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Angie

Dili Versus Wala

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Angie

Dili Versus Wala

 

Dili means NOT and is used with nouns, adjectives, prepositions, verbs (future action negator.)

 

Ex. Dili siya doktor. He is not a doctor.

Dili ko taas. I am not tall.

Dili sa simbahan ang kasal. The wedding is not in the church.

Dili ko mokaon. I will not eat.

 

Dili is also used as a short response meaning NO.

 

Ex. A: Doktor ba siya? Is he a doctor?

B: Dili. No. (Dili siya doctor.)

 

A: Gwapa ba siya? Is she beautiful?

B: Dili. No. (Dili siya gwapa.)

 

A: Sa simbahan ba ang kasal?

B: Dili. No. (Dili sa simbahan ang kasal.)

 

A: Mokaon ka ba? Will you eat?

B: Dili. No. (Dili ko mokaon.)

 

Wala means NO or NOT and is used to talk about the absence of something, used with nouns, adjectives (feelings and sensations caused by something or someone) verbs (past and continuous action negator, regardless of the moods of the verbs.)

 

Ex. Wala ko

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cebubird

Thank you very much for that lesson.

I wish I had printer so I could get it all down pat.

My wife is not best translater in world as her english is not expansive, but since we will

be living in Cebu for rest of my life, I wnt to learn the language as much as possible.

thanks again for your lesson and god bless you

Bill Byrd

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Willie

Dili Versus Wala

 

Dili means NOT and is used with nouns, adjectives, prepositions, verbs (future action negator.)

 

Ex. Dili siya doktor. He is not a doctor.

Dili ko taas. I am not tall.

Dili sa simbahan ang kasal. The wedding is not in the church.

Dili ko mokaon. I will not eat.

 

Dili is also used as a short response meaning NO.

 

Ex. A: Doktor ba siya? Is he a doctor?

B: Dili. No. (Dili siya doctor.)

 

A: Gwapa ba siya? Is she beautiful?

B: Dili. No. (Dili siya gwapa.)

 

A: Sa simbahan ba ang kasal?

B: Dili. No. (Dili sa simbahan ang kasal.)

 

A: Mokaon ka ba? Will you eat?

B: Dili. No. (Dili ko mokaon.)

 

Wala means NO or NOT and is used to talk about the absence of something, used with nouns, adjectives (feelings and sensations caused by something or someone) verbs (past and continuous action negator, regardless of the moods of the verbs.)

 

Ex. Wala ko'y uyab. I have no boyfriend.

Wala ko gigutom. I am not hungry.

Wala ko gikapoy. I am not tired.

Wala ko nikaon. I did not eat.

Wala ko nagkaon. I am not eating.

Wala ko nahubog gabii. I did not get drunk last night.

Wala ko nakatulog gabii. I was not able to sleep last night.

 

Wala is also used as a short response meaning NO.

 

Ex. A: Naa ka'y uyab? Do you have a boyfriend?

B: Wala. No. (Wala ko'y uyab.)

 

A: Gigutom ka ba? Are you hungry?

B: Wala. No. (Wala ko gigutom.)

 

A: Gikapoy ka ba? Are you tired?

B: Wala. No. (Wala ko gikapoy.)

 

A: Nikaon ka ba? Did you eat?

B: Wala. No. (Wala ko nikaon.)

 

A: Nagkaon ka ba? Are you eating?

B: Wala. No. (Wala ko nagkaon.)

 

A: Nahubog ka ba gabii? Did you get drunk last night?

B: Wala. No. (Wala ko nahubog.)

 

A: Nakatulog ka ba gabii? Were you able to sleep last night?

B: Wala. No (Wala ko nakatulog gabii.)

 

So, if a beggar approaches you, say, "Wala ko'y kwarta! Dili ko datu, pobre ko!"

 

Actually seems learnable. I was intimidated until now. Although I've studied other languages, there's just something about regional dialects that seemed like they would be especially difficult. This is probably untrue. How much similar is Cebuano to other dialects or to Tagalog?

Edited by Slick Willie

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On-in-2

Actually seems learnable. I was intimidated until now. Although I've studied other languages, there's just something about regional dialects that seemed like they would be especially difficult. This is probably untrue. How much similar is Cebuano to other dialects or to Tagalog?

 

Learnable?

 

With Angie as a teacher...absolutely so.

 

On your own...maybe...but it will take you MUCH longer.

 

Pete of New Hampshire

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chimellie

Thanks so much Angie. My wife is not very good at translating Bisayan and I always asking her stuff. I need to learn it since we are moving there in the future.

I want to be fluent in Bisayan like Paul someday. Did you teach Paul everything he knows ?

 

Daghan salamat and keep teaching us please.

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Angie

Actually seems learnable. I was intimidated until now. Although I've studied other languages, there's just something about regional dialects that seemed like they would be especially difficult. This is probably untrue. How much similar is Cebuano to other dialects or to Tagalog?

Cebuano and Tagalog are two different languages. However some Cebuano words are now used and understood by Tagalog people.

 

Cebuano is one of the 8 major languages in the Philippines. Some cities in Mindanao are using Cebuano but they have their own dialect making it easier for us to distinguish them.

 

Example:

 

Cebuano Cebu Dialect = buwan, uwan, uwaw

 

Cebuano Mindanao Dialect = bulan, ulan, ulaw

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Angie

Thanks so much Angie. My wife is not very good at translating Bisayan and I always asking her stuff. I need to learn it since we are moving there in the future.

I want to be fluent in Bisayan like Paul someday. Did you teach Paul everything he knows ?

 

Daghan salamat and keep teaching us please.

Sure, Chi (is this your first name?)

 

I've heard that your house is in Talisay, I live in Bulacao, pretty close. I can go to your house for the class, hahahahaha....

 

I can share some with you through the forum but it will be different from learning it in person :D .

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Paul

When I was learning the differences, I just associated it this way:

 

Dili = future

Wala = past / present

 

 

Cebuano and Tagalog are two different languages. However some Cebuano words are now used and understood by Tagalog people.

 

Rarely, though, as far as I have seen. Most Tagalogs don't wish to know any Cebuano, if they can help it. Too often, the look down on Filipinos from the "provinces".

 

Cebuano is one of the 8 major languages in the Philippines. Some cities in Mindanao are using Cebuano but they have their own dialect making it easier for us to distinguish them.

 

And like 152 or 155 other dialects!

 

1. Tagalog

2. Cebuano

3. Waray

4. Pampanggo

5. Ilocano

6. Naga

7. Pangalatok

8. Ilonggo

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Art
How much similar is Cebuano to other dialects or to Tagalog?

I've wondered about this I wonder how similar in structure they are to each other. How many have the linkers nga, ng and how many have the word na. There seems to be similarities sometimes in words and sometimes in structure?

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chimellie

Sure, Chi (is this your first name?)

 

I've heard that your house is in Talisay, I live in Bulacao, pretty close. I can go to your house for the class, hahahahaha....

 

I can share some with you through the forum but it will be different from learning it in person :D .

 

Yeah I have a house in Tabunok, Talisay city, but I am back in the US for now.

 

My wife is a terrible teacher, sometimes she's not even sure how to say certain thing in Bisayan and she can't explain why they say things certain way. I found Bisayan grammar very confusing, so much harder to learn than English. Very tricky language, seems like you have to memorize a lot of words that used in a sentence and there's no rules applied, for example the words gi,sa,na,ni ....like gutom (hungry), but when asking if someone is hungry you would put the word "gi" in the front of it : gigutom. But you would use "ni" or "nag" when you ask if someone if they have eaten, like nikaon, nagkaon.....

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Paul

Chi,

 

You don't have to. I use slang most of the time, or short cuts when speaking Cebuano. The Filipinos will understand it just as well.

 

For example, "Chi, gutom naka?" Chi, are you hungry?

 

Pila emong edad? How old are you?

 

Iyot ta? LOL Nevermind what that one means. I'm just being bad.

 

Anyway, I keep it simple.

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Angie

Chi,

 

You don't have to. I use slang most of the time, or short cuts when speaking Cebuano. The Filipinos will understand it just as well.

 

For example, "Chi, gutom naka?" Chi, are you hungry?

 

Pila emong edad? How old are you?

 

Iyot ta? LOL Nevermind what that one means. I'm just being bad.

 

Anyway, I keep it simple.

Bad kaayo ka, Paul!!! :biggrin_01:

 

If you are talking to someone who can easily guess what you're trying to say, it will be ok. But some people don't want to take the time to even guess what you're saying, so they are most likely to either ignore you or laugh at you.

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Angie

I've wondered about this I wonder how similar in structure they are to each other. How many have the linkers nga, ng and how many have the word na. There seems to be similarities sometimes in words and sometimes in structure?

 

The Tagalog language has nga, ng, na.

 

nga = used in situations where the speaker is surprised or has discovered something.

 

Ex. Si Bill nga iyan. Yeah, that's Bill.

 

ng = is the Tagalog equivalent of ug in Cebuano, introducing the direct object of the verb.

 

Ex. Bumili ako ng manok. I bought some chicken. (Tagalog)

Nipalit ko ug manok. I bought some chicken. (Cebuano)

 

na = just like the Cebuano na, this means now, already, finally

 

Ex. Kumain na si Angie. Angie has already eaten.

Uuwi na ako. I will go home now.

 

In Paul's sentence, "Chi, gutom naka." the na there should not be attached to ka. It should be like this "Chi, gigutom na ka?" Peace, Paul :biggrin_01::):)

 

Hey, why am I discussing Tagalog here? Hehehehehe....

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Jay

Which one should I use to politely tell someone offering me something (like a street vendor or taxi driver) or a beggar "no"? Dili or wala?

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Mailman

Depends on if you are saying "no, you can't have money" or "I don't have any money". :biggrin_01:

Edited by Mailman

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