.  I have even considered mating the two Lively 34 "outriggers" to the Tanuki for bluewater stability.  There is a larger design built from steel by MK Boats from Britain but the reason I have not bought the plans is because it requires lofting.  A main factor in choosing the design would be the ability to travel a minimum of 1500 nautical miles nonstop.

I am interested in receiving feedback from others here.  If there are any REASONABLE, very good quality builders in the Cebu or Samar area I am interested to know, thanks.

Edited by dave
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Oz Jon

...... I believe that our exposed hillside on the road through the farm may have the right consistency of clay to perhaps make a good quality construction brick, so I will be making fired test bricks and ........

 

James,

 

If you've got the right kind of soil on your land, then in combination with the cheap labour available in the Phils, you may like to consider building your new home from "mud brick" or "compressed/rammed earth"?

Cheaper, simpler and quicker than making fired bricks.

 

Apart from the very low cost, the thick walls make very good insulation and are sound deadening.

 

It doesn't sound very glamorous, but there are quite a few (reasonably up-market) houses built that way in Oz and heaps of enthusiastic devotees.

 

They are far more durable than you would imagine.

I've seen remains of walls of old buildings, which in spite of being exposed to the weather for more than 100 years, are weathered, but still reasonably intact .

 

There is plenty of info on the net about this kind of construction - just Google for it.

 

Cheers

Edited by Oz Jon
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colemanlee

One of the builders of the PT boats is still in business...Huckins...I believe the hull design was a modified fair form flyer...

 

http://www.huckinsyacht.com/

 

You might be interested in having a look....

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Oz Jon

OK I was there again to the Italian resto today and on the way back I took the pics of those two [ PT? ] boats shown on the Goodle Earth...

 

Buying and restoring one of those boats would be an interesting and satisfying project ..... but .....I think you would need deep pockets! ...... and lots of spare time!

 

I can't imagine a budget of less than US$100K ..... US$200K wouldn't surprise me

 

They are seriously big boats! and boat costs go up by the cube of the length.  (double the size= 8x the cost)

 

And operating costs?????

Edited by Oz Jon
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JamesMusslewhite

Buying and restoring one of those boats would be an interesting and satisfying project ..... but .....I think you would need deep pockets! ...... and lots of spare time!

 

I can't imagine a budget of less than US$100K ..... US$200K wouldn't surprise me

 

They are seriously big boats! and boat costs go up by the cube of the length.  (double the size= 8x the cost)

 

And operating costs?????

 

If and when I can start on this project it would take the same commitment as one would take to properly build a 2-story 4 bedroom home. One advantage would be to use constriction truss technology and laminating wood and plywood. Example when PT boats were originally built overlaid planks were used to make the hull and they were designed extra heavy to endure combat requirements. They were also 78-84 foot long boats designed for massive motors and 14 man crews..

 

What I want to build is a lighter framed 65 foot boat designed on the same tradition PT hull designed but as a pleasure craft. A boat that my wife and I could comfortably live on as we toured around these islands. The glues and laminates combined with modern truss technology, available hardwoods and marine plywoods would allow such a boat to be built much lighter and more affordable. With labor cost for quality boat builders here in the Philippine makes me believe the basic boat could cost under $65,000 now depending on the engines one would choose and the extent of the quality and detail work of the interior of the various living and working space would certainly drive that price much higher.

 

I would never do this, but I always felt it could be a good business for a few craftsmen with a budget, as boats could be built with different packages and accessories. and sold by special order. The advantage of a seagoing craft with a draft shallow draft that can go upriver and could slice through the waters at speeds in excess of 70 mph, combined and the novelty factor of the mystique due to the history of the 'devil boat' design would give them a marketable appeal. Multiple designs and lengths all ranging from working boats to pleasure craft packages means a very versatile product and a wide rage of potential clientele. The hull designed has long been accepted as sound, so getting these boats certified and properly certified should be very easy and marketable to the surrounding countries and even in Australia.

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
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Oz Jon

What I want to build is a lighter framed 65 foot boat designed on the same tradition PT hull designed but as a pleasure craft. A boat that my wife and I could comfortably live on as we toured around these islands.

 

You may want to also look into catamarans (maybe a power cat, rather than a sailing cat?) to achieve that aim James.

 

My 43' cat is a performance cruising cat built with epoxy-foam sandwich - quite expensive with a high efficiency sailing rig - but is set-up with a big cabin, a 4-burner stove, plenty of galley space, full headroom, 4 full size double berths, 2 toilets, 2 showers. It draws .5m and is beachable.

4-6 adults can live aboard very comfortably.

Very low drag - It does about 15kts with a 40HP diesel, about 5kts with a 10HP outboard and over 20kts under sail. I've sailed over 6000mls in it, weathered a few storms at sea and lived on-board in Carmen (with a few breaks) for 2-3 years.

 

You could build a much cheaper cat design to meet your requirements, using lots of labour and much cheaper materials.

Something like a Wharram (sailing version or power only)?  There are hundreds of them (amateur built) all over the world and a lot of Wharram devotees (almost a cult!).

 

Cats are very stable (particularly power cats) and can carry big loads.

 

Plenty of info about building them and cruising in them on the web. <http://wharram.com/site/>

 

Cheers!

 

ps.I reckon that 2 adults and 2 kids could live quite well on a 30-35' Wharram. It could probably carry over a ton as an inter island freighter.

 

pps. with a small sail fitted, it can probably do about 50miles on a bottle of San Mig!- Lol!

Edited by Oz Jon
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Oz Jon

Here is a bit more info on "rammed earth" construction, extracted from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rammed_earth>

 

'Soil is a widely available, low-cost and sustainable resource, and utilizing it in construction has minimal environmental impact.[7] This makes rammed-earth construction highly affordable and viable for low-income builders. Unskilled labour can do most of the necessary work, and today more than 30 percent of the world's population uses earth as a building material.[4] Rammed earth has been used around the world in a wide range of climatic conditions, from wet northern Europe to dry regions in Africa.

 

While the cost of material is low, rammed-earth construction without mechanical tools can be very time-consuming; however, with a mechanical tamper and prefabricated formwork, it can take as little as two to three days to construct the walls for a 200 to 220 m2 (2,200 to 2,400 sq ft) house.'

 

That's a pretty impressive building rate (19m = 60ft/day)- with very cheap material and unskilled labour too!

 

see also <http://www.ebaa.asn.au/>

Edited by Oz Jon
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Oz Jon

Only marginally "on-topic" in response to something you wrote James, so I won't pursue this further on this thread.

 

I don't have any 1st hand experience with it - maybe other LinC members do? (in a new thread?)

Edited by Oz Jon

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miles-high

My 43' cat is a performance cruising cat built with epoxy-foam sandwich - quite expensive with a high efficiency sailing rig - but is set-up with a big cabin, a 4-burner stove, plenty of galley space, full headroom, 4 full size double berths, 2 toilets, 2 showers. It draws .5m and is beachable. 4-6 adults can live aboard very comfortably. Very low drag - It does about 15kts with a 40HP diesel, about 5kts with a 10HP outboard and over 20kts under sail. I've sailed over 6000mls in it, weathered a few storms at sea and lived on-board in Carmen (with a few breaks) for 2-3 years.

Very impressive… but must be very expensive! :) Gunther’s been telling me that I should buy a cat, guess he is sailing a cat from CA to Australia I think… Anyway, I am going to Puerto Rico early next month to look at a 40ft motorsailor. I don’t know if I buy it but it would be a challenge to bring it to Subic Bay (as my waterfront vacation house)… It got a big enough fuel tank to motor it from the west coast to Hawaii but I am not sure as I have no blue water experience (sailed only on Lake Michigan)...

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