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KennyF

Self Sufficiency.

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KennyF

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A few things came out of the HUGE discussion about milk today (two threads, who would believe it) and one of them was "do it yourself" foods and the like.

 

Lets face it, life can be a little dull once you retire here and employ people to do most of the things that you would previously done for your self. And besides, everyone needs a hobby.

 

I regularly make yogurt, 2 liters or more a week. It has 99% stopped my gastric reflux and I guess at my age you need to consume an elevated quantity of calcium (which SMB is apparently low in).

 

About twice a year I make salami, and my friends tell me it's better than any store bought. The reason I don't make it more often is that I get hobug and sit in front of the computer chatting on DIA and consume half a kilo at a time. I don't need that much fat. I normal eat about 100 grams of lean meat a day.

 

I have often in the past made bread but I have a problem in that my arthritic wrists are no good for kneading but fortunately there's a guy here on the island that makes great wholemeal bread, no additives. When I have a companion, we make our own. Wholemeal flour and cracked wheat from the market.

 

Salt eggs were a favourite until my blood pressure went crazy.

 

 

We try to grow a few bits and pieces but not on a large scale, mostly playing.

 

Butternut pumpkins, tomatoes etc.

 

Not a food but definitely a necessity on Ant Island (Camiguin) I make Terro (USA) AntRid (Aust).

 

Like I said earlier, it's as much about keeping busy as anything else.

 

Kenny on Camiguin

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DeezNuz

Damned dude...we're the same. I also do a lot of things on my own..if only to keep my sanity.

 

 

When I feel hungry...I'm the one to tell my maid to cook me something.

When I need to repaint the house...I go directly to the phone and start dialing the painter.

I wanted a new dog house, I immediately had my secretary call Anything Timber.

I need my car detailed...I pick up the cell phone and text my cousin to come over.

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broden

how about a nice how too on that salami?

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fanboat

Damned dude...we're the same. I also do a lot of things on my own..if only to keep my sanity.

 

 

When I feel hungry...I'm the one to tell my maid to cook me something.

When I need to repaint the house...I go directly to the phone and start dialing the painter.

I wanted a new dog house, I immediately had my secretary call Anything Timber.

I need my car detailed...I pick up the cell phone and text my cousin to come over.

 

 

Good one Rob....you sound like my dad.

 

 

ps....dad can I take the rice rocket out this weekend?

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Jess Bartone

Yeah Kenny, what's involved in making salami? Where do you get the skins?

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fanboat

Keep active...thats easy...go under the water...get out find your self some of that sourdough bread and some fresh cheddar cheese...drink a real cold beer...read a chapter and jump back in with the fish...so peaceful...make some love eat dinner,watch a mmovie,come to linc and bullshit your way to fame...what else is there

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KennyF

Yeah Kenny, what's involved in making salami? Where do you get the skins?

 

You ask, I deliver.

Salami is very easy and good fun to make but the equipment can be a problem to find.

 

I bought an electric grinder/sausage stuffer from White Gold for about 3,500 I think it was.

 

Then came the problem of skins.

 

In the end a friend bought some from a butcher in Brisbane and brought them over for me.

 

Turns out they actually came from Mexico. Well traveled hog guts.

 

OK, first up, I ground some pork and quickly found out that you need heaps of fat to make a good sausage.

 

Tried packaged ground pork from SM which was at a guess 25% fat and it turned out to be just right.

 

To two kilos of ground pork I added ....

 

2 whole cloves of garlic finely chopped

 

4 teaspoon NON Iodized salt

 

4 teaspoons ground black pepper

 

6 table spoons Quaker quick oats

 

2 table spoons brown sugar

 

2 tablespoons McCormick Italian herbs

 

2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

2 bottles Yakult

 

2 teaspoons Prague powder.

 

Mixed for 5 minutes and then stuffed into hog casing.

 

At 14 days hanging (see pic in previous post) it's downright delicious.

 

As I said, easy and good fun but you really do need a machine.

 

After shrinkage while drying, you end up with about 1400 grams so it's quite cheap too..

 

K on C

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broden

nice thanks for the post .. not sure when but sooner or later i'm sure we'll be making some .. i love salami

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Jess Bartone

I had never realised before that a bacterium was used in the curing. Awesome post Kenny, encore.

 

I used to know (he passed away) an old Italian man who made his own preserved meats like pancetta (rolled pickled pork belly), prosciutto (which is kind of like a cross between ham and bacon), pickled trotters (feet) and a few others including his own salami recipe.

 

D'you reckon olives would grow on Camiguin?

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KennyF

I had never realised before that a bacterium was used in the curing.

 

Yup. Salami, metwurst and so on are "fermented" or whatever the word is with germs..

 

>>D'you reckon olives would grow on Camiguin?

I don't know but I doubt it. Too wet.

 

K on C

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Jess Bartone

I will do some googling for growing olives in the tropics, but I'm thinking a very large, raised bed, say 2 metres square and 1 metre high filled with a very open and friable soil would help a lot.

 

Chooks, goats, pigs, coconuts, fruit trees and open pollenated non-hybrid vegetables, maybe even some olives and a few nut trees, sell the surplus and you're close to being self sufficient. Oh yeah, brewing beer from scratch.

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KennyF

I will do some googling for growing olives in the tropics, but I'm thinking a very large, raised bed, say 2 metres square and 1 metre high filled with a very open and friable soil would help a lot.

 

Chooks, goats, pigs, coconuts, fruit trees and open pollenated non-hybrid vegetables, maybe even some olives and a few nut trees, sell the surplus and you're close to being self sufficient. Oh yeah, brewing beer from scratch.

 

With olives, I notice they grow in hot dry regions like Greece, Italy and the dry parts of Australia. They also tend to grow in shitty soil. A bigger problem would be the wait to harvest any decent quantity. I think you'd be waiting 10 years.

Chooks, yes, big barnevelders or RI reds. The local chickens are like pigeons.

Goats, forget it, every man and his dog has them.

Pigs, BAD NEWS. There's a saying, invest in whatever you want but not taxis, a bar, or pigs.

Coconuts, waste of time unless done on a BIG scale. They only bring in about 20 pesos each. Use the land for pumpkins or melons.

And beer, cheaper to drink Red Horse at 40 pesos a liter.

 

What might work is hydroponics done in a professional way.

You would need to get it up and running and then line up customers like the local hotels to take minimum quantity at a set price.

 

 

 

 

K on C

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Paul

Kenny, would you be so kind as to post that recipe in the Foods & Restaurants Forum, please? I had considered splitting this thread, but it part of your topic at hand.

Edited by Admin

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KennyF

I will do some googling for growing olives in the tropics, but I'm thinking a very large, raised bed, say 2 metres square and 1 metre high filled with a very open and friable soil would help a lot.

 

Chooks, goats, pigs, coconuts, fruit trees and open pollenated non-hybrid vegetables, maybe even some olives and a few nut trees, sell the surplus and you're close to being self sufficient. Oh yeah, brewing beer from scratch.

 

Jesse, later in the week, when there are less empty Grande bottles on the table, we should start a thread on what and how to grow stuff here.

I don't mean coconuts or rice but specialty foods.

Vine tomatoes for instance. Courgettes. Salad lettuce. Radish.

Maybe the locals couldn't afford them but chefs would snap them up.

 

K on C

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Jess Bartone

Jesse, later in the week, when there are less empty Grande bottles on the table, we should start a thread on what and how to grow stuff here.

I don't mean coconuts or rice but specialty foods.

Vine tomatoes for instance. Courgettes. Salad lettuce. Radish.

Maybe the locals couldn't afford them but chefs would snap them up.

 

K on C

 

Great idea Kenny. Remember Landline on ABC? There was an article about hydroponic vine tomatoes grown in a controlled environment to protect from insects etc. If using the correct nutrients in the water, tomatoes (and any vegies) are more nutritionally complete, and actually have been shown to taste better when "blind tastings" were conducted, using chefs and food critics as the guinea pigs. In Melbourne, tomato plants grown this way produce fruit up to 10 months in the year, and I'm guessing they could become virtually perennial in the tropics. They are the product preferred by restaurants.

 

(Tomatoes are especially rich in Lycopene, which protects the prostate gland, and in the research conducted in the W.A. university, they found that by eating a diet high in cooked tomatoes and sauces, prostate enlargement is actually reversed.)

 

Another recent breakthrough is growing fish and vegetables in the same system. The fish eat the food you supply them, they shit of course, the water circulates through the vegetable trays where the poop and excess food are taken up by the vegies, and clean water returns to the fish. It's the next big thing, has huge potential, but the next question is, are there any fresh water fish, at least plate size, in the Philippines?

 

 

Clear away the empty Grandes ol'mate, we'll take this up when you're ready.

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