Jump to content

Planning to Visit the US?


Recommended Posts

The new requirement has nothing to do with American citizens. As long as you are a law abiding USC you can come and go as you wish. It is nothing more then a way to track other countries citizens entering under the Visa waiver program. It about as painless as filling out your customs declaration form upon entering another country. With the world going to hell in a hand basket you will see most countries implementing additional entry requirements in the future. Its just the times we are living in.

 

I personally think our Visa requirements are totally out of line when it comes to an American citizen married to a foreign spouse. A spouse of a US citizen should be able to enter with her or his spouse for visits and or immigration without having to spend in excess of a thousand dollars and jump through hoops for 6 plus months. Yet certain people living south of our border seem to sneak in and stay for a lifetime. There is truly something wrong with that picture. Will it change, can it be fixed? I doubt it. It will probably only get worse.

 

Canada and US border........thats an easy one. The Detroit River. I used to fish several tournaments a year there. Its always amazed me how easy it was and would be for illegals to cross there. Several hundred Bass Boats launching there for a 2 or 3 day tournament. Blast off and run 60 plus mph and your in Canada in a matter of minutes. Pull up to a public or private dock, tie up have a drink, pick up your illegal friend, fish a few hours, load up your boat and drive home. Couldn't be anymore simple. Very few immigration or border patrol officers manning the parks where the launch ramps are. You would really have to be drawing attention to yourself to get stopped or checked there. :itsokay:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 41
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Markham

    4

  • Ungaro

    3

  • Jess Bartone

    3

  • tom_shor

    3

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

It would be easier to drop the "Visa Waiver Scheme" and make people from those countries apply for a regular visa. They do everything the hard way and want to create even more bureaucracy. Sooner than

I for one feel so much safer. Those guys are really on the ball. People complain about millions of illegals so they respond by making it more difficult for legal access and then say how much safer an

If you are a US citizen married to a pinay and apply for a B1/B2 (tourist, non-immigrant) visa for her, fuggedaboudit.   My wife was summarily denied a B1/B2 visa on Monday (July 18, 2011) simply be

smokey

If you are a US citizen married to a pinay and apply for a B1/B2 (tourist, non-immigrant) visa for her, fuggedaboudit.

 

My wife was summarily denied a B1/B2 visa on Monday (July 18, 2011) simply because she is married to a US citizen. They don't and will not get it that we do not want to live in the US. The officer (Bradshaw) in Manila told my wife that she had to apply for a spousal visa. She explained that she does not want to immigrate, does not want to live in the US, has all her family and property here in the RP. It does not matter.

 

One of the first questions on the spousal visa application is "Where do you intend to reside in the US?" If you answer "Nowhere, we live in the RP", they will tell you to apply for a B1/B2 visa, which will be denied because you are a "presumed immigrant". They will not give my wife a B1/B2 visa because she cannot be deported (as a spouse of a US citizen).

 

You cannot make this stuff up, only a government mired in its own bureaucracy and idiocy can...

 

 

 

 

 

 

well i did read that there are over 350,000 overstaying people from the philippines.... guess after getting bullshitted by the last frew hundred thousand they become deaf to the truth

Link to post
Share on other sites

I visit the US quite a lot, on a B1/B2 visa, and have absolutely no problems. It's a great country with so many different places to visit. There is a lot of hype created, but I think it's actually easier going into the US then it is coming into Manila, or in fact entering the UK or Schengen countries.

 

Oh yeah??? Last month my wife and I traveled to Europe, in four Schengen countries. She got her tourist visa at the Belgian Embassy in Manila without any problems -- even though I am a citizen of one of the Schengen countries... The counsular officer just asked, "How come you are not applying for a spousal visa?" to which I replied "Because we do not wish to live there, only visit." He said, "Oh." and approved the visa application.

 

I am also a US citizen and because of this, her B1/B2 US visa was summarily denied.

Edited by Ungaro
Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh yeah??? Last month my wife and I traveled to Europe, in four Schengen countries. She got her tourist visa at the Belgian Embassy in Manila without any problems -- even though I am a citizen of one of the Schengen countries... The counsular officer just asked, "How come you are not applying for a spousal visa?" to which I replied "Because we do not wish to live there, only visit." He said, "Oh." and approved the visa application.

 

I am also a US citizen and because of this, her B1/B2 US visa was summarily denied.

 

Whilst I respect that there is a unique situation for US citizens and a B1/B2 visas for their spouses. In general the US Visa process for a B1/B2 for business and tourism of foreign nationals is very straightforward. I've done hundreds of applications for B1/B2, British Visit and Schengen visas over the years for employees and (several times sponsored friends and family for UK visas) and never had one refused, generally because the visa rules are relatively fair. The schengen rules are just a whole lot more backwards then most, because at first glance you would assume that a Belgian Schengen visa would allow you unrestricted travel across the schengen area, unfortunately that isn't quite the case with some so called schengen countries having their own interpretation of the rules.

Normally once the B1/B2 has been obtained for the US, its very easy to come and go into the US, and the border officers have come a long way over the years and mostly polite and professional.

Edited by Ricky
Link to post
Share on other sites

You could come by my place and we could have a beer and BBQ some steaks. Bring your own beer and steaks. :thats-funny:

 

Seriously what do you want to see? somewhere I am sure they got it.

Thanks for the invite I am a fan of American westerns so maybe locations like Monument Valley. I heard American beer is not drinkable, how about I bring a cow along and you can do the butchering. :biggrin_01:

 

Sorry for my late reply I don't remember this thread must have been when I had my brain flushed for toxins. One of the reasons for not wanting to visit the US is because we are so similar to them that they have lost their interest for me. Blame television, a 50 year diet of American culture can do that for you.

 

Just after 9/11 they started turning Australians back and not letting them into the country at LAX some high profile Australians were included it really put me off seeing as how we were part of the "coalition of the willing." The US is low on my list of countries still to visit.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Let me tell you about Canadian Club - I have not had a drink of any kind of Alcohol in over 28 yrs, but I can still tilt my head back and savor the taste of a nice tall CC &Water on my Pallett

 

 

Some 30 years ago I saw a sign along Interstate 5 in California that said "Drink Canada Dry" and I have been trying ever since.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jess Bartone

Just after 9/11 they started turning Australians back and not letting them into the country at LAX some high profile Australians were included it really put me off seeing as how we were part of the "coalition of the willing." The US is low on my list of countries still to visit.

 

American immigration authorities would do well to take note of the above... they may consider 22 million an insignificant number of punters, but Aussies are looking for somewhere safe to spend their vacation and are renowned big spenders. A large percentage of Aussies save madly for a year or more, specifically to blow in a foreign country, might as well be with our closest allies right?... and lately many many people are talking about buying houses in America. Wouldn't they rather this kind of activity from a friendly and supportive nation than from... the alternatives?

Link to post
Share on other sites
RetiredNavyGuy

American immigration authorities would do well to take note of the above... they may consider 22 million an insignificant number of punters, but Aussies are looking for somewhere safe to spend their vacation and are renowned big spenders. A large percentage of Aussies save madly for a year or more, specifically to blow in a foreign country, might as well be with our closest allies right?... and lately many many people are talking about buying houses in America. Wouldn't they rather this kind of activity from a friendly and supportive nation than from... the alternatives?

 

You're assuming the US is still run by rational people who have the best interests of the country at heart...at best, a dubious assumption nowadays.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
A_Simple_Man

American immigration authorities would do well to take note of the above... they may consider 22 million an insignificant number of punters, but Aussies are looking for somewhere safe to spend their vacation and are renowned big spenders. A large percentage of Aussies save madly for a year or more, specifically to blow in a foreign country, might as well be with our closest allies right?... and lately many many people are talking about buying houses in America. Wouldn't they rather this kind of activity from a friendly and supportive nation than from... the alternatives?

 

Aussies are renowned for being non tippers so are not high on the list for most sought after tourists. That honor used to go to the Japanese but I'm not sure at the moment. You would hate the US. Some of the hotels have a 15% tip included in the bill so you can't get away from it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
loosehead

I don't think this change is a big deal. They introduced a self-declaration for aussies in January 2009 to beef up security around the 90 day tourist visa waiver. The aussies that were allegedly turned back may not have completed that requirement although it was widely promoted by the aussie Department. From Markham's post it appears the onus now is on the traveller rather than the travel agent to complete and submit the form. For those of us that don't use travel agents, that was always the case. Please let me know if i'm missing something.

 

Plenty of aussies I know tip. It's not so common in australia where a minimum wage of $16 an hour makes sure the lowest paid workers are not on starvation wage. But when we are overseas, many of us try to understand the local situation and tip accordingly.

Link to post
Share on other sites
loosehead

Thanks for the invite I am a fan of American westerns so maybe locations like Monument Valley. I heard American beer is not drinkable, how about I bring a cow along and you can do the butchering. :as-if:

 

Sorry for my late reply I don't remember this thread must have been when I had my brain flushed for toxins. One of the reasons for not wanting to visit the US is because we are so similar to them that they have lost their interest for me. Blame television, a 50 year diet of American culture can do that for you.

 

Just after 9/11 they started turning Australians back and not letting them into the country at LAX some high profile Australians were included it really put me off seeing as how we were part of the "coalition of the willing." The US is low on my list of countries still to visit.

 

Don't judge the US by what you see on TV or some of the yanks you meet overseas. It really is the most wonderful culturally and geographically diverse country with something for everyone. The people are incredibly friendly and far more hospitable than aussies. We are city people and love the nightlife and live music but we also love the beaches and national parks in small doses. I'm also into american motorcycles and 60s/70s muscle cars so I love the car and bike shows with the beautiful machines, plenty of nice looking girls and the live music. Americans are also an incredibly resilient and optimistic people and i'm sure they will get through this temporary downturn.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jess Bartone

Aussies are renowned for being non tippers so are not high on the list for most sought after tourists.

 

When I said big spenders I did not mean big tippers necessarily. My son and another nine of his snowboarding mates decided to go boarding in a North American winter. When they looked into visas they chose Canada because it (the process) seemed more friendly or just less drama. They each saved $200 a week (blue collar pay cycle in Oz) for a year, plus 4 weeks paid annual leave, so had maybe 15k or so each for a 4 week holiday... and this is just a group of construction tradesmen... imagine the rich buggers... x10=150k less air fares about 2 grand each =130k and that's basically what they left in Vancouver and Whistler. My son is smart he stashed 2 grand but the others pretty much came home broke.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

Capture.JPG

I Understand...