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Mineral water in the Phils


Are you not sick of artificially purified water?  

8 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you drink mineral water in the RP?

    • yes
      0
    • no
    • I would if a good one was available
  2. 2. Do you like distilled (purified or whatever) water?

    • yes, no other choice
    • yes, I love the taste of distilled water
    • it tastes horrible but thats the only available choice
    • no I hate it, so I buy sodas most of the time
  3. 3. Do you drink carbonated (sparkling) water?

    • yes, I love it, tastes better than normal water
    • yes, sometimes
      0
    • no, difficult to get
    • no, I am almost a Filipino, never touch carbonated, unless its beer or coke
    • I don't like, tastes horrible
    • I don't like burping
  4. 4. If you buy bottled mineral water, your preferred brand is....

    • Perrier
    • Evian
      0
    • other from abroad
    • other made in the Phils (please post brand, but only mineral water brand)
  5. 5. I think in the Philippines there is...

    • ...a market for quality mineral water at affordable price
    • ...a market for quality and pricier mineral water
      0
    • ...no need for mineral water, even people driving SUVs are fine with boiled or purified water
    • ...no need for bottled mineral water at all


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To run a business in the Philippines, you first need to look at the Foreign Ownership Negative list.

That shows the businesses that you either cannot run, or that have to have majority Filipino ownership, or else have a legal requirement for high initial investment.

 

(You could run a business not proscribed, or put it in someone elses name, many do, but it is a risk.)

 

The easiest, to comply with all the laws, is either buying goods made in the Philippines and exporting them, or setting up and manufacturing in the Philippines, again for export.

 

Hi Alan, thank you for this, I have been searching the forums for this info, now at least I know the name of the regulation. Perhaps a thread discussing the Foreign Ownership Negative list would be useful for many. I could not find such so far.

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Top Posters In This Topic

  • digiteye

    28

  • Jess Bartone

    7

  • lazydays

    7

  • Headshot

    6

Digiteye;

 

Why not come to Cebu, test market your water and see how you do? The guys have given your their point of views, but if you feel that confident about your product ( And you should feel that way), then come on over and give it a try. I would not recommend that you invest alot. But again a small sample and see what type of reaction you get. Remember the founder of Fedex was given a 'C' in his economics class for his idea that turned out to be Fedex.

 

Hi Cary, thanks for the suggestion. I am afraid sampling water would be very costly (the weight / value ratio is not too favorable for transporting samples).

Hehe, yes the story behind FedEx is quite cool, the company today is less. More like FedUp. At least in my place, maybe the Phils is different.

 

The water idea came from my trip in Cebu in January, when I realized there is nothing much of mineral waters around, while in SE Asia it is coming up in other countries. Even sparkling waters which once were equal to poison for Asians. Funny thing is I tested sparkling water on my Asian friends and with no exception they hated it in the beginning. Since I like it, I have no other water at home so they had to drink it as no other choice. First with fruit syrups. Then plain. Now I have them addicted to it and they drink only sparkling. Its only 3 of them and not Pinoys, but looking for sparkling water even in restaurants now.

I don't want to draw conclusion from 3 cases, that's why I am testing my idea here.

 

As for transport, it seems favorable. There is a huge traffic of shipped goods from China to Europe, while most of the carriers return back to China half empty, giving the opportunity to ship at low cost towards East.

 

If I could make only 1 peso per a big bottle and sell 100,000 of them a month, it would be more than enough, looking at the figures posted about cost of living. I am not greedy, just want to enjoy this heaven (bit earlier than others, if you get what I mean...) For that the product shall not compete with the big players directly, maybe enough if available only in Cebu and Cagayan de Oro. You have to consume 3 liters of liquid as a minimum in a climate like the Phils. Let's say a regular customer takes 1 liter a day, so 30 a month. I need about 3300 regular customers a month. Or 1700 families of two. Is that really a lot? I don't know. From this forum it seems it is :ROFLMAO:

 

Anyway, I am looking at other options now.

 

have a nice day

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Nursing home for expats? Not kidding.

 

Willie, please talk to me. PM me as I cannot do it yet for having lower message count. thx, its a very interesting idea, I would love to discuss.

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Me again Digiteye.

 

I have noticed that you have at times just barely managed to stay within what might be called acceptable manners, and your frustration has been almost palpable. Thankfully I was able to give you a good laugh with my "30%" thing, you having repeated it several times.

 

It was something I read a few years ago, and the "one third" line stuck in my head, I feel so embarrassed that in truth it was actually just 1 third of 1% (for the US alone, and 1% worldwide). My apologies for being such a forgetful numbskull. Here is something I found just now, plus a few more links which may or may not make you realise the bottled water industry is a top heavy cash cow which may be in for a few shocks in the near future.

 

"Given an annual consumption of 33 billion liters of bottled water in the US, we estimate that the annual consumption of bottled water in the US in 2007 required an energy input equivalent to between 32 and 54 million barrels of oil or a third of a per cent of total US primary energy consumption. We estimate that roughly three times this amount was required to satisfy global bottled water demand."

 

Source

 

I am not against capitalism and consumerism as such, just the way the billionaire industry captains use fear and coercion to convince people that a certain products are "safer" than cheaper products readily available, for example, tap water. I believe your plan to sell high-end bottled water in the Philippines is dead in the water, but what would I know? I'm just a shit-kickin' construction worker.

 

Bottled Water is Wasteful

 

The facts about bottled water

 

I'm no greenie, far from it, but why waste all this lovely oil making plastic bottles when we could be saving it for our cars? However, I have no control of what goes on in the world, I just roll with the punches, so by all means, go for it. Anyway, it seems you realise your chances are limited, so the lesson is: if you join a public forum, and ask questions of the 3,000-odd members, expect that some of them will react negatively, especially those that have been there (in Cebu) for a while, and know the ins-and-outs of how business is done there. Others, like myself, who know nothing about business, will have ethical concerns, and it is right that they are thrown into the discussion.

 

It also occurred to me that if your product is so good, why don't you attack the existing 1st world market, where stupid fools are willing to pay 6, 7, 8 dollars for 300ml of water?twocents.gif

 

 

Hey, sorry.... don't take it too hard.

 

 

Thanks for the sources, interesting articles. However looking at the responses here and assuming most of the members are North American, interestingly there is no issue about the sodas, coke is good, it seems it has no effect on the environment and the PET coke bottles don't count in the littering in the articles you quoted.

Its all against bottled waters only... surprising.

 

If you enter a supermarket, there is AT LEAST the same amount of bottled sodas piled up as bottled waters. And their turnover is higher. Yet, there is no mention of sodas in your articles (and others). Why? I don't know. But this is when it becomes suspicious.

 

Soda industry is pretty old and stagnating while mineral waters are relatively young and growing (taking market share from sodas). If you were one of the folks sitting at the board of Coca Cola, what would you do apart from small mistakes of introducing "new taste" in every other century (for failure) ? You would sponsor anything against Pepsi and mineral waters. Well, its not exactly true, because Coca Cola also have bottled waters. But i people's mind they are not associated with waters and their water business is minor to sodas.

 

Re your last question. If I was to plan living in any 1st world country I would join forums there and ask there. But that's not what I am after. Looking for something to live on in the Phils...just like the others here :ROFLMAO:

 

have a nice sunny day!

Edited by digiteye
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I think I have found what Jesse was referring to. It is nothing about mineral water, but some other - and its shocking.

 

Also take a few minutes to read the entire article if you love people in the Phils just a tiny bit to see what is happening to those who go to Dubai hoping for better life and future... very sad indeed.

Sorry for the off topic. (well.. I am the thread starter...)

 

 

(In Dubai) "There is no surface water, very little acquifer, and among the lowest rainfall in the world. So Dubai drinks the sea. The Emirates' water is stripped of salt in vast desalination plants around the Gulf

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If you have a deep well here on Cebu, you are getting all the minerals you need. What is called mineral water in most parts of the world is just water from limestone aquifers. It is also called "sweet water" in some places. Limestone is what most of Cebu is made of, since the island is basically just sea floor thrust up out of the ocean by the big faults running along each side of it. The water they sell here on every street corner as mineral water is well water that has been filtered, but not de-mineralized. It IS mineral water. I seriously doubt there is much of a niche market here for what some call "quality" mineral water. Most people would just think it was outragiously overpriced. I can buy the big (what is it...10 liters?) water bottles for my water dispenser for 25p. Why in the world would I pay more?

 

 

That is GREAT info about the water.

Since purified water basically has everything removed, it good to know that the water you buy there still has the minerals.

I never cease to be amazed at the info that gets served up on here.

 

Hahahah, this is a good one. Yes, you are right - there is NO MINERALS left in the water after processing, basically its same as distilled water which therefore useful in the cooler system of cars (no issues of mineral deposits) or you can use for steam ironing (the tiny holes wont get stuck by limestone). Also suitable for drinking (as in not poisonous), but it tastes what it is: distilled water.

 

I also just noticed a flaw in the logic: if there is a deep well that supplies "mineral water" as Jesse said, they why on Earth he has to buy the filtered one for 25 pesos? :)

 

So yeah, there are some pieces of great info here (also the 30% CO2 pollution due to mineral water distribution...) one only should practice caution what to believe and what not.

I'm not sure what your understanding of bottled water on Cebu is, but as it was explained to me by the bottled water people, they have two types of bottled water here: purified and distilled. You can buy either from the plant. The bottled water that I get delivered to my apartment (because my Filipina wife doesn't trust well water and it is easier to just buy some water than to argue the point), IS "sweet" water, which means it has a good load of minerals in it. I really DO know the difference in taste between mineral water and distilled water.

 

When I build my home in Danao, I will have a deep well drilled, so I know exactly how deep it is and so I can have the water tested. For now, I just have to take the landlady's word that the well is deep. I know that it is loaded with minerals, but I know nothing about the aquifer it is from. If you let the water in my house (either bottled or well) stand on your glasses without wiping them dry, you will get water spotting. If you leave water in a glass long enough for it to start evaporating, you will get lime rings. I have experienced these things from both types of water. What does that tell you?

 

I thought you were asking for input on a decision on whether or not to import "quality" mineral water to the Philippines. However, rather than thanking the guys who did give input, you just defended your original position. Since that is the case, I have to conclude that you already made up your mind to go ahead with your venture and are either looking for some validation here or doing a bit of free advertising. That's fine. I wish you luck with your venture.

 

By the way, I am NOT Jesse.

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If you have a deep well here on Cebu, you are getting all the minerals you need. What is called mineral water in most parts of the world is just water from limestone aquifers. It is also called "sweet water" in some places. Limestone is what most of Cebu is made of, since the island is basically just sea floor thrust up out of the ocean by the big faults running along each side of it. The water they sell here on every street corner as mineral water is well water that has been filtered, but not de-mineralized. It IS mineral water. I seriously doubt there is much of a niche market here for what some call "quality" mineral water. Most people would just think it was outragiously overpriced. I can buy the big (what is it...10 liters?) water bottles for my water dispenser for 25p. Why in the world would I pay more?

 

 

That is GREAT info about the water.

Since purified water basically has everything removed, it good to know that the water you buy there still has the minerals.

I never cease to be amazed at the info that gets served up on here.

 

Hahahah, this is a good one. Yes, you are right - there is NO MINERALS left in the water after processing, basically its same as distilled water which therefore useful in the cooler system of cars (no issues of mineral deposits) or you can use for steam ironing (the tiny holes wont get stuck by limestone). Also suitable for drinking (as in not poisonous), but it tastes what it is: distilled water.

 

I also just noticed a flaw in the logic: if there is a deep well that supplies "mineral water" as Jesse said, they why on Earth he has to buy the filtered one for 25 pesos? :)

 

So yeah, there are some pieces of great info here (also the 30% CO2 pollution due to mineral water distribution...) one only should practice caution what to believe and what not.

I'm not sure what your understanding of bottled water on Cebu is, but as it was explained to me by the bottled water people, they have two types of bottled water here: purified and distilled. You can buy either from the plant. The bottled water that I get delivered to my apartment (because my Filipina wife doesn't trust well water and it is easier to just buy some water than to argue the point), IS "sweet" water, which means it has a good load of minerals in it. I really DO know the difference in taste between mineral water and distilled water.

 

When I build my home in Danao, I will have a deep well drilled, so I know exactly how deep it is and so I can have the water tested. For now, I just have to take the landlady's word that the well is deep. I know that it is loaded with minerals, but I know nothing about the aquifer it is from. If you let the water in my house (either bottled or well) stand on your glasses without wiping them dry, you will get water spotting. If you leave water in a glass long enough for it to start evaporating, you will get lime rings. I have experienced these things from both types of water. What does that tell you?

 

I thought you were asking for input on a decision on whether or not to import "quality" mineral water to the Philippines. However, rather than thanking the guys who did give input, you just defended your original position. Since that is the case, I have to conclude that you already made up your mind to go ahead with your venture and are either looking for some validation here or doing a bit of free advertising. That's fine. I wish you luck with your venture.

 

By the way, I am NOT Jesse.

 

Hi there,

 

sorry I messed up which message came from which member - that's why addressed you as Jesse. Apologies to both of you.

 

As for being thankful, please look back in the thread, I have used the "thank" button quite a few times. And thanked members if their input was helpful. So I think this part is clear.

 

I don't want to bore people with official definitions of mineral water and the definition may differ by country. If your well is 10-20 meter deep (below 100) chances are you don't have mineral water from that - and it also depends on the geological situation. If the water plant that sells water for you has to "purify" the water, it must be at least mixed with surface waters so no one on Earth (apart from the owner) can tell what sort of water is that.

 

The limescale deposits indicate there is Ca in the water - but that alone is not enough to make that water mineral water, its just a hard water, which is well-known phenomenon in countries with limestone mountain areas. These waters may come to the surface, mix with anything there and still contain Ca - yet it does not match the criteria of mineral water and not at all pure.

But if you find the cave above where the water is originated before reaching the surface and drill inside that water cave, then you have the chance to get mineral water - and it will be naturally pure, no need to "purify".

 

Summary: in household wells the water may contain certain minerals (and anything else) - that alone wont qualify the water as mineral water. Wells 200-300 meter deep can give you mineral water, which only has to be processed if the iron content is high (for the bad taste of iron).

And the funny thing is, the higher the Na (salt) content of the water, the better it tastes. The amount is much less than making the water taste salty.

The amount of Na in this case is not comparable to what one consumes with food, therefore this small Na content has no effect on health (e.g. no higher risk of high blood pressure).

 

I am not advertising here anything and its pretty clear that no one wants to buy mineral water. But at least I reached the message count that allows me to do more things in the forum. :lol:

 

have a nice evening!

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I gew up drinking sparkling water as there was no other choice, .. and I hated it. Even Perier has too much of sparkles for me now, my wife wouldn't touch it with a pair of pliers. I prefer drinking juices here as real juice of all sorts is so cheap here, and SML/SMP. No customer here. Don't see a market for it either other than high end restaurants.

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RogerDuMond

Thanks for the sources, interesting articles. However looking at the responses here and assuming most of the members are North American, interestingly there is no issue about the sodas, coke is good, it seems it has no effect on the environment and the PET coke bottles don't count in the littering in the articles you quoted.

I can't speak to the city, but the majority of coke consumed in our area of the province is still in returnable glass bottles while much of the bottled water is in smaller PET bottles.

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Jess Bartone

.....

 

By the way, I am NOT Jesse.

 

Thank God for that.

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lazydays

To get back to the original topic, I never drink mineral / bottled water.

(I also rarely drink cola's or similar soft drinks.)

 

I would think that the market for a "premium" water would be minimal in the Philippines, and would also require a substantial spend on marketing to launch it.

 

I would also think that, as soon as you were sucessful (if you were) the big boys would muscle in take over. (By fair means or foul.)

 

Overall, I doubt it would work.

 

But, I could easily be wrong.

Perrier is owned by Nestle and Evian is owned by Dannon (Danone Groupe) so both waters are part of a product group imported with other products from the manufacturers and aren't stand alone products. They are here for a niche and sales or lack there of in the Philippines will not negatively effect the parent companies.

 

Thanks Roger, in fact my idea was to find a local distributor or wholesaler to make a deal with, I would not jump into wholesale. Actually the price is quite good compared to what Perrier has or Evian (I still have to assess the transportation costs further), but by now I am convinced this wont be the best business there.

 

I can't help it, I must refer to the old anecdote of every other business conference about the pessimistic and optimistic Italian shoe sales agents sent to Libya.

 

After a week they reporting back to the headquarters.

 

Pessimistic: bloody sand everywhere, nobody wearing shoes, no business. Let me go home.

 

Optimistic: hot sand everywhere, nobody wearing shoes! Start the first batch, I stay until it arrives.

 

Am I being optimistic? Maybe.

 

 

So... please lets put this mineral water topic to rest.

 

Any update on internet cafe, sari-sari? Japanese fried thingy stall franchise? cooking.gif Or shall I open a boarding house? any-help.gif

 

Or what else? I want to be there....phil.gif

 

Nursing home for expats? Not kidding.

 

 

Actually,thats a damn good idea for those interested.

The Philippines produces some of the best nurses and carers in the World.

There are many thousands of nurses and carers graduating every year,so no shortage of staff.

My Mum was looked after by filipino/a nurses in the UK,when she had a stroke,she thinks they are marvelous for the care and attention they give.

Edited by lazydays
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