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With immediate effect, the US Department of Homeland Security, requires all persons intending to visit the United States under the "Visa Waiver Scheme" to personally obtain clearance for travel beforehand. It has, for a number of years, required airlines to submit detailed passenger lists in advance of departure but has now shifted the burden of obtaining clearance from the airlines to the individual passengers.

 

Intending passengers must now complete an online application, which the DHS says will take an average of 15 minutes per passenger and requires an amount of personal information to be supplied. Once the forms are completed and submitted, you'll be given a reference number and you'll need to check back, at a later date, to see if you've been approved and, if so, print the "authorisation notification" without which you'll not be able to check-in for your flight.

 

More details - and the online application process - is here at the DHS'Electronic System for Travel Authorisation (ESTA)

 

 

Mark

Edited by Markham
Corrected link - should be "https"
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It would be easier to drop the "Visa Waiver Scheme" and make people from those countries apply for a regular visa. They do everything the hard way and want to create even more bureaucracy. Sooner than

I for one feel so much safer. Those guys are really on the ball. People complain about millions of illegals so they respond by making it more difficult for legal access and then say how much safer an

If you are a US citizen married to a pinay and apply for a B1/B2 (tourist, non-immigrant) visa for her, fuggedaboudit.   My wife was summarily denied a B1/B2 visa on Monday (July 18, 2011) simply be

1. The link doesnt work.

 

2. It appears that they really, REALLY dont want ANY visitors to the US.

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It would be easier to drop the "Visa Waiver Scheme" and make people from those countries apply for a regular visa. They do everything the hard way and want to create even more bureaucracy. Sooner than later, America is going to become one large prison.

 

 

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broden

It would be easier to drop the "Visa Waiver Scheme" and make people from those countries apply for a regular visa. They do everything the hard way and want to create even more bureaucracy. Sooner than later, America is going to become one large prison.

 

 

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then we can all learn to dance :D

 

530f32f3-4542-e21e-2fbb-0623584bbac4-fb_FilipinoInmatesHonorMichaelJackson.jpg:cool_01:

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I am not a big fan of it either, however it is very painless to complete. The traveler just needs to state his / her name birth of date and passport number. These then get checked against a black list, and afterward the traveler gets a notification that he is ok for traveling to the US.

No big deal.

What is there worth visiting?

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1. The link doesnt work.

 

2. It appears that they really, REALLY dont want ANY visitors to the US.

 

Thanks, Alan, I have corrected the link in the original post. And I agree, it does seem that visitors aren't welcome there. I wonder what the US Tourism bodies think about this as it will certainly act as a deterrent for last minute bookings.

 

They should rename the "Visa Waiver Scheme" to "Preferred Visitors' Visa".

 

So now we must have a Visa to enter the US. How long will it be before other governments decide to impose reciprocal arrangements forcing Americans to apply for Visas to enter Britain, France, Germany, Norway or any other country that currently allows them Visa-free travel? The answer is, of course, it will never happen.

 

 

 

 

Mark

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The State Department is being reactive to criticisms that its weak on security and now its making regular visitors suffer for it. So my question is what about expats that are citizens and they want to visit family and friends. Are we subject to the same restrictions?

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tom_shor

What is there worth visiting?

 

You could come by my place and we could have a beer and BBQ some steaks. Bring your own beer and steaks. :P

 

Seriously what do you want to see? somewhere I am sure they got it.

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tom_shor

The State Department is being reactive to criticisms that its weak on security and now its making regular visitors suffer for it. So my question is what about expats that are citizens and they want to visit family and friends. Are we subject to the same restrictions?

 

I for one feel so much safer. :wink: Those guys are really on the ball. People complain about millions of illegals so they respond by making it more difficult for legal access and then say how much safer and more secure we are. Aren't they doing a wonderful job. :rofl: Here's where they are going to be checking you next. :P

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So now we must have a Visa to enter the US. How long will it be before other governments decide to impose reciprocal arrangements forcing Americans to apply for Visas to enter Britain, France, Germany, Norway or any other country that currently allows them Visa-free travel? The answer is, of course, it will never happen.

 

 

 

 

Mark

 

A precedent has already been set. Canada and the US didn't even require passports to cross the border between them, just a picture ID of some sort (driver's license, merchant marine Z card, military ID, etc.). Then the US began requiring a valid passport or an RFID-equipped Federal ID card to be able to enter the US, even if you were a US citizen that had visited Canada. So if we went to Canada without the Mark of the Beast (sorry, Markham) we weren't allowed back into our own country. After that went into effect Canada reciprocated. It's a small step from there to requiring visas and eliminating visa waivers all together.

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The State Department is being reactive to criticisms that its weak on security and now its making regular visitors suffer for it. So my question is what about expats that are citizens and they want to visit family and friends. Are we subject to the same restrictions?

 

No, not as a US citizen. The new regulations apply to citizens who previously could travel to the United States without a Visitors Visa which includes nationals from the UK, France, Germany, Norway, Israel etc. They must now apply for travel authorisation (ie a Visa) and answer exactly the same questions as are posed in the Vistors Visa Application forms.

 

The long and short of it is, the Visa Waiver scheme has been scrapped and all visitors to the US must have either a Visa stamped into their Passports or obtain an "ESTA".

 

 

 

 

Mark

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A precedent has already been set. Canada and the US didn't even require passports to cross the border between them, just a picture ID of some sort (driver's license, merchant marine Z card, military ID, etc.). Then the US began requiring a valid passport or an RFID-equipped Federal ID card to be able to enter the US, even if you were a US citizen that had visited Canada. So if we went to Canada without the Mark of the Beast (sorry, Markham) we weren't allowed back into our own country. After that went into effect Canada reciprocated. It's a small step from there to requiring visas and eliminating visa waivers all together.

 

Even though the UK is currently at the second highest "alert status" - meaning that the threat of a terrorist attack is imminent and real - it still allows visitors from the US to enter the country on Visa Waivers. More troubling. however, is the legal inability for the UK Borders Agency to impose meaningful checks on those entering the country from another EC member state, whilst at the same time pushing-through legislation which requires all its citizens to obtain (and carry) biometric ID cards. If only the UK followed the US example of requiring the collection of biometric data (iris and fingerprint scans) of all visitors entering the country, the carrying of ID cards might make more sense. Such a plan was mooted, by the way, and guess who opposed it! (A case of "do what we say not what we do".)

 

I'm in favour of ESTA but only because I would like my country to follow suit.

 

 

Mark

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1. The link doesnt work.

 

2. It appears that they really, REALLY dont want ANY visitors to the US.

 

Who the hell wants to go there anyway? I don't. :biggrin_01:

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