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Status of immigrant visa (13a) being widower or divorcee...


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lazydays

As if religion doesn't cause enough problems in the world.

 

From my own experience,being a divorced non catholic christian,wanting to marry a catholic,catholic church wedding was totally out of the question,in fact, even if i had wanted to,i could not convert to catholasism being a divorcee.

Simple solution,we had a civil wedding,later after much discussion we both decided to convert to Baptist (my wifes idea) so we both could be part of the same church.

It actually paid a dividend,as being part of the Baptist community enhanced my wifes career,through the contacts we made.

Her family were not too happy about her converting,but grew to accept it.

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RogerDuMond

A priest where you live. The Ecclesiastical Tribunal does not and will not talk to you. If you contact a priest in the Philippines he will tell you to go to your own diocese in New York. You can still marry a girl in the Philippines, just not in the church which is often important to a Filipina. You will have to have a civil ceremony.

 

Here is a broad picture of this person's personal situation, whom I'm asking all these questions for. He is a US citizen and a non-Catholic. He is married to a Filipina who is a US LPR (a green card holder in the US). His wife is a Catholic and she has obtained her US permanent residency by virtue of being married to him. Prior to marrying with his current wife, he was married twice. His first marriage was with his current wife in 1995 whom he married in a Catholic Church. That was first marriage for both of them. They were divorced in 1997. He then married to another woman in 1998 in a court who wasn't a Filipina. He got divorce from her second wife in 2001 as he was always in love with his first wife and always lived together with his first wife despite of being divorce from his first wife and also being married to his second wife. I know it seems different and I don't know the whole fact why all this happened nor it matters. He now got remarried with his first wife in a civil court whom he always been living together with. Both of them now want to get married in a Catholic Church in the PH. Please keep it in mind that both of them were previously married to each other in a Catholic Church, and that it's a third marriage for the guy and the second one for his wife in term of number.

 

As per the information provided by you about them first getting an annulment from a Catholic Church in order to get re-married in a Catholic Church then I wonder if such annulment will be entered in the record in a place where an annulment will take place? The guy doesn't want to jeopardize the immigration status of his current and previous wife as they obtained US LPR thru him, and obtaining such an annulment in order to get married in a Catholic Church could void their immigration status.

 

I understand that these folks can have a civil ceremony but can't marry in the Church, but as you said by yourself that Church wedding is so important to almost every Filipina. That's why they are looking answers to all these questions.

 

By the way, this is not about my situation as some might think of it since some folks are so quick to pass a judgment. : )

This is what I believe from your description. As far as the church would be concerned the second and third marriage are void and never happened. This is because the first marriage was a sacramental marriage as far as the church is concerned and that can not be ended by civil adjudication. Therefore the first marriage is still the only valid marriage. I believe that all they would have to do is renew their vows in the church if they wanted to. This isn't really required for the church to recognize their marriage as the first sacramental marriage never ended. They don't need an annulment, but they should still talk to a priest.

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RogerDuMond

As if religion doesn't cause enough problems in the world.

 

From my own experience,being a divorced non catholic christian,wanting to marry a catholic,catholic church wedding was totally out of the question,in fact, even if i had wanted to,i could not convert to catholasism being a divorcee.

Simple solution,we had a civil wedding,later after much discussion we both decided to convert to Baptist (my wifes idea) so we both could be part of the same church.

It actually paid a dividend,as being part of the Baptist community enhanced my wifes career,through the contacts we made.

Her family were not too happy about her converting,but grew to accept it.

You don't need to convert to Catholicism to be married in the Catholic church. All you would have had to do is have an annulment and promise to raise any children as Catholics.

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lazydays

Thanks for the info,although its now all in the past

It might help some one else though,which is why i brought it up.

Edited by lazydays
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Then it seems that this couple would just need to renew their vows in the church if they wanted to. Just want to add something to his situation that I mistakenly forgot to mention above. He is not even a Christian. But then I believe, based on the information provided by you, that be a Catholic is not even necessary to have a Church wedding. By the way, just want to confirm something- civil marriages and divorces don't play any role for a Church wedding, right?

 

Thanks for sharing much needed information.

 

 

As far as the church would be concerned the second and third marriage are void and never happened. This is because the first marriage was a sacramental marriage as far as the church is concerned and that can not be ended by civil adjudication. Therefore the first marriage is still the only valid marriage. I believe that all they would have to do is renew their vows in the church if they wanted to. This isn't really required for the church to recognize their marriage as the first sacramental marriage never ended. They don't need an annulment, but they should still talk to a priest.

Edited by SAM_NY
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RogerDuMond

Then it seems that this couple would just need to renew their vows in the church if they wanted to. Just want to add something to his situation that I mistakenly forgot to mention above. He is not even a Christian. But then I believe, based on the information provided by you, that be a Catholic is not even necessary to have a Church wedding. By the way, just want to confirm something- civil marriages and divorces don't play any role for a Church wedding, right?

It didn't make a difference the first time they were married in the church so it wouldn't make a difference for renewing their vows.

 

I didn't say that they don't make a difference. I said in this case the second and third marriages, the civil ceremonies, don't make a difference because the same two people were married for marriage number one in the Catholic Church and the church doesn't consider this sacramental marriage to have ended.

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