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Thirteen more Bantayan resorts eyed for demolition


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Thirteen more Bantayan resorts eyed for demolition

By Jessica Ann R. Pareja/BRP

(The Freeman) Updated May 30, 2010 12:00 AM

 

CEBU, Philippines - Thirteen more beach resorts in Bantayan Island are being eyed for demolition after initial inspection and inventory by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources showed these resorts have also violated the Water Code of the Philippines for building structures within the 20-meter from the shore easement zone.

 

These 13 others were apart from the six that DENR-7 have started demolishing by virtue of the writ of execution on the order promulgated by Regional Trial Court judge Marilyn Yap.

 

The order dated August 25, 2009 mandated the demolition and removal of illegal structures found in Abaniko Beach Resort, Tickety Boo Beach Resort, Yoonek Beach Resort, Kota Beach Resort, Marlin Beach Resort and St. Bernard Beach Resort.

 

The demolition started last Saturday at the Marlin Beach Resort where the demolition team destroyed a concrete seawall and five kiosks.

 

Today, the team is set to demolish the constructed seawall, five kiosks, concrete fence and two rest houses in Kota Beach Resort.

 

DENR Regional Public Affairs Officer Eddie Llamedo said they intend to finish the demolition of the illegal structures built by these six resorts by Friday this week.

 

Llamedo said that during the initial inventory they conducted in Bantayan Island, they found 13 other beach resorts that have structures built within the 20-meter easement zone that is supposedly available for public use in the interest of recreation, navigation, fishing and salvage.

 

He said they will conduct another inventory, this time including all islands and islets in Central Visayas, to confirm these 13 beach resorts and find other establishments violating environmental laws.

 

Once they have the necessary evidence, DENR will be filing a petition before the court to issue a Writ of Kalikasan that will authorize them to demolish illegal structures along the shore.

 

Llamedo said that resorts that are already aware of their violation are encouraged to do their adjustments before DENR demolishes them to lessen the incurred damage.

 

The estimated damage for the six beach resorts mentioned is pegged at P3 million. Tickety Boo beach resort has the largest damage at P1.5 million.

 

Marlin Beach Resort, the first resort demolished has temporarily closed until such time they will be able to rehabilitate their area by doing the necessary adjustments on their structures.

 

The petitioner for the removal of the illegal structures on these six resorts cite environmental, scientific and sanitary reasons why the beaches and seashores should be kept open. (THE FREEMAN)

http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=579735&publicationSubCategoryId=107

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If I thought, for even a minute, that the government actions would help preserve shoreline for future generations of filipinos, I would suggest the gov't do what they have to do and compensate the inj

Hi...I agree you, speking for my self only, our place is and has never been blocked for any in matter of access......only seems like they starts with few small once like us who actually has followed t

Someone raised my attention to this thread, thats why the late reply.   You know what? feck them all at these authorities ... I can say it without looking at the resorts and whatever they did. Why t

tom_shor

Sounds like someone with money is ready to muscle in.

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Wow, that's a shocker. And you could be right.

 

Hmm, we were planning to go up there in 2 weeks -not sure what we will find when we do. Had been planning to stay at Marlin...

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Paul
Tickety Boo beach resort has the largest damage at P1.5 million.

 

You know, I feel sorry for the other resorts, especially the owners of Yoonek Beach Resort and St. Bernard Beach Resort, mainly because I know these guys.

 

But, Ol' Bill Charlton, owner of Tickety Boo Beach Resort, well, he deserves all that he gets. It couldn't happen to a nicer guy.

 

You know, his wife finally had enough of him, and him fecking around on her, that she finally left the resort. I wish she had kicked his ass out of the resort, and all the way back to England.

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Jess Bartone
after initial inspection and inventory by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources showed these resorts have also violated the Water Code of the Philippines for building structures within the 20-meter from the shore easement zone.

In my research and random net surfing for information on the Philippines, I have seen literally hundreds of photos of resorts with some kind of structures on the beach, some with jettys running out over the water with dining platforms and even sleeping cabins. Are all of these illegal, or can some kind of permit be obtained?

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Bet_Busta

Sounds like someone with money is ready to muscle in.

 

Damn if you do and damn if you don't.

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Tickety Boo beach resort has the largest damage at P1.5 million.

 

You know, I feel sorry for the other resorts, especially the owners of Yoonek Beach Resort and St. Bernard Beach Resort, mainly because I know these guys.

 

But, Ol' Bill Charlton, owner of Tickety Boo Beach Resort, well, he deserves all that he gets. It couldn't happen to a nicer guy.

 

You know, his wife finally had enough of him, and him fecking around on her, that she finally left the resort. I wish she had kicked his ass out of the resort, and all the way back to England.

 

I met this guy from Tickety Boo a few weeks back, he was pissed at 3pm in a bar in Santa Fee and mouthing off big time.He is real thick....

 

Feel real sorry for Mr Fleming, owner of saint Bernard he a real neat bloke. We are to stay there this week, in his case I suspect just the sea wall will be effected and at least his beloved birds will be OK.

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easy44
after initial inspection and inventory by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources showed these resorts have also violated the Water Code of the Philippines for building structures within the 20-meter from the shore easement zone.

In my research and random net surfing for information on the Philippines, I have seen literally hundreds of photos of resorts with some kind of structures on the beach, some with jettys running out over the water with dining platforms and even sleeping cabins. Are all of these illegal, or can some kind of permit be obtained?

Yup, all of it illegal and the owners knew this was coming. They did the same thing in Malapascua a year or two ago, so it wasn't a secret. I think it's actually a good thing. It's about time the government started protecting the natural resources for posterity instead of looking the other way while while they are plundered.

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Just returned from Bantayan having spent 5 days there, enjoyed ourselves but the only down side was the the rubbish on the beaches and in the water, in particular south of where we stayed in Tristans. Wish the relevant authority would clean up the beaches as well as what they r doing now in relation to demolition of illegal structures.

 

 

Cheers

Mark

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spooks
after initial inspection and inventory by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources showed these resorts have also violated the Water Code of the Philippines for building structures within the 20-meter from the shore easement zone.

In my research and random net surfing for information on the Philippines, I have seen literally hundreds of photos of resorts with some kind of structures on the beach, some with jettys running out over the water with dining platforms and even sleeping cabins. Are all of these illegal, or can some kind of permit be obtained?

 

 

Jesse,

 

Yes you can get apply for a permit from the DENR its called a Foreshore Lease. This can be granted if the beach area is already enclosed so its not a natural walk way. Also if local fisherman are using it they have rights of way etc. Getting a lease may be expensive and you may have to agree access to fisher folks etc.

 

I am looking at such a lease arrangement at the moment and the stumbling block is the access issues for local fishermen. This will involve protracted negotiations.

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JamesMusslewhite

The government has the right to impose their rules and laws. It sounds like a just venture. There are some expats as well as locals too who will be effected. To impose laws to protect the over all beauty, health, and protection of the ecology an environment is a righteous act. These resorts are well in their right to rebuild their resorts, this time they will have to consider the rights, laws, and environment impact of the land.

 

To say that it is only so someone with more money can move in, is a shallow statement. Even if large resort corporations do move into this area, they will be held to the same restrictions. They will also be providing much needed support businesses and employment opportunities. There is not a country in the industrial world that does not and has not done the same.

 

This is a good thing for these communities and this country. Conform to their rules or move, refuse to comply and you will be moved; Simple.:shitstormretarded:

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But James, isn't it a similar situation here in mactan, as far as public access is concerned? In Bantayan you can swim from any beach, but not here. The beaches are supposed to allow public access, but most resorts here have privatized them, especially the best locations.

 

Also, many structures right at water's edge; Shangri La for example...

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Bet_Busta

But James, isn't it a similar situation here in mactan, as far as public access is concerned? In Bantayan you can swim from any beach, but not here. The beaches are supposed to allow public access, but most resorts here have privatized them, especially the best locations.

 

Also, many structures right at water's edge; Shangri La for example...

 

There are certain areas considered as costal tourism zone.

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Jess Bartone

If you copy and paste these co-ordinates: 10 15'50"N 123 59'14.44"E into Google Earth it will zoom into an area of permanent structures in the water. So if these areas are considered as "coastal tourism zones", and are somehow exempt, how is it that Bantayan, which is also a high tourism zone, is being targeted for the demolitions? What it sounds like to me is that whilst the law is applied equally to everyone, if you're a billionaire, the method of application changes.

 

I agree with James, coastal areas should be preserved, but in light of the last few posts, I tend to believe the theory that billionaire developers have their eye on Bantayan as the next Boracay. I would be willing to bet that after the dust has settled in a few years, a new crop of beachside structures will emerge on Bantayan.

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JamesMusslewhite

But James, isn't it a similar situation here in mactan, as far as public access is concerned? In Bantayan you can swim from any beach, but not here. The beaches are supposed to allow public access, but most resorts here have privatized them, especially the best locations.

 

Also, many structures right at water's edge; Shangri La for example...

 

That is a shame. Beaches should have free access, and a free access policy should be imposed within a reasonable distance from the waterline. Above that zoned area then beach access restrictions can be imposed by land owners. This allows them to maintain their property, equipment, and security of their customers and patrons. I own a small beach lot and would never impose restriction as to access to the beach line. My lot goes to the waters edge but my fence is well off the water's edge. People should be allowed full access to the water's edge and associated beach line.

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