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Planning to Visit the US?


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Lee From Cebu

It really hurt the border towns in the states from canada...I lived a 5 minute drive from the US border and after saying we needed a passport lots of people stopped the cross border shopping trips to much hassle to run down for a tank of gas and some smokes...I remember crossing the border 10 + years ago and most times they would not even look at your ID just smile and say welcome ...Now its like they think every one out to smuggle or move there....I was refused entry because my work boots where in the back of my truck...Canada has done the same thing now to keep up with the US because we share the worlds longest undefended border...Its a sad state of affairs when you cant trust your own nieghbors...By the way we canadians fought hard not to have this passport idea for both countrys...Theres so many holes in the border if you want in just walk ..my friend lives 100 feet across on the canadian side and runs across for beer every day to the corner store....Its very funny to watch :oldtimer: He looks like hes a criminal with 48 beers ...hes been caught twice and they just take his beer ....But he could face a long prison sentence...Its stupid besides american beer sucks .... :biggrin_01:

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It would be easier to drop the "Visa Waiver Scheme" and make people from those countries apply for a regular visa. They do everything the hard way and want to create even more bureaucracy. Sooner than

I for one feel so much safer. Those guys are really on the ball. People complain about millions of illegals so they respond by making it more difficult for legal access and then say how much safer an

If you are a US citizen married to a pinay and apply for a B1/B2 (tourist, non-immigrant) visa for her, fuggedaboudit.   My wife was summarily denied a B1/B2 visa on Monday (July 18, 2011) simply be

Its stupid besides american beer sucks .... :oldtimer:

 

Some of us know that you feel differently about American Whiskey.:cry::biggrin_01:

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I am going to disagree with some of the Americans here.

 

I have a lot of friends in the US, and there are lots of places I would like to see there.

Hence I would love to spend more time there, mixing sightseeing with meeting friends.

 

Now, I have no wish to be blown up, so if they did something that really helped security, I would have no objection.

 

 

However, as I see it, this new legislation does nothing to help security, but does discourage me from travelling.

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Lee From Cebu
Its stupid besides american beer sucks .... :oldtimer:

 

Some of us know that you feel differently about American Whiskey.:1frog::biggrin_01:

well if your going to talk real whiskey ie:canadian you cant beat crown royal but i do like that southern mash that makes you grow boobs :cry::biggrin_01:

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If you are a US citizen married to a pinay and apply for a B1/B2 (tourist, non-immigrant) visa for her, fuggedaboudit.

 

My wife was summarily denied a B1/B2 visa on Monday (July 18, 2011) simply because she is married to a US citizen. They don't and will not get it that we do not want to live in the US. The officer (Bradshaw) in Manila told my wife that she had to apply for a spousal visa. She explained that she does not want to immigrate, does not want to live in the US, has all her family and property here in the RP. It does not matter.

 

One of the first questions on the spousal visa application is "Where do you intend to reside in the US?" If you answer "Nowhere, we live in the RP", they will tell you to apply for a B1/B2 visa, which will be denied because you are a "presumed immigrant". They will not give my wife a B1/B2 visa because she cannot be deported (as a spouse of a US citizen).

 

You cannot make this stuff up, only a government mired in its own bureaucracy and idiocy can...

Edited by Ungaro
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Jess Bartone

You could come by my place and we could have a beer and BBQ some steaks. Bring your own beer and steaks. :oldtimer:

 

Seriously what do you want to see? somewhere I am sure they got it.

 

I've been watching Hollywood movies for 50-odd years (and jeez am I tiredtongue.gif) to the point where I start recognising places and cities on a movie I haven't seen before. If I had 2-bob (20c) for every time I've seen a place in a movie and said "I want to go there" I would be a millionaire, but with all that money, I still wouldn't have enough years left in me to visit each place long enough to do it justice, as opposed to the whistle-stop tour. My instinct tells me New York would be the best jump-off point, and spin a bottle from there.

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USMC-Retired

If you are a US citizen married to a pinay and apply for a B1/B2 (tourist, non-immigrant) visa for her, fuggedaboudit.

 

My wife was summarily denied a B1/B2 visa on Monday (July 18, 2011) simply because she is married to a US citizen. They don't and will not get it that we do not want to live in the US. The officer (Bradshaw) in Manila told my wife that she had to apply for a spousal visa. She explained that she does not want to immigrate, does not want to live in the US, has all her family and property here in the RP. It does not matter.

 

One of the first questions on the spousal visa application is "Where do you intend to reside in the US?" If you answer "Nowhere, we live in the RP", they will tell you to apply for a B1/B2 visa, which will be denied because you are a "presumed immigrant". They will not give my wife a B1/B2 visa because she cannot be deported (as a spouse of a US citizen).

 

You cannot make this stuff up, only a government mired in its own bureaucracy and idiocy can...

 

I posted a while back the same information. I wrote my congressman about this. He was polite and responded back. It is not her that really has the problem with the tourist visa it is you. If you your assets exceed hers then it makes it harder to get the visa. Additionally they are less likely to worry about her and her intent to leave. As yours and wanting to make her stay. Silly but so true. There is no way around the spousal visa. However I have the letter so if one day I go and want to visit. Then need another spousal visa I will have that letter saying I had to apply that way. It is an interesting read.

 

Here is the link,

Congress letter

Edited by Norseman
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There are many places in the USA I would like to visit, but I cannot be bothered mainly because of the hassle at the airport on arrival. They really try to make you feel unwelcome, do they get special training to be like that? There are a lot of other countries on my to do list that I will go to first, so I doubt I will get back to the USA unless my nephew gets married.

 

The USA really does not want those tourist dollars to help the balance of payments!

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broden

I've been watching Hollywood movies for 50-odd years (and jeez am I tiredtongue.gif) to the point where I start recognising places and cities on a movie I haven't seen before. If I had 2-bob (20c) for every time I've seen a place in a movie and said "I want to go there" I would be a millionaire, but with all that money, I still wouldn't have enough years left in me to visit each place long enough to do it justice, as opposed to the whistle-stop tour. My instinct tells me New York would be the best jump-off point, and spin a bottle from there.

America has a truly embarrassing abundance of things to do and places to see both man made and natural and they are spread out over a pretty large area

 

your best choice would be to pick the places you really want to visit the things you really want to see and give yourself enough time to do them and yourself some justice and enjoy what you can do rather than worry about all you're missing

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mpt1947

well if your going to talk real whiskey ie:canadian you cant beat crown royal but i do like that southern mash that makes you grow boobs :oldtimer::biggrin_01:

 

Let me tell you about Canadian Club - I have not had a drink of any kind of Alcohol in over 28 yrs, but I can still tilt my head back and savor the taste of a nice tall CC &Water on my Pallett

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mpt1947

Tell me, how hard is it to get a Tourist Visa to Canada?

 

I am thinking of doing that - my wife has friends and family in the US - I am from the US - but we could get a hotel room in say Windsor and have people meet us there -

 

Maybe we could do a US/Canadian Border tour - Vancouver for my West Coast Relatives, Fort Francis for my Minnesota Friends/Relatives, the above mentioned Windsor and perhaps Toronto/Montreal for the East Coast - A thought.....

 

I've been watching Hollywood movies for 50-odd years (and jeez am I tiredtongue.gif) to the point where I start recognising places and cities on a movie I haven't seen before. If I had 2-bob (20c) for every time I've seen a place in a movie and said "I want to go there" I would be a millionaire, but with all that money, I still wouldn't have enough years left in me to visit each place long enough to do it justice, as opposed to the whistle-stop tour. My instinct tells me New York would be the best jump-off point, and spin a bottle from there.

 

Jesse,

 

Chances are that it is all the same place - just a backlot at some Hollywood Studio made up to look like Minneapolis one day, Miami the next

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There are many places in the USA I would like to visit, but I cannot be bothered mainly because of the hassle at the airport on arrival. They really try to make you feel unwelcome, do they get special training to be like that? There are a lot of other countries on my to do list that I will go to first, so I doubt I will get back to the USA unless my nephew gets married.

 

The USA really does not want those tourist dollars to help the balance of payments!

 

I visit the US quite a lot, on a B1/B2 visa, and have absolutely no problems. It's a great country with so many different places to visit. There is a lot of hype created, but I think it's actually easier going into the US then it is coming into Manila, or in fact entering the UK or Schengen countries.

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rfm010

Tell me, how hard is it to get a Tourist Visa to Canada?

 

i saw your post and started to reply about how easy it is but then i read some of the preceding posts and now maybe i think i shouldn't be quite so optimistic.

 

however.

 

being from near detroit i have had the occasion to take my wife into canada on several of our trips home. the procedure we have always used is to go to the canadian consulate in downtown detroit, get a single entry visa, and head across the border the same day. never any problems.

 

caveat: she hasn't been to canada for 5 years now. who knows what may have changed? i suspect not much at all though.

 

understand though that my wife has been occasionally crossing the border with me since we met in the mid-80s. she has held a multiple entry tourist visa to the u.s. since the early 90's after surrendering her u.s. permanent residency when we moved back here. in other words, she has a history that i'm sure immigration officials take into account.

 

that being said there is always a bit of a line at the consulate and many of the people are asian, several filipino. the general impression i get is that people typically get their visa applications accepted. perhaps already having the u.s. visa helps them.

 

i will leave my response at that for now. the little one needs help with homework.

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SkyMan

I for one feel so much safer. :biggrin_01: Those guys are really on the ball. People complain about millions of illegals so they respond by making it more difficult for legal access and then say how much safer and more secure we are. Aren't they doing a wonderful job. :rofl: Here's where they are going to be checking you next. :oldtimer:

That's the friggin rub isn't it? We'll tromp all over ourselves to insure this Brit, or Aussie, or Jap can't get in without jumping through 10 billion hoops but building a damn cement wall along out southern border is friggin impossible. I won 't ask who's running that country, I'll ask IS ANYONE RUNNING THAT COUNTRY? Other than into the ground at high speed of course.

 

Now, as for this new annoyance that I'm sure will cost the taxpayers plenty and the travelers too. Does this apply to me when I go back in September? And also my wife who already has a B2 tourist visa and may go with me?

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tom_shor

I am going to disagree with some of the Americans here.

 

I have a lot of friends in the US, and there are lots of places I would like to see there.

Hence I would love to spend more time there, mixing sightseeing with meeting friends.

 

Now, I have no wish to be blown up, so if they did something that really helped security, I would have no objection.

 

 

However, as I see it, this new legislation does nothing to help security, but does discourage me from travelling.

 

Exactly. It is an illusion of security to make the sheeple feel comfortable until they are ready for sheering.

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