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kita / ta = we ( including the person speaking )

kami / mi = we ( excluding the person speaking )

It's not the speaker who is included or excluded. I think you need a maestra.

This is my student now, sharing what I have taught him. Good job, SkyMan!

 

kita / ta = we (including the listener or the person being spoken to, NOT the speaker)

kami / mi = we (excluding the listener or the person being spoken to, NOT the speaker)

 

 

Maybe you can join the club to find new students !

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I found this and hope it can help to those wanted to learn more bisayan language .... CebuanoStudyNotes.pdf

Balay

Jess Bartone

Exclusive means when I am speaking to you and use the word "we", but that does'nt not include you ( the person I am speaking to )

........

 

Got it!blonde.gif thanks Balay.

 

Edit: In the above sentence, do you mean ".....doesn't include..." rather than ".....doesn't not include.....", which contains a double negative meaning I am included, as in "but that doesn't (=does not) not include you, therefore it must include you".

 

Anyway, I understand about inclusive and exclusive "we".

Edited by Jesse
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Got it! thanks Balay.

 

 

 

Anyway, I understand about inclusive and exclusive "we".

 

 

 

This is not suppose to be an online tutorial.

 

These lessons are for people who meet in person. So we have something to talk about.

 

Are you going to show up on Mondays ?

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I understand the importance of learning it a certain way.

 

 

 

 

Also some "native" speaking Cebuanos presume people know the basics of how a language is constucted. The learn it from when they are young and don't even think about how the language is put together. Maybe that is why there are so few Cebuano teachers.

 

Lesson 1 we are are not goig to start talking about the verb "to Like" before the verb "to be"

 

So why would someone learn how to say "I like Ice cream" before they can say "I am", "You are", or "He/She is" ?

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Athena

This may be where Angie and I have had disagreements regarding how I speak Cebuano. For example, when I go into a place, I may ask, "Asa ang CR?" She says that is wrong. But, for a foreigner, it is simple. Granted, I understand the importance of learning it a certain way. But, how I learned it is how I learned it. Hell, I am lucky to have learned any Cebuano as bad as my memory is. But, for me, I have always, and I mean ALWAYS had Filipinos smile and get very excited when I spoke to them. I am talking about from the very beginning of me learning it, until now. They have never looked down on me due to the way I speak or express myself. "Musta man ka, day, diha?" But, perhaps that is incorrect too?

 

Personally, I don't mind how I get my point across, as long as Cebuanos / Bisaya speaking Filipinos understand. So far, I have encountered few problems in doing so. I love it no matter what, because they smile when I speak to them.

 

Personally, I don't find anything wrong with it, if you're happy then that's all that matters. But if you're spending lots of money to learn the language then its not a money well spent. I guess Angie, being a Cebuano teacher would be a purest which I can understand. As it would be the same as me, the other way round. If I speak English the way you speak Cebuano, I don't think I'll go far at work. In social setting, (where I would be the only foreigner) it would be alright in small doses

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Paul
This may be where Angie and I have had disagreements regarding how I speak Cebuano. For example, when I go into a place, I may ask, "Asa ang CR?" She says that is wrong.

 

"Musta man ka, day, diha?" But, perhaps that is incorrect too?

 

Paul, I didn't say, "Asa ang CR?" is wrong. It's correct. I only disagreed with you on the thread "Asa ko malibang?" by ElBradford. I said it's not common to just suddenly ask someone where the CR is, especially if you want to use it and you don't live there. It's ok to ask where the CR is if you are at restaurants or malls.

 

Your other sentence should be like this, "Musta man ka diha, day?" meaning "How are you there, Day?"

 

Exactly my point. Filipinos that I have spoken with over the years didn't really cared about exact grammar. The were more concerned that I cared enough to learn it.

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Paul
Personally, I don't find anything wrong with it, if you're happy then that's all that matters. But if you're spending lots of money to learn the language then its not a money well spent. I guess Angie, being a Cebuano teacher would be a purest which I can understand. As it would be the same as me, the other way round. If I speak English the way you speak Cebuano, I don't think I'll go far at work. In social setting, (where I would be the only foreigner) it would be alright in small doses
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. Like trying to teach you some naughty words, for example
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JohnFromTexas

Both sides here have valid points. If you're going to go through the effort to learn a language, you should try to do it right. There is a point to speaking correctly and why would you choose to learn incorrectly from the start so that it becomes a habit that is harder to correct later? On the other hand, 100% correct or not at least Balay is trying to help people learn without any incentive or personal gain. It's hard to knock him unless you're going to step up and really help/take over what he's doing and I haven't seen anyone volunteer that yet :chopper:

 

Is anyone else interested in meeting up on another day at a more central location? Open to suggestions for time/place.. or maybe no one else is really interested :survivor:

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eggnoggin

I want to brush up on my tagalog but my girl says once i start thinking in filipino shell have to go to the mall with me every time i go...so that nobody shows up and shoots her...takes all her shoes...clothes ...jewelry...and then the cops and i will split up the loot and my "real girlfriend" and i will move to ho chi minh city and get a big house.... :chopper:

Edited by eggnoggin
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Both sides here have valid points. If you're going to go through the effort to learn a language, you should try to do it right. There is a point to speaking correctly and why would you choose to learn incorrectly from the start so that it becomes a habit that is harder to correct later? On the other hand, 100% correct or not at least Balay is trying to help people learn without any incentive or personal gain. It's hard to knock him unless you're going to step up and really help/take over what he's doing and I haven't seen anyone volunteer that yet :chopper:

 

Is anyone else interested in meeting up on another day at a more central location? Open to suggestions for time/place.. or maybe no one else is really interested :survivor:

 

Who is to say what is right or the wrong way to learn Bisaya since it is spoken in different vernacular depending in what part of the province you are in. Some words have different meanings. New words are invented, other words become extinct.

 

You are correct. I have no personal or monetary gain from trying to help people learn Bisaya. I just want to meet other like minded people who have an interest in learning languages. That is why I enjoy meeting people from other countries who speak a different language than just English.

 

If you want to move your bowling day to any other night other than Monday, I would be interested to meet up. I am busy during the day. We can bowl and practice Bisaya at the same time.

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Paul

Tex, just as in English, and as Balay just stated, there are differences in the language throughout a single province, and certainly throughout the entire country.

 

For example, there are eight (8) major languages in this country - eight. This country, the entire country, could fit in an area about the size of one of our states, Arizona.

 

So, there are a number of differences, not only within a single language.

 

My point was, and is, that while Angie teaches what would be proper Cebuano, typically, the way I speak is just a bit different... kind of like Yankee and Southern English, if you see my point. Typically though, I do try to speak proper Cebuano and will certainly appreciate anyone correcting me. I am only saying that, in most cases, the Filipinos are not asking me what I said, because they were unable to understand me.

 

In fact, in my years here, I have had very few issues with Cebuanos understanding me. After all, at least I am trying to learn.

 

---------------------------------

 

Oh, not to mention, I am trying to add words, which do not currently exist, to the Cebuano Language.

 

For meals, there is:

 

1. Breakfast - pamahaw

 

2. Lunch - paniudto

 

3. (Dinner) Supper - panihapon

 

And the one I have added, because Filipinos eat all the time!

4. Late night snack - panigabii :chopper:

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Paul

Balay, you mentioned corrections. While this isn't a correction, it is another use for the word "taas".

 

While it can mean long or tall, if pronounced differently, it means upstairs too.

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