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JamesMusslewhite

PT Boat - "Devil Boats" - style hulls

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Alan S

My only slight reservervation is the use of mahogany.

 

Will there be enough and of the right quality?

And, even if there is, is it a good use for a scarce resouce?

Also, would it make them too expensive?

 

 

There are, as you know, alternatives, and they may be worth considering.

 

GRP would be my first choice (although you would be best to make prototypes of wood).

Marine ply has some advantages, and even if you wish to keep to the double (or triple) diagonal construction, that can be cut into strips and used.

 

The traditional "best material" for hulls is pitch pine (preferably on a grown oak frame), but finding thet now, especially in the philippines, would be difficult-to-impossible.

 

 

As an aside, you may already know that Higgins bough the entire output of Philippine mahogany, and that enabled him to make landing craft when they were wanted in WW2.

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JamesMusslewhite

My only slight reservervation is the use of mahogany.

 

Will there be enough and of the right quality?

And, even if there is, is it a good use for a scarce resouce?

Also, would it make them too expensive?

 

 

There are, as you know, alternatives, and they may be worth considering.

 

GRP would be my first choice (although you would be best to make prototypes of wood).

Marine ply has some advantages, and even if you wish to keep to the double (or triple) diagonal construction, that can be cut into strips and used.

 

The traditional "best material" for hulls is pitch pine (preferably on a grown oak frame), but finding thet now, especially in the philippines, would be difficult-to-impossible.

 

 

As an aside, you may already know that Higgins bough the entire output of Philippine mahogany, and that enabled him to make landing craft when they were wanted in WW2.

 

You bring up an interesting point, that I have been confronted with already. With all the illegal timber cutting operation depleting the forest, and the total lack of reforestation programs. As a horticulturist I personally do not want to be a contributor to these illegal operations. I do not wish to be an exploiter of this countries natural resources. Having several mahogany trees on our farm land, we have had to stop cutters from trying to completely cut them down or thin out their branches. I once had an Australian man try to offer me 300 pesos total for a 45 year tree like he was somehow doing me a favor, I told him that the wood was worth more than that per board foot; and to get his dumb ass off my land. Damn idiot trying to treat me like I'm a fool, just a cheap ass opportunist trying to get a lot for nothing.

 

I will probable only use Mahogany as ribs and the hull's outer skin on my own personal boat. I want it to be unique and one-of-a-kind. I will have the inner cabins done completely in different fine Philippine hand carved woods. I know I will never sell it and someday it will be treasured by my son. I am sure that for me, it will be a continuous work in progress and labor of love for years to come.

 

Now high quality woods can be used for the inner ribs but with composites and tress technology used today, much lighter and less expensive can easily be used. This will allow the desired strength and still be cost effective to build in production. The Philippines has several excellent wood that or properly forested and harvested by companies that use proper reforestation practices. One reason I want to build these types of boats is so the locals authorities can use them to help patrol the small islands for illegal logging, cyanide fishers and dynamite fishers. These types of boats would be ideal for light patrol and rescue operations.

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Headshot

I will probable only use Mahogany as ribs and the hull's outer skin on my own personal boat. I want it to be unique and one-of-a-kind. I will have the inner cabins done completely in different fine Philippine hand carved woods. I know I will never sell it and someday it will be treasured by my son. I am sure that for me, it will be a continuous work in progress and labor of love for years to come.

 

Now high quality woods can be used for the inner ribs but with composites and tress technology used today, much lighter and less expensive can easily be used. This will allow the desired strength and still be cost effective to build in production. The Philippines has several excellent wood that or properly forested and harvested by companies that use proper reforestation practices. One reason I want to build these types of boats is so the locals authorities can use them to help patrol the small islands for illegal logging, cyanide fishers and dynamite fishers. These types of boats would be ideal for light patrol and rescue operations.

To purchase PT boat plans, photographs, and more go to http://www.ptboats.org . I had no idea that the original PT boats were built out of Mexican mahogany until I read it in http://www.pt103.com/. I knew they were built out of wood, but I had always assumed it was plywood like the later PBRs of the Vietnam War era. Good luck with this project, James.

Edited by Headshot
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boco

That's an interesting project. I built boats when I lived in San Diego. All of them were custom yachts. We used the airex foam method of building a plug and glassing outside, flipping it over and glassing the insides. I've seen some real strong marine ply and epoxy boats too.

 

You might want to check out these guys. I buy most of my epoxy for my business from them. Great guys and very knowledgeable.

 

Bateau Boats

 

Here is a shameless plug for my site.

 

woody logic surfboards

 

D.

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Runian

dam I want to build one too ..

however I don't think my 90 k/ month would support the build ;)

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spritsail

Anyone that has URLs to good boat building websites or any solid advice, please post them on this thread. I am presently trying to gather all the best information on all proper techniques used in the different processes involved, from initial designing, construction, propulsion, wiring and rigging, to applying the glues and finishing. Any assistance from members would be greatly appreciated; because they will allow me to avoid complications, missed steps, mistakes, added expenses, and to do the best job possible. Thanks

 

 

James, have you checked out this wooden boat builders forum? http://forum.woodenb...Building-Repair

 

You can always try www.pinoyboats.org , this is a non profit site for boat buildfing enthusiasts in the Philippiines. You will always find someone who can make a positive suggestion or advice.

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JamesMusslewhite

Anyone that has URLs to good boat building websites or any solid advice, please post them on this thread. I am presently trying to gather all the best information on all proper techniques used in the different processes involved, from initial designing, construction, propulsion, wiring and rigging, to applying the glues and finishing. Any assistance from members would be greatly appreciated; because they will allow me to avoid complications, missed steps, mistakes, added expenses, and to do the best job possible. Thanks

 

 

James, have you checked out this wooden boat builders forum? http://forum.woodenb...Building-Repair

 

This was a great suggestion and I bookmarked the URL. It looks like a great place to get valuable information...Thanks.

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JamesMusslewhite

That's an interesting project. I built boats when I lived in San Diego. All of them were custom yachts. We used the airex foam method of building a plug and glassing outside, flipping it over and glassing the insides. I've seen some real strong marine ply and epoxy boats too.

 

You might want to check out these guys. I buy most of my epoxy for my business from them. Great guys and very knowledgeable.

 

Bateau Boats

 

Here is a shameless plug for my site.

 

woody logic surfboards

 

D.

 

Thanks for the URL it seems to have a very active forum of boat building enthusiast. I am sure I will be able to use it as a source of information and advice. I bookmarked it and I looked at your site too. It only be shameless if you had not plugged your site. :shitstormretarded:

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JamesMusslewhite

this is still on my "bucket list' of things I want to do while here in the Philippines. After I get the farm up and running and have a place secured were I can both build and launch a 65 foot boat. 

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miles-high

The building with a nice swimming pool is the Subic Bay Yacht Club... To the left by the Causeway Rd, you will see 2 seemingly abandoned PT boats. I don't know anything about boats, someone told those are PT boats... I still see them there when I go to an Italian restaurant nearby... Just wondering – must have some interesting history to those boats… :)

 

pt.png

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Jack_be_nimble

What about weapons? My first thought.  I personally wouldn't be out on the open seas in my own craft without some assault weapons. How about deck mounted cannons and machine gun turrets ? :)

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JamesMusslewhite

I will have to make a run up to Cubic when next in Manila. I would love to see them and take various photos, and perhaps tour one or both if possible..Thank you for the Google Earth link. The Higgins class were 78 foot to 82 foot bow to stern, but I want to build a 3/4 size scale-down model at 60 foot to 65 foot. It is ideal for the waters here due to the shallow draft of the V-hull and the design is proven to be incredibly sea worthy even in foul weather conditions. I could lighten the frame without loosing structural strength and use quality marine plywood instead of hardwood slats for the hull's outer skin. The lighter the boat means the lighter the motors, and the lighter the boat and motors means the better the fuel consumption to operate the boat. I see it as the ideal way to travel the islands here. It can be designed to be very comfortable compartment not unlike a hotel room you simply take with you.  Would only need a crew of three (including captain) and two medium size diesel truck motors should push it quite well through the water when needed. The shallow draft of the hull also makes it an ideal river boat so it can be taken up river when needing a fresh water hull wash, making it easy maintenance. 

 

This is a project that is still several years away before I could be ready to try to construct the boat. I am still seeking copies of all the necessary hull designs of the Higgins hull. The boat will be primarily for personal pleasure but I will design it with a sizable cargo hold so I can also transport construction materials and product when needed. I have a couple of years ahead of me in research, designs and draft out the final blueprints..It is like designing a 65 foot motor home that you can ski behind at 40 miles an hour. This is a very good video of a walk through of the fully combat configured US PT boat, and can give you a feel of the size of total compartment space one would have to work with when designing the personal, storage, work, crew and Galley spaces. This boat is most likely 78-82 foot in length.

 

I have the 32' foot calamari I purchased a couple of years back that I am working on now. I have stripped it down to the solid running board and it is sitting at the beachlot on Dinagat Island, I will have the hull moved to the farm where I will build a bamboo Nepa covering in the next couple of months. The hull board is a 32 footer which I plan on extending both forward and aft to measure 38 foot with a widen hull so I can transfer building materials and product to and from the city and the farm. I will finish it later next year. We will be moving over to the farm full-time so I can finally work on the boat while I am building a small bamboo/nepa home during the next coming months as well as an aquaponic, chicken hutch/run, and rabbit hutches. Later sometime in the next 6 moths I should have crops in the ground where I can buy that a male goat from the Bossman which he offered several weeks back. ) So my plate will be full for the next 3-5 years but when all is constructed and in operation I will start accumulating the needed tools and start purchasing all the required hardware and motors. Then I will spend the next couple of years gleefully screaming, bitching and cursing as I build my little 65' boat toy. At the young age of 55 I have plenty of time to properly draft out the designs and locate the items needed and build such a craft. There are plenty of experienced local shipbuilders in this region that can be hired who are more than capable of building the hull and decking, and traditional carpenters to finish out the compartments and living spaces. One could very comfortably live out of such a craft for months at a time while having easily access to most the best scenic beaches and locations in and around the islands.               

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
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thebob

PT boats were powered by 3 V12 850Hp gasoline engines. If you scale it down to 65ft you are still going to need about 650hp just to get it up on the plane. Full of cargo a shallow bottom boat like that is going to be a bit of a handful in weather, if it doesn't have enough power.

 

Nice project, but try and run it past a marine engineer first. Something a bit more modern would perform much better.

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JamesMusslewhite

PT boats were powered by 3 V12 850Hp gasoline engines. If you scale it down to 65ft you are still going to need about 650hp just to get it up on the plane. Full of cargo a shallow bottom boat like that is going to be a bit of a handful in weather, if it doesn't have enough power.

 

Nice project, but try and run it past a marine engineer first. Something a bit more modern would perform much better.

I plan on running the hull designs through a marine engineer to insure that it will be able to have it registered when built. I will probably never sell the beast but simply run it for pleasure and business and then pass it to on to my son.

 

The 32 foot boat project I will start working on sometime in March or April will convert and modify a 32 foot calamari boat hull to a 38-40 foot wide-hull design. I am interested in looking at jet units because they have a much shallower profile than these traditional back-end low-siting propeller units used here. The lower profile and no propeller would be a great advantage when encountering low-tides and shallow-water inlets. I have been presently looking at 24 hp diesel motor units with propeller. This is fine for a working pace as the distance from Surigao City, del Norte and Cabunga-an, Dinagat is 45 minutes which most is protected waterway but breaks out onto the currents of the Surigao Straights which can be prone to both high waves, swirls, and crosscurrents during the seasons. Diesel engines tend to run cooler when under loads and it is safer hauling containers of diesel than is petro. The boat is primarily intended for hauling building materials and product to and from Dinagat Island, Surigao City, and Siargao Island but I also use it to do a little deep-trench Pacific game fishing when the Marlin and tuna are running. Two or three good strikes and the freezers, smokers, and dryers are stocked to the brim. 

 

What I need is to properly size units that can handle the needs required to sufficiently push a 38-40 foot thick-hulled boat with side-wings carrying 800-3000 lbs of crew, cargo, and supplies at a minimum speed of 4-8 knots?

 

I am working on the drawings now even as we speak so perhaps I will post them here after I have scanned and updated them to Facebook. This will be more of a utility working boat but I also will use the boat for island hopping, site seeing, overnight camping, and a little deep-trench game fishing with friends when the Marlin and tuna are running. I hope I have it sea going by the best of the fishing season. But not too early as the fish are still feasting storm victims who were washing out to sea as they are washing up on the islands around here. The locals have seriously cut down on purchasing fish and are instead buying up all the chicken and pork seriously driving up their prices. Last week the price of anchovies dropped from 140p to 60-30p overnight because bodies were recovered bloated full with anchovies which spilled out of the corpses when they tried to remove them from the water. So fish is off the diet for a few more months unless fresh water or I have raised it myself, no wild catch shrimp for a while which is a shame as shrimp are my favorite vegetable.   :biggrin_01:

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