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Jess Bartone

I'm fairly sure Andrew is Australian:

 

Location:Sydney

 

in which case any electrical products he may wish to bring will work fine on 220 V using a simple travel adaptor. So far Mary's used Aus-purchased laptop, ni-cad charger, mobile phone charger, all 240v 50 hz, no probs after more than 1 year.

 

All I can say about house design is: keep the ensuitethumbsup.gif , and: do you really want stairs in your life?

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Previously I talked about our (wife and two kids) plans of moving back to the Philippines. We lived there seven years ago (for 3 years). This time around have been planning on buying some land in Sila

make sure its where you want to live forever as selling a house here is almost impossible

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Not sure if there would be too much value in buying plans in the US as they aren't going to be set up for concrete construction. Good idea to pour over design books though, to get lots of ideas.

 

It is in the general layout (it can be reconfigured to reinforced concrete or concrete block by the architect) and in the electrical, plumbing and air conditioning plans that the canned plans are valuable. Most Philippine architects don't seem to pay much attention to the utilities, and a Westerner will be baffled by the lack of outlets in rooms, three-way switches for lights, and lack of grounds or GCFI in the electrical system, p-traps and vent pipes in the sewer lines, pressure control in plumbing (it's mostly gravity-feed here with very little pressure) and lack of central air accommodations (if that is something you want). If you stick to canned house plans with stucco or stucco/masonry exteriors, then the conversion to concrete is pretty straight forward. I wouldn't build anything here using frame construction due to the subterrainian termite issue (they are everywhere). I would recommend a pressure tank (like the kind used for well water) and a purification system, no matter whether you are hooked to municipal water or a deep well. And, of course, you have to know whether there is a municipal sewer hookup or if you need a septic tank and drain field. I would advise you to list the things that are important to you and include them in the house specifications you give the architect. That will avoid some misunderstandings later.

 

The appliance issue is something I have been looking at too. There are actually quite a few places in Cebu City selling quality 220 volt appliances, but I haven't seen any 120 volt at all. I would hate having the wait for a major appliance to be shipped from overseas and then have to pay for it twice once it hits customs here (the import tariff is pretty steep on stuff like that). Right now, I am leaning toward 220 volt, since the appliances don't become so much an issue. I think I can use a travel transformer to use 120 volt stuff in a 220 volt outlet for the few things I can't find in 220 volt.

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It was actually my question on electrical. Andrew hadn't mentioned that. Somebody else brought up electrical, and I asked the question, since I am originally from the US. I think the value of a second floor in the philippines in in the enhanced views and in the breezes. (ten or twelve feet vertical doesn't seem like much, but it can mean the difference between breezes and no breezes here. The ground level vegetation here really affects the amount of breeze you get. There is certainly something to be said for single-story construction as you get older, but accommodations (a lift) can be added to a home later if you need it (if you provide for it in advance).

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Wow, I haven't looked at this thread for a while. Thanks for all the excellent input guys. Yes, I'm still in the planning stages. Re. the en-suite bathroom. My wife and I have gone over this lots of times and we don't need one. Anyway, here is our latest iteration.

 

Andrew

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You could create your own plan with your computer and give that to the architect. I found that using a scale of 1 pixel equals 1 centimeter with a paint program works well.

 

 

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Not a bad idea. I have Autocad here, so I was thinking to do just that. Or get the architect to come up with something and get him to send me the CAD file, which I can then make improvements/changes.

 

you can use 3d architect software.it is much easier to use since the software will provide anything from roof to furnitures. you just input the floor plan and the software will take care of everything

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Well, the architect and I have come up with a solution to issue stairs fitting into the design. We've added a kind of extension onto the end, which I like, as it kind of adds a bit more shape to the house. I've also drawn a kind of site development plan.

 

Regarding the electrics, we'll have the standard 220vac/60hz. As JesseB mentioned, I come from (Sydney) Australia, and we use 240vac/50hz. I'll be bringing everything except the our plasma tv (too big to fit into a BB Box and too thirsty). I've had no problems running stuff at 60hz..just that motors will run about 20% faster;)

 

Regarding the layout and design of the kitchen; I'm not too concerned with that at this stage.

 

Andrew

 

PS. You'll have to excuse the dimensions, as they are in millimetres, so just divide by 1000 to get meters;) Just click on the image to get a larger larger size...

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Jess Bartone

I like the compact design Andrew, everything makes sense, but... being Australian myself, I tend to look at designs through Aussie eyes, and I noticed the proximity of the kitchen to a dunny. Of course it's not an issue in Phils, but Aus Design Rules state that their must be at least 2 doors between a toilet and a food preparation area. Do you feel this is an issue?

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I like the compact design Andrew, everything makes sense, but... being Australian myself, I tend to look at designs through Aussie eyes, and I noticed the proximity of the kitchen to a dunny. Of course it's not an issue in Phils, but Aus Design Rules state that their must be at least 2 doors between a toilet and a food preparation area. Do you feel this is an issue?

 

You've got a good eye for detail. To tell you the truth, I never considered that. Perhaps I could move that door to the laundry.

 

Something like this...

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Jess Bartone

Problem solved! Excellent modification Andrew, it just looks right now, aesthetically as well as hygenically.

 

Jess.

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What did you use to draw those sketches?

 

I used AutoCad. I'm making sure the architect is also on AutoCad, and that way I can easily update/correct his drawings.

 

Andrew

 

Hi Andrew & all,

 

A friend of mine, Colin in Palawan has done all his plans using Google Sketchup Its free & seems to produce some very good results. 3D models of the house too

 

Cheers

 

UZI

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What did you use to draw those sketches?

 

I used AutoCad. I'm making sure the architect is also on AutoCad, and that way I can easily update/correct his drawings.

 

Andrew

 

Hi Andrew & all,

 

A friend of mine, Colin in Palawan has done all his plans using Google Sketchup Its free & seems to produce some very good results. 3D models of the house too

 

Cheers

 

UZI

 

Thanks for that, Uzi. In my work, I kind of get used to looking at 2d drawings all day. But I agree, doing it in 3d is a much better way of visualising the design.

 

Andrew

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broden

well as everyone knows .. i'm no expert :chopper:

 

but i know what i like .. and i like that design ;)

 

and Jess i've eaten in some peoples houses were even one door between the kitchen and the "facilities" was way too many :)

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well as everyone knows .. i'm no expert :chopper:

 

but i know what i like .. and i like that design ;)

 

and Jess i've eaten in some peoples houses were even one door between the kitchen and the "facilities" was way too many :)

 

Yeah, and with my increased rice intake when go back there, we'll need an industrial strength exhaust fan in that room :lol:

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Jess Bartone

Jess i've eaten in some peoples houses were even one door between the kitchen and the "facilities" was way too many laugh.gif

You know what? I'm not all that fussed about germs, when they're my own, but growing up in a western world with all its hygenic brainwashing tends to make us squeamish on these matters. I have stayed and eaten in a house like that (just a curtain dividing cr from kitchen), just put it out of my mind and never got sick.

 

Yeah, and with my increased rice intake when go back there, we'll need an industrial strength exhaust fan in that room laugh.gif

 

ROFLMAO.gif Just when my body adapts to a new diet and conditions, I have to come back here to work. Can't wait to be permanently adapted.

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  • 2 months later...

On our recent trip in March to Negros we decided to have the front wall/gate built(the rear CHB wall was done in December). A bit back to front I know, as you're supposed to build the house before doing the wall. The main reason for building it first was to try out a few workers. That and we had a couple of grand handy, so we thought "why not" :rolleyes: All up, the front wall with gate is around 21 meters long and the total price came in at P90,000. The labour for the steelwork was P15,000, the mouldings were P9000. And we bought all the materials and paid 3 guys by the day...took about 3 weeks all up. My brother in law kept an eye on things. The rear wall cost P70,000 for 30 meters.

 

Here are a few pics. We went back to Aus. a few days before they finished, so these pics are all I have at the moment.

 

The first photo is from the inside looking across the road. The house you can see being built will be a similar size to ours. His is squeezed onto a 200sqm block of land (ours is 404sqm). The second photo is from the front. The small kind of nipa hut being built will be to store cement etc. The last pic is of the guys doing the moulding on the curved section of the wall (the straight sections were pre-cast at their workshop).

 

Andrew

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