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'A government run like heaven by Americans'


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udonthani

anybody drawing a comparison between the Philippine insurrection and Vietnam just needs their head examining. The USA lost in Vietnam. Pretty important distinction, I would have thought.

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anybody drawing a comparison between the Philippine insurrection and Vietnam just needs their head examining. The USA lost in Vietnam. Pretty important distinction, I would have thought.

 

Who did that? BTW, I thought we won.

 

3024207625_f7aa645c85.jpg

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udonthani

+I thought we won.+

 

in the very unlikely event that one of the Presidium of the Vietnamese Communist Party is reading this, I think we can be reasonably confident they'd be laughing their head off. And it wouldn't be the first time such delusions caused much mirth.

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+I thought we won.+

 

in the very unlikely event that one of the Presidium of the Vietnamese Communist Party is reading this, I think we can be reasonably confident they'd be laughing their head off. And it wouldn't be the first time such delusions caused much mirth.

 

You mean this Commie Bitch?

 

7EcUb0e47H2kBcXuPrHoc.0.0.0x0.400x602.jpeg

 

The only good Presidium of the Vietnamese Communist Party is a dead Presidium of the Vietnamese Communist Party.

 

executionofavietconggueus4.jpg

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sandwindstars

'A government run like heaven by Americans'

 

By Carmen Guerrero Nakpil (The Philippine Star) Updated December 07, 2009 12:00 AM

 

Wrong, MLQ. We've been having a devil of a time for the last eight years, trying to change a government run like hell by one Filipina, and it looks like we'll never make it.

 

I'm not sure why Mrs. Nakpil would make a comment like this unless she's trying make brownie points for her favourite election candidates. For someone who lived through possibly flourished during the Marcos years, it's rich of her to make that comment.

 

Here's a link to a current exhibit in the National Museum in Manila: War & Dissent abut the Philippine American War (Philippine War of Independence). The events of that time is hardly comparable to the Malayan insurgency, more like Vietnam War.

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I'm not sure why Mrs. Nakpil would make a comment like this unless she's trying make brownie points for her favourite election candidates. For someone who lived through possibly flourished during the Marcos years, it's rich of her to make that comment.

 

Here's a link to a current exhibit in the National Museum in Manila: War & Dissent abut the Philippine American War (Philippine War of Independence). The events of that time is hardly comparable to the Malayan insurgency, more like Vietnam War.

 

 

Looks like a first class exhibit! Thanks for the info. Here are a few specifics for those able to attend:

 

War & Dissent (The U.S. In The Philippines, 1898-1915) is an exhibit presented by the Lopez of Balayan, Batangas Foundation and in partnership with the National Museum of the Philippines and Fundación Santiago. This exhibition was produced by the Presidio Trust, Presidio of San Francisco, California, Golden Gate National Parks.

 

The exhibit is open to the public from the 3rd of December 2009 until the 7th of March 2010, at the National Museum of the Filipino People, The West Wing Gallery, Fifth Floor, Former Finance Building, Finance Route, Teodoro Valencia Circle, Rizal Park, Ermita, Metro Manila.

 

The National Museum of the Filipino People is open Wednesdays to Saturdays, from 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM. It is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.

 

Admission costs ₱100 for Adults, ₱30 for students, and ₱80 for seniors.

 

*************************************************************************************

 

This year marks the 111st anniversary of the United States’ declaration of war against Spain, an auspicious moment to remember American’s first overseas war. The for war between the armed forces of the United States of America and the Philippines closely followed, from 1899 through 1915, and War & Dissent is an attempt to better understand this period a century hence. Historically, the term Philippine Insurection was long preferred by the United States, but Filipinos and an increasing number of American historians referred to these hostilities as the Philippine-American War. In 1999, the U.S. Library of Congress reclassified its references to use this term. Through archival photographs, carefully weighed texts, these displays invite the public to view those years through the lens of several themes:

 

  1. monuments that commemorate American presence in the Philippines;
  2. the Spanish-American War;
  3. America’s march towards the Philippines;
  4. the wars for Philippine independence;
  5. the story of one family at the end of the war;
  6. cartoons for and against conquest;
  7. Mark Twain and the voices of dissent
  8. the rise of a world power; and
  9. concluding remarks by a Filipino historian.

The exhibition and public programs offer differing sentiments on the Philippine-American War, including those expressed in a diary by an American foot soldier and in letters exchanged among members of the Lopez family of Balayan, Batangas. Other views include the dissenting voice of Mark Twain, an important figure of the Anti-Imperialist League, and the debates played out in the American press. By following the country’s first (and second) overseas war, the visitor follows the rise of a world power in tandem with the struggle for Philippine independence. Through carefully chosen images and accessibly written texts, this exhibition revisits events that lead to the entry by United States and the Philippines into modern history.

 

Mrs. Purissima (Petty) Benitez-Johannot has worked in museums in Manila, New York, and Geneva for the last thirty years. She is the author and editor of several publications on non-Western art and was English edition editor of Arts & Cultures magazine. She move to the Philippines in 2006 and is a Professorial Lecturer at the University of the Philippines.

Edited by Slick Willie
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I'm not sure 111st is the right way to write that up.

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Slick Willie

 

 

Please I have a few questions of genuine interest. I had heard some statements before but do not know their validity because I do not know if they are based on actual fact. You seemed to be well versed on the subject, so I hope you could shed some light on the subject.

 

Was the Philippines offered Statehood before Hawaii? and when the US turned over the Philippines, was it considered one if not the strongest economies in Asia? What happened? Who or what is the blame for the backslide in the Asian standing? What has to happen to bring about that change?

 

Respectfully Submitted,

James

 

James..."In Our Image"

by Stanley Karnow is a good place to separate fact from fiction in America's Philippine adventure.

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udonthani

The events of that time is hardly comparable to the Malayan insurgency, more like Vietnam War.

 

War of the Running Dogs: Malaya by Noel Barber

Noel Barber has written an engrossing book about the British victory over the Malay insurgency of the 1940s and 1950s. In the tradition of James Morris

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thebob

I'm not sure 111st is the right way to write that up.

 

I believe it should be 111th

(One hundred {and} eleventh).

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RogerDuMond

anybody drawing a comparison between the Philippine insurrection and Vietnam just needs their head examining. The USA lost in Vietnam. Pretty important distinction, I would have thought.

 

Hey Paul. How about setting up a forum where we could discuss politics if we want to. That way I could comment on this statement that isn't backed by the facts.

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Hey Paul. How about setting up a forum where we could discuss politics if we want to. That way I could comment on this statement that isn't backed by the facts.

 

 

Yeah, kinda like a "Church, State & Money" section.

Because we all know...it's Bush's fault.

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Slick Willie

 

 

Please I have a few questions of genuine interest. I had heard some statements before but do not know their validity because I do not know if they are based on actual fact. You seemed to be well versed on the subject, so I hope you could shed some light on the subject.

 

Was the Philippines offered Statehood before Hawaii? and when the US turned over the Philippines, was it considered one if not the strongest economies in Asia? What happened? Who or what is the blame for the backslide in the Asian standing? What has to happen to bring about that change?

 

Those are all great questions James. I have often wondered what the Philippines would be like today if they had officially become a state or a territory of the U.S.. Like Hawaii is today? Or maybe more like Guam? Probably something more like in between Guam and the present day Philippines - definitely a higher standard of living, less poverty and a better infrastructure, but at the cost of higher beach-front real estate prices.

 

Respectfully Submitted,

James

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I believe it should be 111th

(One hundred {and} eleventh).

 

 

Bilbo Baggins would say: "one hundred and eleventieth".

 

 

.

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