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samatm

NPA - contact

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smidsy

Just to mention, I crossed through the centre of Samar, from Catbalogan to Taft(small town). No problems at all, and the most beautiful scenery iv seen in Philippines.

 

Also, I took the eastern road while going south through Leyte, this again is through rugid mountains, and also extremely beautiful scenery.

 

This was our route...

 

16341_1311809074781_1217266976_1392168_4473536_n.jpg

 

Keep in mind, I was in a "risky" car, its a Ford Everest, which is only 2 years old, so if they were going to pick on a rich guy, I would have been him.

 

Also, the only time I got a little nervious, was travelling from Ormoc after visiting the lake(high in the mountains), and heading to Naval. We timed it badly and spent too much tima at the lake, and were driving up in the tips of the mountains in the pitch dark, trying to get to Naval. I had no problems at all, but I understand why people say dont travel in the mountains at night. You just feel too vulnerable, like you get an uncomfortable feeling. Might have been just me.

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samatm

Thanks Smidsy. for the updated.. I didn't cross Samar but went up to Borongan and return through Tac and Ormoc. You are correct ...beautiful country in Samar, leyte. I never had a worry either..even when leaving Lake Danao late at night heading back into Ormoc.

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smidsy

Did you stay in Pirates Cove in Borongan ??

 

Over priced place if you ask me.

 

Also, it pissed me off that you cant swim in the Pacific, loads of weird purple stinging Jelly fish type things. Even the locals dont swim there

 

These things(apparently 2 hours of lots of pain !)...

 

16341_1312429690296_1217266976_1394425_5147506_n.jpg

 

and some of these

 

16341_1312429610294_1217266976_1394423_4650560_n.jpg

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RogerDuMond

Did you stay in Pirates Cove in Borongan ??

 

Over priced place if you ask me.

 

Also, it pissed me off that you cant swim in the Pacific, loads of weird purple stinging Jelly fish type things. Even the locals dont swim there

 

These things(apparently 2 hours of lots of pain !)...

 

16341_1312429690296_1217266976_1394425_5147506_n.jpg

 

These are called Portuguese man o' war. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_Man_o%27_War

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samatm

Did you stay in Pirates Cove in Borongan ??

 

Over priced place if you ask me.

 

Also, it pissed me off that you cant swim in the Pacific, loads of weird purple stinging Jelly fish type things. Even the locals dont swim there

 

These things(apparently 2 hours of lots of pain !)...

 

16341_1312429690296_1217266976_1394425_5147506_n.jpg

 

These are called Portuguese man o' war. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_Man_o%27_War

 

LOL... we stayed with friends in Balankayan. to the South and went swimming everyday without an PMW Jellyfish encounter. The surf was fantastic... Also found a very very cool wall dive i have vowed to return to with gear. I only had mask and snorkel.

Later We went to Divanudo (sp) Island and camped over there... on the beach. very nice.

 

 

 

pls start another thread about Pirates Cove.. I was interested in finding out more about that place

Edited by samatm

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SkyMan

You also have to realize that regardless of what you think of the NPA, there are plenty of bandits in these same areas that operate under the geise of NPA but are really on their own.

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Willie

Wikipedia, 2/5/10

 

Formation

The NPA's roots can be traced from the Hukbalahap, the armed wing of the earlier pro-Soviet Philippine Communist Party. The Huks first mobilized and fought against the Japanese Empire's occupation of the Philippines during World War II. Under the leadership of Luis Taruc and Communist Party General Secretary Jose Lava, the Hukbalahap continued waging guerrilla warfare against the United States and the first independent governments before largely surrendering to President Ramon Magsaysay in 1954. By the early 1960s the communist Huk campaign was waning.

 

After the Sino-Soviet split, communist parties around the world fractured into pro-USSR and Maoist groups. The upstart CPP broke from the older Soviet-line Partido Komunista ng Pilipinas-1930 on December 26, 1968. Three months later, on March 29, 1969, the CPP reformed the vanguard party's old militia, the Huks, and renamed them the New People's Army, on the anniversary of the date that the guerrilla resistance against Imperial Japan was formed in 1942. The formation was created when José María Sison met with a former Huk, Bernabe Buscayno, also known as "Commander Dante".

 

The NPA follows Maoism, claiming to fight for that ideology's concept of "New Democracy." Starting out with 60 fighters and 34 rifles, the NPA quickly spread throughout the Philippines during the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos. After the declaration of martial law on September 21, 1972 thousands of students joined the ranks. President Marcos lifted martial law on January 17, 1981.

 

At its peak in the early 1980s there were over 25,000 fighters. Current strength is estimated at 8,000.

 

 

The NPA has been classified as a terrorist organization by the United States[3]

 

 

Second Great Rectification Movement

In the 1990s internal criticism about mistakes in the 1980s led to the Second Great Rectification Movement, launched in 1992 and largely completed in 1998, leading to a resurgence in the Philippine revolution. The Second Rectification ended a massive internal purge of the movement that killed thousands of partisans and members on accusations of being deep penetration agents of the Armed Forces of the Philippines and the Philippine intelligence community. Former NPA fighter Robert Francis Garcia chronicled the wild murders in his book To Suffer Thy Comrades and organized the Peace Advocates for Truth, Healing and Justice (PATH), a group composed of survivors of the "purges" and the families of victims and their friends and supporters. Due to this 'Rectification Movement', NPA rebels have been reported to have apologized to affected communities and even offered compensation for the victims of the purges.[citation needed]

 

The NPA claims responsibility for the assassination of U.S. Army Colonel James "Nick" Rowe, founder of the U.S. Army Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) course, in 1989. Colonel Rowe was part of a military assistance program to the Philippine Army. The NPA insist that this made him a legitimate military target.[citation needed]

 

 

Post 9/11

This group was designated as a foreign terrorist organisation by the United States in August 2002 and by the European Union in November 2005.[3][2] The NPA's founder, Jose Maria Sison, lives in the Netherlands in self-imposed exile. The NPA operates mostly in the rural areas and their targets often include politicians, military, police, criminals, landlords, business owners and occasionally U.S. agents in the Philippines.

 

In 1995 the CPP issued a communique approving of same-sex relationships and in 2005 the first gay marriage of two NPA cadre was performed.[4]

 

The Arroyo administration has been negotiating intermittently with delegates of NPA in European countries.

 

In March 2007 Rep. Satur Ocampo was arrested on charges of murder relating to purges within the CPP/NPA alleged to have occurred during the 1980s.[5] Leftists see it as part of a campaign of persecution against them.[citation needed]

 

On January, 2008, Avelino Razon, Philippine National Police chief stated that the New People's Army (NPA) rebels have only 5,700 members as of 2007 due to military destruction of 13 guerrilla bases (lowest level in 20 years). NPAs fought in 69 of 81 Philippine provinces since 1969. Forty thousand people have died in the conflict. [6]

 

 

Amnesty Proclamation

On September 5, 2007, President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo signed Amnesty Proclamation 1377 for members of the Communist Party of the Philippines and its armed wing, the New People's Army; other communist rebel groups; and their umbrella organization, the National Democratic Front. The amnesty will cover the crime of rebellion and all other crimes "in pursuit of political beliefs," but not including crimes against chastity, rape, torture, kidnapping for ransom, use and trafficking of illegal drugs and other crimes for personal ends and violations of international law or convention and protocols "even if alleged to have been committed in pursuit of political beliefs." The National Committee on Social Integration (NCSI) will issue a Certificate of Amnesty to qualified applicants. Implementing rules and regulations are being drafted and the decree will be submitted to the Senate of the Philippines and the House of Representatives of the Philippines for their concurrence. The proclamation becomes effective only after Congress has concurred.[7]

 

 

Lucena Prison Raid

NPA rebels disguised as Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency personnel had raided a prison in Lucena, Quezon Province[8][9], overpowering the guards and freeing their comrades deemed to be political prisoners.[10] Two of the seven people deemed political prisoners did not escape with the NPA raiders, opting to be cleared of any wrongdoing by legal means as they were activists.[11]

 

Other NPA rebels held in other prisons were to be moved into secured facilities.[12]

Edited by Slick Willie

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