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kc8ual

Cost of drilling a well

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kc8ual

Anyone have any experience with having a well drilled here. I have seen them do it by hand but was wondering the costs. I don't need a well per say, but I do need a few holes drilled below the water table. I know that the MCWD well across the street from my house is 21 meters deep and elevation is 18.94 meters above sea level and there are 4 strata layers. I figure 2 20 meter deep 6 inch wide holes will suffice figuring a consistent ground temperature at 10 meters of ~67

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daz

Sounds like a great idea. I forget what it is called.

I looked into this for heating in Canada when I had acreage. It was very efficient for heating and cooling. BUT very expensive to install/purchase. I am sure it would be much cheaper in The Philippines.

Let us know the details of the system, I am very intrested.

 

Regards,

 

Daddy Daz

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kc8ual

Its Geothermal. the most expensive part back in the states and Canada is the cost of boring the hole. The deepest well in Cebu is an MCWD well in Talamban at 200 meters. Most are 100 meters or less. Here on the island, its only 20 meters (but will hit water at 10 meters). In most of the mainland US, you need 40 meters at a minimum to hit the water table (If you are lucky) but even then, a single loop at 40 meters is enough for like 12,000 BTU or something to that effect.

 

I don't need it that cold. Shoot I have been here so long that going to the mall requires long pants and shirt. I figure a 10 degree drop inside the home and keeping the humidity levels in or around 50% - 60% will work wonders. So to achieve this I only really need 1 cubic foot (7.5 gallons) of water in circulation. Properly primed and sealed I can get by with a 50 watt circulating pump and a 5 gallon tank in the ground; bout a meter down.

 

We'll see though. We are moving into our new home hopefully by the end of the month. I am waiting on PLDT, and PLDT is waiting on a new fiber switch because the one less then a mile away is already maxed out (maxed capacity in less then 6 months since its installation). The engineer says by the end of the month is his goal. The process of running the trunk through the 467 home subdivision will only take a week, week and a half tops; and they've already agreed to install my drop when they pass my lot so we can do a simultaneous switch on moving day.

 

Father-in-law is coming down from Bantayan Island next week to do the upstairs partitioning (P20,000 in materials and P0 in labor). He's a great carpenter, even makes the door and doorjambs by hand. As soon as he is finished, we have the tile guys coming in to run the ceramic tiles and he's gonna stay on as foreman for the week it takes to finish off the tiles.

 

On my spare time (which is very limited with the work I am doing on this book) I have been working on LED lighting for the home so I can have light even if the power goes out. Since I still won't have a fan during a blackout, there is a necessity to cool the home (not a lot, just enough... ~10

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daz

Let us know how it goes with the geothermal. Hope the book goes well. What type of book are you writing?

 

Can you get the geothermal supplies in the Philippines?

 

Cheers,

 

 

Darren

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kc8ual

I have not really seen any supplies here. You can get the pipes because they use them here for water pipes, but I cannot find the U connectors for the end of the loop. Probably have to make them myself. But before I try the geothermal, I am going to try something else a little cheaper. Basically, I am going to build a small chimney running up to the roof line and paint it black. As the sun hits it, the air inside warms up. The warm air rises and expands creating a vacuum at the bottom. Have a small opening at the bottom and then using the venturi affect, have some PVC pipes running right into the house just below the ceiling line.The venturi will create a vacuum at the point where the PVC pipe runs from the house to the chimney and suck out the hot air. Basically an open-loop thermosyphon set-up utilizing the venturi effect to draw the hot air out.

 

Also contemplating the cheapest and easiest way to make use of the moving air column to dehumidify the house at the same time. Probably end up having to place an underground air tube across the property about a meter down and have the opening come to the base of the chimney and place a heat exchanger there so that the moving air causes the heat exchanger to cool and thus dehumidifying the house. If I can get the heat exchanger to work on a closed thermosyphon loop, then the only electricity used would be a fan inside the home to force the air in the course through the heat exchanger.

 

If I can feasible get a 20 degree drop in temp and a 40% drop in humidity, the house would stay very comfortable even during a blackout because the hot air will always be sucked out of the home as long as the sun is heating up the chimney.

 

I will give that a try first and if it woks post it on the self sufficiency area.

 

Speaking of, can a mod move this to the do it yourself sufficiency forum please.

 

-Nick

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thebob

I have not really seen any supplies here. You can get the pipes because they use them here for water pipes, but I cannot find the U connectors for the end of the loop. Probably have to make them myself. But before I try the geothermal, I am going to try something else a little cheaper. Basically, I am going to build a small chimney running up to the roof line and paint it black. As the sun hits it, the air inside warms up. The warm air rises and expands creating a vacuum at the bottom. Have a small opening at the bottom and then using the venturi affect, have some PVC pipes running right into the house just below the ceiling line.The venturi will create a vacuum at the point where the PVC pipe runs from the house to the chimney and suck out the hot air. Basically an open-loop thermosyphon set-up utilizing the venturi effect to draw the hot air out.

 

Also contemplating the cheapest and easiest way to make use of the moving air column to dehumidify the house at the same time. Probably end up having to place an underground air tube across the property about a meter down and have the opening come to the base of the chimney and place a heat exchanger there so that the moving air causes the heat exchanger to cool and thus dehumidifying the house. If I can get the heat exchanger to work on a closed thermosyphon loop, then the only electricity used would be a fan inside the home to force the air in the course through the heat exchanger.

 

If I can feasible get a 20 degree drop in temp and a 40% drop in humidity, the house would stay very comfortable even during a blackout because the hot air will always be sucked out of the home as long as the sun is heating up the chimney.

 

I will give that a try first and if it woks post it on the self sufficiency area.

 

Speaking of, can a mod move this to the do it yourself sufficiency forum please.

 

-Nick

 

What an excellent application of thermodynamics.

 

I think a couple of experiments with some pipe could be helpful. I think you need to match the thermal mass of the pipe with its volume. and calculate an expected air flow and match the thermal mass of the pipe, with the mass of air.

 

Black pipe exterior with a reflective interior. the heat transfer is almost entirely due to conduction at the surface of the pipe.

 

The inefficiency is because of the lack of surface area in the black pipe. this could be improved by hanging other black pipes inside the larger one.

Which would then be heated by radiation from the sides.

 

I'd envisage a 20cm diameter black iron pipe about 75cm long with a few 3cm pipes hanging inside. The ducting could be PVC. I'd avoid the venturi at the bottom because flow is every thing here to keep as much air as possible flowing past the 'heat exchanger'.

 

Eventually this could be used to draw air past your ground loop increasing the heat differential.

 

I think there is great potential here for passive solar cooling.

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kc8ual

Well actually, I would use the 6" PVC drain pipes to build the chimney, and yes, have underground pipes to increase the temperature differential. Placing a venturi in the PVC pipes is easy... Some Nichrome resistance wire coiled around a section of PVC, slowly heat it up and tighten, the result being a nice and smooth venturi. They would not be at the ground though, only at the point in which they would be used to suck out the hot air from the home, so the ceiling line of the first and second floors.

 

Which also reminds me theBob, I tried sending a book update and your PM was unable to receive the PM.

 

-Nick

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cdpino

Well actually, I would use the 6" PVC drain pipes to build the chimney, and yes, have underground pipes to increase the temperature differential. Placing a venturi in the PVC pipes is easy... Some Nichrome resistance wire coiled around a section of PVC, slowly heat it up and tighten, the result being a nice and smooth venturi. They would not be at the ground though, only at the point in which they would be used to suck out the hot air from the home, so the ceiling line of the first and second floors.

 

Which also reminds me theBob, I tried sending a book update and your PM was unable to receive the PM.

 

-Nick

Cool thread!

 

-C

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Chaz

I have not really seen any supplies here. You can get the pipes because they use them here for water pipes, but I cannot find the U connectors for the end of the loop. Probably have to make them myself. But before I try the geothermal, I am going to try something else a little cheaper. Basically, I am going to build a small chimney running up to the roof line and paint it black. As the sun hits it, the air inside warms up. The warm air rises and expands creating a vacuum at the bottom. Have a small opening at the bottom and then using the venturi affect, have some PVC pipes running right into the house just below the ceiling line.The venturi will create a vacuum at the point where the PVC pipe runs from the house to the chimney and suck out the hot air. Basically an open-loop thermosyphon set-up utilizing the venturi effect to draw the hot air out.

 

Also contemplating the cheapest and easiest way to make use of the moving air column to dehumidify the house at the same time. Probably end up having to place an underground air tube across the property about a meter down and have the opening come to the base of the chimney and place a heat exchanger there so that the moving air causes the heat exchanger to cool and thus dehumidifying the house. If I can get the heat exchanger to work on a closed thermosyphon loop, then the only electricity used would be a fan inside the home to force the air in the course through the heat exchanger.

 

If I can feasible get a 20 degree drop in temp and a 40% drop in humidity, the house would stay very comfortable even during a blackout because the hot air will always be sucked out of the home as long as the sun is heating up the chimney.

 

I will give that a try first and if it woks post it on the self sufficiency area.

 

Speaking of, can a mod move this to the do it yourself sufficiency forum please.

 

-Nick

 

Sounds like some good ideas here.

 

Re the geothermal and you being unable to get a U connection, I'm not sure what size bore hole you are thinking of

but I'm guessing a u connection would give quite a big separation space requiring quite a large bore hole? What about instead using 2" nominal bore pipe with shorter 1" nominal bore pipe inside it capped at the end with a 2" cap (all readily available here i.e. Belmont tools), then pump water down the 1" tube and it cools coming back up the 2" tube?

 

Re air circulation, many of the tin smiths here make those spinning roof caps with fins, even a small wind spins them and the fins draw air up the conduit they are fitted on, good example of a tin smith making those on the RH side of the North Highway just before you get to Fooda in Consolascion?

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kc8ual

Sounds like some good ideas here.

 

Re the geothermal and you being unable to get a U connection, I'm not sure what size bore hole you are thinking of

but I'm guessing a u connection would give quite a big separation space requiring quite a large bore hole? What about instead using 2" nominal bore pipe with shorter 1" nominal bore pipe inside it capped at the end with a 2" cap (all readily available here i.e. Belmont tools), then pump water down the 1" tube and it cools coming back up the 2" tube?

 

Re air circulation, many of the tin smiths here make those spinning roof caps with fins, even a small wind spins them and the fins draw air up the conduit they are fitted on, good example of a tin smith making those on the RH side of the North Highway just before you get to Fooda in Consolascion?

 

You can't place the piping inside one another. The system is a heat exchanger which takes the heat from the house and exchanges it for the cool in the ground. If you place one pipe inside another, then irregardless of which way you pipe the fluid (air or water) through the system, the outgoing hot will exchange for the incoming cold and vice versa making the return fluid no cooler then when it is pumped out. It has to be two separate pipes or it would never work.

 

-Nick

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WeGermans

You can't place the piping inside one another. The system is a heat exchanger which takes the heat from the house and exchanges it for the cool in the ground. If you place one pipe inside another, then irregardless of which way you pipe the fluid (air or water) through the system, the outgoing hot will exchange for the incoming cold and vice versa making the return fluid no cooler then when it is pumped out. It has to be two separate pipes or it would never work.

 

-Nick

 

 

Not exactly true, though I see your point. The PVC pipe itself is an insulator, and the effective surface area of the outside pipe is greater than the inside pipe meaning better heat transfer with the surrounding area. It might work, just be less efficient than the U joint idea, however you could get by with drilling a smaller hole per tube, saving you cost on installation and repair. If you have the inside pipe end a few inches up, the area at the bottom can act as a resevoir and may actualy make it work better as it sits there in volume and has more time to dump its heat before returning up the large pipe. If you made the end of the outer pipe much larger than the rest of it you would effectively be putting a reservoir at the bottom that would give even more volume and time for cooling. If you are very concerned about the heat transfer near the top you could use a thicker walled inner pipe near the top, this would have the effect of speeding up the outer water and having it in contact with the inner pipe wall for less time near the top limiting the heat transfer there.

 

I think the pipe in a pipe idea is worth looking into, it solves a few issues and may not make as many as you think.

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Cebuned

Did I miss the answer? Still wondering myself, whats the rough cost to have a well drilled on one's property? Water well that is...

 

Thanks,

Ned

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misty

Did I miss the answer? Still wondering myself, whats the rough cost to have a well drilled on one's property? Water well that is...

 

Thanks,

Ned

 

When we had our wells dug, they charged us by cylinder. For example, a cylinder cost 250, it also means that labor is also 250. Multiply that by how many cylinder you'll have for your well, say 15 cylinder deep, that's 250x2x15=7,500 pesos. Extra bits that you can add to your deep well, pvc pipe, hand pump, pressure pump or just a bucket attached to a very long rope. hehe

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Bet_Busta

Did I miss the answer? Still wondering myself, whats the rough cost to have a well drilled on one's property? Water well that is...

 

Thanks,

Ned

 

It's about P200 to 250 per foot for a 2" pipe casing and 400 to 500 for a 4" pipe, 4" casing is needed for a submersible pump. Maybe more for Mactan as one will be drilling on hard rock.

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Cebuned

Did I miss the answer? Still wondering myself, whats the rough cost to have a well drilled on one's property? Water well that is...

 

Thanks,

Ned

 

It's about P200 to 250 per foot for a 2" pipe casing and 400 to 500 for a 4" pipe, 4" casing is needed for a submersible pump. Maybe more for Mactan as one will be drilling on hard rock.

OMG, thats just so much cheaper than here in the States, and what a water well drilled would cost you.....Nice to know, thanks everyone...

 

ned

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