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Global Murder Rates By Country


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Let me start by saying I've lived and worked in war zones, so I wouldn't be put off by these stats in deciding to live here, there or anywhere. Other factors are more important to me. But the discussion came up about murder rates in another thread, so here's some relative data on rates by country.

 

In this UN data, the RP doesn't fare very well, unfortunately. Efficiency, so accuracy, of crime reported statistics for individual countries no doubt varies, with developed world crime stats likely more accurate than developing nation stats. That said, it's hard to believe that under perfect crime reporting, fewer homicides would be reported in a country than under poor reporting conditions, so any correction for accuracy in the data below would only mean that rates for a given country are likely worse than reported. Therefore, the murder rate in the RP is probably worse than reported here.

 

Global homicide rates

 

The Guardian published a table of global homicide rates by country provided by the UN. The year covered is 2004 (in some cases the figures are averages of two or three years around 2004). The Guardian's list is in alphabetical order and below is converted into a table and sorted by homicide rates in descending order to make the list easier to follow. Of the 28 countries with a homicide rate of over 20 per 100,000, 23 are black. Of the five exceptions, three are Latin American: Colombia, El Salvador, and Venezuela, the other two being Russia and the Philippines.

 

Of the 44 countries with homicide rates between 10 and 20 per 100,000, 29 are black or largely black. Of the remaining 15, listed below, seven are Latin American, and the other eight stretch across Asia.

 

Somewhat surprizing is North Korea, with 18.9. It's a totalitarian country, the most controlled country on earth. South Korea by contrast has a rate of 2.2 Here's a puzzle. Scotland, listed separately from England and Wales, has a rate of 2.6, while England and Wales have a rate of 1.6. How is that possible?

 

Here's another surprise, among the countries with the lowest rate, under 2 per 100,000 several are North African countries: Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria. Could it be that murder happens more frequently in these countries than is reported?

 

Again, these are 2004 data, so already I can see that in the case of Colombia, rates are now likely a little lower; in the case of Venezuela, rates are likely higher now. Make corrections based on what you know about changes that have occurred in particular countries since '04.

 

Homicides per 100,000 pop

 

Colombia 61.1

El Salvador 56.4

Cote d'Ivoire 45.7

South Africa 39.5

Lesotho 37.3

Angola 36

Burundi 35.4

Congo, the Dem Rep of the 35.2

Sierra Leone 34

Jamaica 33.7

Venezuela 32.5

Brazil 30.8

Belize 30.1

Russian Federation 29.7

Central African Rep 29.1

Sudan 28.6

Rwanda 26.6

Guatemala 26.3

Tanzania 26.1

Equatorial Guinea 24

Zambia 22.9

Saint Kitts and Nevis 22.7

Bahamas 22.5

Botswana 21.5

Saint Lucia 21.3

Philippines 21

Mozambique 20.2

Niger 20.2

Ethiopia 19.3

Guyana 19.2

Chad 19

Korea, north 18.9

Puerto Rico 18.9

Congo 18.8

Cambodia 18.5

Burkina Faso 18.1

Malawi 18

Mali 18

Paraguay 17.8

Nigeria 17.7

Nicaragua 17.4

Guinea 17.3

Gabon 17.1

Dominican Rep 16.8

Ecuador 16.8

Liberia 16.8

Guinea-Bissau 16.3

Cameroon 16.1

Saint Vincent--Grenadines 16

Eritrea 15.9

Burma 15.7

Mauritania 15.2

Papua New Guinea 15.2

Barbados 15.1

Senegal 14.2

Honduras 13.8

Togo 13.7

Trinidad and Tobago 13.7

Gambia 13.5

Panama 13.4

Mongolia 13.1

Namibia 12.8

Benin 12.7

Swaziland 12.7

Kazakhstan 11.9

Suriname 11.8

East Timor 11.7

Madagascar 11.7

Ghana 11.6

Mexico 10.9

Cape Verde 10.7

Dominica 10.3

Nauru 9.9

Comoros 9.3

Lithuania 9.1

Indonesia 8.9

Latvia 8.6

Zimbabwe 8.4

Anguilla 8.3

Belarus 8.3

Thailand 8.2

Kyrgyzstan 8.1

Ukraine 8

Turkmenistan 7.8

Antigua and Barbuda 7.7

Costa Rica 7.3

Uganda 7.3

Moldova 7.2

Sri Lanka 7.2

Turkey 6.9

Estonia 6.7

Iraq 6.7

Kenya 6.7

Albania 6.6

Kiribati 6.5

Georgia 6.2

Cuba 6

USA 5.9

Chile 5.5

India 5.5

Lao People's Dem. Rep 5.4

Sao Tome and Principe 5.4

Argentina 5.3

Bolivia 5.3

Haiti 5.3

Grenada 4.9

Uruguay 4.7

Bhutan 4.3

Palestinian Terr 4

Viet Nam 3.8

Montenegro 3.6

Pakistan 3.6

Djibouti 3.5

Seychelles 3.5

Uzbekistan 3.5

Afghanistan 3.4

Somalia 3.3

Saudi Arabia 3.2

Bulgaria 3.1

Monaco 3.1

Peru 3

Iran 2.9

Libya 2.9

Liechtenstein 2.9

Switzerland 2.9

Finland 2.8

Israel 2.6

Scotland 2.6

Armenia 2.5

Mauritius 2.5

Yemen 2.5

Azerbaijan 2.4

Lebanon 2.4

Macedonia 2.4

Northern Ireland 2.4

Romania 2.4

Tajikistan 2.4

Bangladesh 2.3

Slovakia 2.3

China 2.2

Czech Rep 2.2

Korea, south 2.2

Belgium 2.1

Hungary 2.1

Maldives 2.1

Nepal 2.1

Oman 2.1

Croatia 2

Malaysia 2

Bosnia and Herzegovina 1.8

Cyprus 1.8

Marshall Islands 1.8

Malta 1.7

Poland 1.7

Tunisia 1.7

England & Wales 1.6

France 1.6

Canada 1.5

New Zealand 1.5

Slovenia 1.5

Solomon Islands 1.5

Algeria 1.4

Andorra 1.4

Brunei Darussalam 1.4

Kuwait 1.4

Netherlands 1.4

Portugal 1.4

Serbia 1.4

Australia 1.3

Italy 1.2

Jordan 1.2

Spain 1.2

Sweden 1.2

Syria 1.2

Bermuda 1.1

Denmark 1.1

Ireland 1.1

Samoa 1.1

Bahrain 1

Germany 1

Greece 1

Iceland 1

Tonga 1

Vanuatu 1

Micronesia 0.9

Palau 0.9

Norway 0.8

Qatar 0.8

Austria 0.7

Egypt 0.7

Fiji 0.7

United Arab Emirates 0.7

Hong Kong 0.6

Japan 0.5

Morocco 0.5

Singapore 0.5

Luxembourg 0.4

Edited by Willie
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senseless

I can't believe that colombia is higher than cote d'ivoire ... That's kinda crazy..

 

Or el salvador.. Do they still have death squads, or what? How is that even possible for such a small country.

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udonthani

it's not friggin' rocket science. Those jurisdictions with the highest rates of murder have the lowest levels of Rule of Law. Murderers think thus that they can get away with it, again and again and again.

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I can't believe that colombia is higher than cote d'ivoire ... That's kinda crazy..

 

Or el salvador.. Do they still have death squads, or what? How is that even possible for such a small country.

 

Total size of population has nothing to do with the rate, which is a measure of murders per each 100,000 persons in the population. Yes, El Salvador is still very violent, and Colombia might be less so now, but not by a whole lot. Regardless of these numbers, and those in the RP, I believe that a foreigner is much less likely to be murdered than the average person. Along that line, what these statistics do not show is that rates vary within countries, so someone living in a crime ridden area who is involved in criminal activity is very much more likely to be murdered that a rich person living in a gated subdivision. However, different people take varying degrees of risk regardless of status, and random events do happen...

Edited by Willie
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Colombia 61.1

El Salvador 56.4

Cote d'Ivoire 45.7

South Africa 39.5

Lesotho 37.3

Angola 36

Burundi 35.4

Congo, the Dem Rep of the 35.2

Sierra Leone 34

Jamaica 33.7

Venezuela 32.5

Brazil 30.8

Belize 30.1

Russian Federation 29.7

Central African Rep 29.1

Sudan 28.6

Rwanda 26.6

Guatemala 26.3

Tanzania 26.1

Equatorial Guinea 24

Zambia 22.9

Saint Kitts and Nevis 22.7

Bahamas 22.5

Botswana 21.5

Saint Lucia 21.3

Philippines 21

Mozambique 20.2

Niger 20.2

Ethiopia 19.3

Guyana 19.2

Chad 19

Korea, north 18.9

 

 

Yup ... The Philippines is up there with some real nice company ... Colombia, El Salvador, Central African Rep, Sudan, Rwanda, Botswana, Mozambique, Niger, Ethiopia, Guyana, North Korea

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yet we still live here...:welcome2:

 

Colombia 61.1

El Salvador 56.4

Cote d'Ivoire 45.7

South Africa 39.5

Lesotho 37.3

Angola 36

Burundi 35.4

Congo, the Dem Rep of the 35.2

Sierra Leone 34

Jamaica 33.7

Venezuela 32.5

Brazil 30.8

Belize 30.1

Russian Federation 29.7

Central African Rep 29.1

Sudan 28.6

Rwanda 26.6

Guatemala 26.3

Tanzania 26.1

Equatorial Guinea 24

Zambia 22.9

Saint Kitts and Nevis 22.7

Bahamas 22.5

Botswana 21.5

Saint Lucia 21.3

Philippines 21

Mozambique 20.2

Niger 20.2

Ethiopia 19.3

Guyana 19.2

Chad 19

Korea, north 18.9

 

 

Yup ... The Philippines is up there with some real nice company ... Colombia, El Salvador, Central African Rep, Sudan, Rwanda, Botswana, Mozambique, Niger, Ethiopia, Guyana, North Korea

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Like the OP says,figure higher and not lower except most likely for Columbia.With the way Law and reporting disconnect is in the philippines-it probably should be sitting on top of columbia 80.I love vietnam,thinking of moving there down the road-just a little higher then the USA,better yet thailand no murders at all.biggrin_01.gif

I correct myself thailand 8.2

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Colombia 61.1

El Salvador 56.4

Cote d'Ivoire 45.7

South Africa 39.5

Lesotho 37.3

Angola 36

Burundi 35.4

Congo, the Dem Rep of the 35.2

Sierra Leone 34

Jamaica 33.7

Venezuela 32.5

Brazil 30.8

Belize 30.1

Russian Federation 29.7

Central African Rep 29.1

Sudan 28.6

Rwanda 26.6

Guatemala 26.3

Tanzania 26.1

Equatorial Guinea 24

Zambia 22.9

Saint Kitts and Nevis 22.7

Bahamas 22.5

Botswana 21.5

Saint Lucia 21.3

Philippines 21

Mozambique 20.2

Niger 20.2

Ethiopia 19.3

Guyana 19.2

Chad 19

Korea, north 18.9

 

 

Yup ... The Philippines is up there with some real nice company ... Colombia, El Salvador, Central African Rep, Sudan, Rwanda, Botswana, Mozambique, Niger, Ethiopia, Guyana, North Korea

 

I have traveled to many of the countries in your list and would enjoy living in many of them including the RP. Lots of factors contribute to high rates. I believe that Udonthani is correct in saying that Rule of Law is low in these places, but that does not mean that only murderous thugs are behind every killing. Where rule of law is low, often vigilante justice is high. People engage in revenge killing because they do not believe the criminal justice system will serve them, and these are counted as murders, too.

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and then, again, most murders (outside of war zones - civil, etc) are committed by "friends" or family for love or money

 

Colombia 61.1

El Salvador 56.4

Cote d'Ivoire 45.7

South Africa 39.5

Lesotho 37.3

Angola 36

Burundi 35.4

Congo, the Dem Rep of the 35.2

Sierra Leone 34

Jamaica 33.7

Venezuela 32.5

Brazil 30.8

Belize 30.1

Russian Federation 29.7

Central African Rep 29.1

Sudan 28.6

Rwanda 26.6

Guatemala 26.3

Tanzania 26.1

Equatorial Guinea 24

Zambia 22.9

Saint Kitts and Nevis 22.7

Bahamas 22.5

Botswana 21.5

Saint Lucia 21.3

Philippines 21

Mozambique 20.2

Niger 20.2

Ethiopia 19.3

Guyana 19.2

Chad 19

Korea, north 18.9

 

 

Yup ... The Philippines is up there with some real nice company ... Colombia, El Salvador, Central African Rep, Sudan, Rwanda, Botswana, Mozambique, Niger, Ethiopia, Guyana, North Korea

 

I have traveled to many of the countries in your list and would enjoy living in many of them including the RP. Lots of factors contribute to high rates. I believe that Udonthani is correct in saying that Rule of Law is low in these places, but that does not mean that only murderous thugs are behind every killing. Where rule of law is low, often vigilante justice is high. People engage in revenge killing because they do not believe the criminal justice system will serve them, and these are counted as murders, too.

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I used to live in Colombia, and I was never murdered :welcome2:

 

I never felt unsafe, same as I have never felt in danger in the Philippines.

 

Luck, and also how you choose to live your life are probably the biggest factors in

whether or not you will ever be robbed or killed.

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sperman

if john howard and subsequent pm's send troops (with 67% of population against it)to an illegal war, do the serious casualties count as homicide against that treasonous bathplug and the other pm's?

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Here is another 5 they can add to those murdered here ... This one includes a retired American USAF Master Sgt.

 

This just happened

__________________________________________

 

 

5 killed in Angeles robbery

 

Friday, July 23, 2010

 

 

ANGELES CITY -- Five persons including an American national were killed by a lone robber inside an apartment along Manuela Street at Hensonville Court subdivision in Barangay Malabanias here on Thursday.

 

Police identified the victims as couples Albert and Jeanette Androneda Mitchell; housemaids Marissa Prado and Isabel Pajardo; and driver Boy Vergara.

 

Updates on President Benigno Aquino III's presidency

 

Angeles City Police Director Danilo Bautista said a special investigation task group was formed Friday to track down and arrest the killer.

 

Bautista added that the task force will be composed of the Criminal Investigation Detection Unit (Cidu)-Central Luzon, Regional Intelligence and Investigation Division (RIID), and Angeles Police Intelligence Division.

 

Bautista said they have wage a manhunt operation against the suspect who was able to escape shortly before security guard Angelito Prado, husband of Marissa Prado, learned about the incident.

 

The victims sustained gunshot wounds in the different parts of their body and were already dead when found by Prado.

 

Bautista said Prado and another unidentified guard earlier held a man who apparently came from the victims' apartment.

 

The guard reportedly called his wife at the apartment but no one answered the telephone. This prompted him to proceed to the apartment where he discovered the victims who were already dead.

 

Bautista said the guard hurriedly went back to the guard house but the suspect was no longer around.

 

The unidentified guard told police that the suspect asked permission to load his cellphone but never came back.

 

The guard said the suspect, who was wearing white shirt, about five feet and six inches in height, white complexion and in his early 30s, boarded a motorized tricycle.

 

Bautista said robbery could be the possible motive of the suspect as Mitchell's jewelry and cash were missing.

 

Responding police recovered 13 bullet shells that of a .9mm caliber pistol at the crime scene.

 

 

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/pampanga/5-killed-angeles-robbery

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Alan S

I am dubious about those statistics, as they are wildy different from many other similar stats I have seen in the past.

 

Might be accurate, but may not.

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I live in Colombia and I think the rate is down to about 39 now. It has been dropping steadily for a decade. Colombia is in rapid transformation into a country with rule of law (the opposite direction of Mexico). It has had the world's best performing currency and the stock market performed better than any other worldwide stock market from 2000-2010. What happens when law and order goes is that businesses have to start paying up for protection and corruption seeps into all areas of society. Reversing this process has been a long process in Colombia and is still happening.

 

According to the Wall Street Journal, explaining why Mexico cannot easily take the same path to recovery:

 

Edgardo Buscaglia, an Uruguayan-American academic, says countries that have successfully attacked organized crime, like the U.S., Italy and Colombia, had four elements in place: a judicial system that worked, an assault on drug gangs' assets, an attack on high-level political corruption and a program to attack the "soft-side" of the drug trade through education and work opportunities.

 

Without those, Mr. Buscaglia says any attack on organized crime will result in increased violence, as traffickers simply dedicate more resources to corruption and beating rivals.

 

Consider Mexico's decrepit judicial system. Mr. Calder

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I am dubious about those statistics, as they are wildy different from many other similar stats I have seen in the past.

 

Might be accurate, but may not.

 

The Guardian says the data come from UNdata, which includes figures from the World Health Organisation, the UN and local police forces. Where there is a conflict, ie two sets of numbers for the same year, they put them in this order: Average figures first, then Eurostat (the EU's statistics service) followed by the UN, WHO and then individual country reports. Looks like a well-structured data set to me. What other data sets do you recommend?

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