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If anybody has any ideas on other things the specifications should contain, let me know. I am still developing the list and I'm sure it will continue to evolve until I give the plans to an architect. I built a house before back in the States, so I know that unless it is specified, there is no chance that it will happen. Even specifying something is no guarantee that it will happen, but there is more chance (you still have to oversee construction and check everything). And...if the contractor signs a contract that includes your specifications, then at least you have something to hold them to.

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fanboat

I guess what you want the contractor to do is BILTFP.....I see a lot of wiggle room here

 

 

get some insurance for the workers

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smokey

If anybody has any ideas on other things the specifications should contain, let me know. I am still developing the list and I'm sure it will continue to evolve until I give the plans to an architect. I built a house before back in the States, so I know that unless it is specified, there is no chance that it will happen. Even specifying something is no guarantee that it will happen, but there is more chance (you still have to oversee construction and check everything). And...if the contractor signs a contract that includes your specifications, then at least you have something to hold them to.

 

 

 

 

 

 

well unlike some countries where there is a bond on the building here the best you can do is the job goes south is sue .... hummmmmm sounds like a bigger money loser then building..

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I guess what you want the contractor to do is BILTFP.....I see a lot of wiggle room here

 

 

get some insurance for the workers

Huh? Mind explaining the acronym?

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fanboat

I guess what you want the contractor to do is BILTFP.....I see a lot of wiggle room here

 

 

get some insurance for the workers

Huh? Mind explaining the acronym?

 

 

Trade talk=BUILD IT LIKE THE fecking PLANS

 

 

ps the guy will not understand the plans...this is how he will wiggle away from losing his ass...when he says...sorry did not see that!

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I guess what you want the contractor to do is BILTFP.....I see a lot of wiggle room here

 

 

get some insurance for the workers

Huh? Mind explaining the acronym?

 

 

Trade talk=BUILD IT LIKE THE fecking PLANS

 

 

ps the guy will not understand the plans...this is how he will wiggle away from losing his ass...when he says...sorry did not see that!

Hmmm...well, if I use the same contractor I am using for my project in Talisay City, he might have a hard time using that excuse. His wife is the architect/engineer and will oversee the project.

 

That's a funny acronym. I figured it must be something like that, but couldn't figure it out. I really would appreciate help with cutting down on the wiggle room.

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fanboat

For one thing...is there a 200 volt gfi avail here?

 

I have not seen any newtrals in any power panels here....required to use gfi circuits

 

I just think/when you sit down with the contractor...take a lot of time and spell out every detail.....have him sign each and every line item.

 

I was worried that if a worker gets hurt on your property...you have to take care of him....the contractor will not do this.

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For one thing...is there a 200 volt gfi avail here?

 

I have not seen any newtrals in any power panels here....required to use gfi circuits

 

I just think/when you sit down with the contractor...take a lot of time and spell out every detail.....have him sign each and every line item.

 

I was worried that if a worker gets hurt on your property...you have to take care of him....the contractor will not do this.

I don't know if you have ever read the info on the outlets we use in the States, but all 120 volt outlets have to be rated for at least 240 volts. It is stamped right on the back of the outlets. A GCFI outlet senses a spike in CURRENT, not voltage, so the increased voltage doesn't have any effect.

 

I agree that you have to take the time to go over the plans and specs very carefully with the contractor up front to avoid hassles downstream. I know what happens if you don't. I agree with you on going through things line-by-line with the contractor.

 

On the worker injury thing, that must be why they all use hand tools here (just a joke). I was a shop teacher for a couple of years in an earlier lifetime, so I suppose I could teach them how to safely operate power tools before I let them operate them. It might be easier, though, to just drag the body over to the neighbor's property, and wash away the blood stains on your construction site before the ambulance gets there...hehehe.

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fanboat

I wire homes in the usa....seems the gfi has a white wire on it...as in return...to sense voltage ala interruptus...could be wrong

 

I think you got the plans and building thing down....I want a swimm when it is done!

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I wire homes in the usa....seems the gfi has a white wire on it...as in return...to sense voltage ala interruptus...could be wrong

 

I think you got the plans and building thing down....I want a swimm when it is done!

If you are an electrician, you probably know that the name of the device was changed several years ago from "ground fault interrupter" (GFI) to "ground CURRENT fault interrupter" (GCFI), so there would be less confusion over what the device is sensing. If the line side goes to ground (as in gets dipped in the water), the current will dramatically jump as the source tries to feed the seemingly unquenchable demand. The spike will cause the GCFI to trip. Going to ground does nothing to the line-voltage in the house unless your house is hooked up to a variable-voltage transformer (as in series streetlights). If that is the case, then I would expect a house fire, as the voltage can jump as high as primary line-voltage (which is likely several thousand volts depending on the system used by the local utility).

 

When we get done with the whole project, I'm sure we will have some pool parties.

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SkyMan

If anybody has any ideas on other things the specifications should contain, let me know. I am still developing the list and I'm sure it will continue to evolve until I give the plans to an architect. I built a house before back in the States, so I know that unless it is specified, there is no chance that it will happen. Even specifying something is no guarantee that it will happen, but there is more chance (you still have to oversee construction and check everything). And...if the contractor signs a contract that includes your specifications, then at least you have something to hold them to.

I would add the US standard for outlet placement, within 6ft of any doorway (both sides) and a maximum of every 12ft of wall space thereafter. Also, I would add an RJ-45 internet outlet in each room except bathrooms so you can connect to your network wherever you need it. Run them to wherever you want to do most of your computing which I would imagine is the upper left room on the first floor. I would put them on an accessible conduit so the next great leap in technology doesn't require you to rip out your walls. I would have the TV cables in conduit for the same reason.

 

I would not put ceramic tile around a pool, at least not close. That is asking for a knee/hip injury, broken wrist/arm, or concussion. Use that stuff that is like small pebbles glued together in a concrete like surface. It is cooler on the feet and much less slippery when wet.

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If anybody has any ideas on other things the specifications should contain, let me know. I am still developing the list and I'm sure it will continue to evolve until I give the plans to an architect. I built a house before back in the States, so I know that unless it is specified, there is no chance that it will happen. Even specifying something is no guarantee that it will happen, but there is more chance (you still have to oversee construction and check everything). And...if the contractor signs a contract that includes your specifications, then at least you have something to hold them to.

I would add the US standard for outlet placement, within 6ft of any doorway (both sides) and a maximum of every 12ft of wall space thereafter. Also, I would add an RJ-45 internet outlet in each room except bathrooms so you can connect to your network wherever you need it. Run them to wherever you want to do most of your computing which I would imagine is the upper left room on the first floor. I would put them on an accessible conduit so the next great leap in technology doesn't require you to rip out your walls. I would have the TV cables in conduit for the same reason.

 

I would not put ceramic tile around a pool, at least not close. That is asking for a knee/hip injury, broken wrist/arm, or concussion. Use that stuff that is like small pebbles glued together in a concrete like surface. It is cooler on the feet and much less slippery when wet.

Good idea on the outlets, but I will spell it out and not just leave it to chance that they know US standards. I use a wireless hub, so I can connect into the Internet anyplace on the property. However, it is probably still a good idea to install the RJ-45 cables around the house. Good idea on the cabling conduits as well. The tile I was thinking about around the pool is salteel tile, which is unglazed fired-ceramic tile (like what you see all over Mexico). It doesn't get slippery. Exposed aggregate (which is what you are talking about) hurts my sensitive feet...hahaha. I was down at the Cabana Beach Resort in Moalboal this week, and they have a mixture of Euro-tile and exposed aggregate around the pool. Both were hot enough to be uncomfortable during the day.

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chimellie

Wow...Nice place, good luck with the project.

 

How about putting the master suite on the first floor. Your knees are good now, but how about in 10 or 15 years if you can't walk the stairs ?

 

Good luck in building your place.

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Wow...Nice place, good luck with the project.

 

How about putting the master suite on the first floor. Your knees are good now, but how about in 10 or 15 years if you can't walk the stairs ?

 

Good luck in building your place.

I thought about that, but then I decided that if I need to, I can just install a simple elevator on the side of the garage to go up to the balcony. Then, I can go into the master suite through the sliding glass door. I don't ever want to be in a situation where I can't get to part of my house. The second floor will be cooler because of the breezes, and I want to be able to take advantage of the big covered balcony upstairs overlooking the pool. My dad is 85 and still strong as an ox. I'm sure he will live another twenty years. The last six generations of men in my paternal line have lived to an average age of 94, so I see no reason why I can't live to 104 or so unless I get run over by a Jeepney. Then I can die in bed with a smile on my face.

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SkyMan

 

Good idea on the outlets, but I will spell it out and not just leave it to chance that they know US standards. I use a wireless hub, so I can connect into the Internet anyplace on the property. However, it is probably still a good idea to install the RJ-45 cables around the house. Good idea on the cabling conduits as well. The tile I was thinking about around the pool is salteel tile, which is unglazed fired-ceramic tile (like what you see all over Mexico). It doesn't get slippery. Exposed aggregate (which is what you are talking about) hurts my sensitive feet...hahaha. I was down at the Cabana Beach Resort in Moalboal this week, and they have a mixture of Euro-tile and exposed aggregate around the pool. Both were hot enough to be uncomfortable during the day.

Yes, I would still do the RJ-45. Some wireless routers have difficulty getting signal around/trough concrete and the cables are, at least now, faster.

 

Exposed aggregate, I'll have to remember that. I've seen it in teh rougher form which is fine but I've also seen where the aggregate seems smoother though that may be from years of use. And i have seen the smoother variety where they have coated it with some sort of shiny finish that makes it always look wet. One pool I really like had that sort of shiny smooth exposed aggregate around it and before reaching the water edge it sloped down to about 4-5 inches below water level and leveled again. After another 2 feet, the aggregate stopped and the dropped into the pool. I really enjoyed sun bathing by laying in that shallow water on the edge. Even though I was laying on the aggregate, it felt good. Of course, a few years ago I was ordered to lay face down on a gravel road to pretend I was dead, and I feel asleep.

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