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shadow

I have just started the U.S. IR-1 imigrant visa process for my wife. Since I hold a 13a permanent residence visa here in the PI, I can file the IR-1 visa directly though the U.S. Embassy using the "Direct Consular File" (DCF) option.

 

I was told that it tkes about 8 months to get her IR-1 visa approved by using the DCF option (instead of the regular 1 year wait) .... we shall see.

 

Anyway, about 2 weeks ago we went to the Embassy and submitted all the paperwork.

 

Here is how it went so far:

 

To initially file for this visa, bring the below listed documents to the U.S. Embassy in Manila on Monday through Friday between 8:00am and 12:00pm to window 35: No appointment is necessary. Total time I spent at the Embassy was approx. 1.5 hours.

 

If you have any questions, call the Dept. of Homeland Security at 02-301-2000 Ext: 2224 or 2379

 

1. I-130 application.

 

2. G-325A application (myself) with 2 passport photos (2

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The Mason

The Philippines is regarded as a country with a high rate of visa fraud, so its harder than normal to get a visa issued here. They deliberately put up extra barriers to help them catch the fraudulent applications.

 

Robert...please post your experience with the interview when you have it.

 

I'm in a similar situation as you (living for several years in the Philippines) and I'm concerned about passing the domicile requirement. Any info you have on the interview will be appreciated.

 

 

WHICH domicile requirement? If you are filing DCF, (direct Consular filing) there is a domicile requirement for both the Philippines and the US.

 

Generally what they want for Philippines domicile requirement is absolute proof that you live here. A 13A visa is helpful but not required. If you have leases, bills, autos, etc. in your name for several years here this will generally be enough.

 

As for US domicile, they want to see that you have a home to go to. It does not have to be yours, the home of a friend/relative will be fine. Motel 6 will not qualify. At the interview just tell them that you will be staying with the friend/relative until you get your own place.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

 

Thanks Larry. I was asking about the US domicile requirement. If that's all they want to know, I'll meet those requirements no problem. We're at the medical clearance stage, so sounds like we already passed the domicile test and I just didn't know it.

Edited by The Mason
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smokey

I have just started the U.S. IR-1 imigrant visa process for my wife. Since I hold a 13a permanent residence visa here in the PI, I can file the IR-1 visa directly though the U.S. Embassy using the "Direct Consular File" (DCF) option.

 

I was told that it tkes about 8 months to get her IR-1 visa approved by using the DCF option (instead of the regular 1 year wait) .... we shall see.

 

Anyway, about 2 weeks ago we went to the Embassy and submitted all the paperwork.

 

Here is how it went so far:

 

To initially file for this visa, bring the below listed documents to the U.S. Embassy in Manila on Monday through Friday between 8:00am and 12:00pm to window 35: No appointment is necessary. Total time I spent at the Embassy was approx. 1.5 hours.

 

If you have any questions, call the Dept. of Homeland Security at 02-301-2000 Ext: 2224 or 2379

 

1. I-130 application.

 

2. G-325A application (myself) with 2 passport photos (2

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smokey

The Philippines is regarded as a country with a high rate of visa fraud, so its harder than normal to get a visa issued here. They deliberately put up extra barriers to help them catch the fraudulent applications.

 

Robert...please post your experience with the interview when you have it.

 

I'm in a similar situation as you (living for several years in the Philippines) and I'm concerned about passing the domicile requirement. Any info you have on the interview will be appreciated.

 

 

WHICH domicile requirement? If you are filing DCF, (direct Consular filing) there is a domicile requirement for both the Philippines and the US.

 

Generally what they want for Philippines domicile requirement is absolute proof that you live here. A 13A visa is helpful but not required. If you have leases, bills, autos, etc. in your name for several years here this will generally be enough.

 

As for US domicile, they want to see that you have a home to go to. It does not have to be yours, the home of a friend/relative will be fine. Motel 6 will not qualify. At the interview just tell them that you will be staying with the friend/relative until you get your own place.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

 

Thanks Larry. I was asking about the US domicile requirement. If that's all they want to know, I'll meet those requirements no problem. We're at the medical clearance stage, so sounds like we already passed the domicile test and I just didn't know it.

 

 

 

 

they ask the wife questions and you not allowed to ans. for her ... for us... husbands birthday childrens birthday husband prior occupation ,, etc

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there is going to be another 200 for St. Lukes and another 400 for the visa itself and make sure she has NBI under her maiden name and YOU have any and all divorce stuff in you hand ... we saw about 15% of the people denied visa some were crying and some were mad

 

So, my wife will need to get an NBI clearance at some point in time before she gets her IR-1 visa?

 

Will the Embassy tell us when this has to be complete, or are we supposed to already know about this requirement by looking into a crystal ball or somehow by telepathy?

 

The NBI clearance has to be in her maiden name? .... Her drivers license and PI passport now have been changed to my last name .... So she needs to get some ID that has her old maiden name on it before she goes to the NBI to get her clearance?

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The Mason

 

there is going to be another 200 for St. Lukes and another 400 for the visa itself and make sure she has NBI under her maiden name and YOU have any and all divorce stuff in you hand ... we saw about 15% of the people denied visa some were crying and some were mad

 

So, my wife will need to get an NBI clearance at some point in time before she gets her IR-1 visa?

 

Will the Embassy tell us when this has to be complete, or are we supposed to already know about this requirement by looking into a crystal ball or somehow by telepathy?

 

The NBI clearance has to be in her maiden name? .... Her drivers license and PI passport now have been changed to my last name .... So she needs to get some ID that has her old maiden name on it before she goes to the NBI to get her clearance?

 

Once your I-130 petition is approved by the USCIS, your case will be forwarded to the National Visa Center for processing. The NVC sends you a check list of required documents, which includes an NBI clearance. Needing a clearance in both her maiden and married name is a new one for me. I haven't seen that listed as a requirement anywhere before, but my wife will be heading down to NBI in the near future to get a second clearance.

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smokey

 

there is going to be another 200 for St. Lukes and another 400 for the visa itself and make sure she has NBI under her maiden name and YOU have any and all divorce stuff in you hand ... we saw about 15% of the people denied visa some were crying and some were mad

 

So, my wife will need to get an NBI clearance at some point in time before she gets her IR-1 visa?

 

Will the Embassy tell us when this has to be complete, or are we supposed to already know about this requirement by looking into a crystal ball or somehow by telepathy?

 

The NBI clearance has to be in her maiden name? .... Her drivers license and PI passport now have been changed to my last name .... So she needs to get some ID that has her old maiden name on it before she goes to the NBI to get her clearance?

 

 

 

 

 

hey every day is a new surprise.. my wife was told by the embassy to get an NBI done in her maiden name which surprised us... and also they wanted to see the annulment papers to make sure she did not get the annulment based on her being crazy ... and now my 1975 divorce papers are needed when you ask why they just smile and say ok let us know when you have this information

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smokey

 

there is going to be another 200 for St. Lukes and another 400 for the visa itself and make sure she has NBI under her maiden name and YOU have any and all divorce stuff in you hand ... we saw about 15% of the people denied visa some were crying and some were mad

 

So, my wife will need to get an NBI clearance at some point in time before she gets her IR-1 visa?

 

Will the Embassy tell us when this has to be complete, or are we supposed to already know about this requirement by looking into a crystal ball or somehow by telepathy?

 

The NBI clearance has to be in her maiden name? .... Her drivers license and PI passport now have been changed to my last name .... So she needs to get some ID that has her old maiden name on it before she goes to the NBI to get her clearance?

 

Once your I-130 petition is approved by the USCIS, your case will be forwarded to the National Visa Center for processing. The NVC sends you a check list of required documents, which includes an NBI clearance. Needing a clearance in both her maiden and married name is a new one for me. I haven't seen that listed as a requirement anywhere before, but my wife will be heading down to NBI in the near future to get a second clearance.

 

 

 

 

my wife had everything they asked for but they will blind side you if they want.. where does it say if the women has an annulment she needs to bring the FULL court documents so the doctor can read them to see if your in need of a doctor before going to the US as i have said before most of US could not pass our own embassy process , i had my second divorce papers from 1990 there and really did not expect to be asked for something OVER 30 years ago and how it has anything to do with her visa application today is beyond me maybe its just a power thing there was a guy in the next room and we could here what was said and after all the bullshit to include his passing the physical , the pre interview he was denied a visa to be with his wife who petitioned him and his children that was already in the US and he asked why and they said he has a prior arrest in his record something to do with bad checks 3 years earlier and he said i settled that with the person and they still said ... Sorry no visa

Edited by robert51
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Most of the Mexicans that cross the border into the US don't have to put up with all this shit!

 

Can't hardly blame them either ... All 12 million or more of them!

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shadow

 

there is going to be another 200 for St. Lukes and another 400 for the visa itself and make sure she has NBI under her maiden name and YOU have any and all divorce stuff in you hand ... we saw about 15% of the people denied visa some were crying and some were mad

 

So, my wife will need to get an NBI clearance at some point in time before she gets her IR-1 visa?

 

Will the Embassy tell us when this has to be complete, or are we supposed to already know about this requirement by looking into a crystal ball or somehow by telepathy?

 

The NBI clearance has to be in her maiden name? .... Her drivers license and PI passport now have been changed to my last name .... So she needs to get some ID that has her old maiden name on it before she goes to the NBI to get her clearance?

 

 

It is quite true that you are at the mercy of the interviewer, if they want to jerk you around they certainly have the power to do so. Surprises are always expected in this process. Regulations and requirements change on a whim in a matter of seconds, and anyone caught in the midst is just sh** out of luck. You must comply with their whims.

 

The best one can do is go very well prepared and very organized. The interviewers have a quota to meet, and one thing that will get one turned away very fast is someone who does not have their papers in order. We instruct all our clients in how to be able to produce any document in 3 seconds. We have never had anyone not pass the interview yet.

 

Larry in Dumaguete

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hey every day is a new surprise.. my wife was told by the embassy to get an NBI done in her maiden name which surprised us... and also they wanted to see the annulment papers to make sure she did not get the annulment based on her being crazy ... and now my 1975 divorce papers are needed when you ask why they just smile and say ok let us know when you have this information

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so how do i find a copy of a divorce from 1975 in california any ideas...

 

 

You MUST need to contact the court where your divorce took place to get the copy of your divorce decree. There will be a fee of few dollars ($6-$7) for each certified copy of divorce decree. And since you might not be able to go the court personally being outside the US then you should contact (preferbably by calling) the supervisor of court-clerk (of matrimonial division) to obtain the copies of your divorce decree. You will be required to send/fax/email the copy of your govt. issued identification such as US driving license or US passport to make such a request along with paying the fees to obtain such documents which you can pay by credit cards to most courts. The sole reason to contact supervisor is- so that supervisor could accept your request from oversees and mail you the copies of divorce papers to you at abroad upon request and paying fees+postages. It's better to obtain at least 3 certified copies.

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I'm sure you guys know this fact but still want to mention it. If a foreigner/alien who is a US green card holder or an immigrant visa holder would stay more often outside the US then s/he will risk to lose her/his permanent residency in the US because it's a violation of US immigration laws to use an immigrant visa for non-immigrant intent. The US officials at the ports do check often to know where a LPR is residing most of the time to regulate US immigration laws. I'm sure many US LPRs (US Legal Permanent Resident) have been getting away by coming to the US only once a year to keep their status but one can never tell when US govt. will find out about their motive to revoke their status. And this could be problematic, in my opinion, for Americans who are living in the Philippines on a 13a visa (immigrant visa) but now trying to secure US legal residency for their Filippino spouse. If their Filipino spouse wouldn't live in the US most of the time after obtaining a LPR then they will risk losing their status. By the same token, if these American will stay outside the Philippines for so long or most of the times, like staying in America, then they will risk losing their 13a visa in the Philippines. I've personally seen many people, vice-verce, having lost their status. Just something to consider.

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tom_shor

 

there is going to be another 200 for St. Lukes and another 400 for the visa itself and make sure she has NBI under her maiden name and YOU have any and all divorce stuff in you hand ... we saw about 15% of the people denied visa some were crying and some were mad

 

So, my wife will need to get an NBI clearance at some point in time before she gets her IR-1 visa?

 

Will the Embassy tell us when this has to be complete, or are we supposed to already know about this requirement by looking into a crystal ball or somehow by telepathy?

 

The NBI clearance has to be in her maiden name? .... Her drivers license and PI passport now have been changed to my last name .... So she needs to get some ID that has her old maiden name on it before she goes to the NBI to get her clearance?

 

 

You can get information about the paperwork requirements and the visa process from the offial US Embassy website. Also copies of any forms you need can be downloaded to be sure you have the current ones. You have to look around a little but there is a lot of information there.

 

 

We got a letter from the embassy but had to download the checklist from the website.

 

I believe in the application instructions it says you need to provide copies of divorces from all previous marrages. I know I read it somewhere when we were doing the papers. They are usually pretty clear about what documents they want. I read the instructions about five or six times and highlighted things to be sure I didn't miss anything.

Edited by tom_shor
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SkyMan

 

there is going to be another 200 for St. Lukes and another 400 for the visa itself and make sure she has NBI under her maiden name and YOU have any and all divorce stuff in you hand ... we saw about 15% of the people denied visa some were crying and some were mad

 

So, my wife will need to get an NBI clearance at some point in time before she gets her IR-1 visa?

 

Will the Embassy tell us when this has to be complete, or are we supposed to already know about this requirement by looking into a crystal ball or somehow by telepathy?

 

The NBI clearance has to be in her maiden name? .... Her drivers license and PI passport now have been changed to my last name .... So she needs to get some ID that has her old maiden name on it before she goes to the NBI to get her clearance?

 

Once your I-130 petition is approved by the USCIS, your case will be forwarded to the National Visa Center for processing. The NVC sends you a check list of required documents, which includes an NBI clearance. Needing a clearance in both her maiden and married name is a new one for me. I haven't seen that listed as a requirement anywhere before, but my wife will be heading down to NBI in the near future to get a second clearance.

 

 

 

 

my wife had everything they asked for but they will blind side you if they want.. where does it say if the women has an annulment she needs to bring the FULL court documents so the doctor can read them to see if your in need of a doctor before going to the US as i have said before most of US could not pass our own embassy process , i had my second divorce papers from 1990 there and really did not expect to be asked for something OVER 30 years ago and how it has anything to do with her visa application today is beyond me maybe its just a power thing there was a guy in the next room and we could here what was said and after all the bullshit to include his passing the physical , the pre interview he was denied a visa to be with his wife who petitioned him and his children that was already in the US and he asked why and they said he has a prior arrest in his record something to do with bad checks 3 years earlier and he said i settled that with the person and they still said ... Sorry no visa

Actually, I'm a little curious how you got married without your first divorce papers. Did you not mention you were twice divorced when you got your Affidavit in Lieu of CENOMAR or did the embassy/consulate just assume that if you were married and divorced a 2nd time that your first marriage must somehow have been terminated? Perhaps the visa people must realize that that may not have been the case.

Edited by SkyMan
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The Mason

I'm sure you guys know this fact but still want to mention it. If a foreigner/alien who is a US green card holder or an immigrant visa holder would stay more often outside the US then s/he will risk to lose her/his permanent residency in the US because it's a violation of US immigration laws to use an immigrant visa for non-immigrant intent. The US officials at the ports do check often to know where a LPR is residing most of the time to regulate US immigration laws. I'm sure many US LPRs (US Legal Permanent Resident) have been getting away by coming to the US only once a year to keep their status but one can never tell when US govt. will find out about their motive to revoke their status. And this could be problematic, in my opinion, for Americans who are living in the Philippines on a 13a visa (immigrant visa) but now trying to secure US legal residency for their Filippino spouse. If their Filipino spouse wouldn't live in the US most of the time after obtaining a LPR then they will risk losing their status. By the same token, if these American will stay outside the Philippines for so long or most of the times, like staying in America, then they will risk losing their 13a visa in the Philippines. I've personally seen many people, vice-verce, having lost their status. Just something to consider.

 

My wife said I'm free to return to the Philippines if I want to while she works towards her US citizen status. If we wind up in that situation, hopefully she'll send me a remittance every month.

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