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American, shot dead in Dumanjug, Cebu


David_LivinginTalisay

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thebob

rainymike and joe, thanks for your comments on the post by Joe Kano.

 

I think that between you, your replies pretty much sum up my feelings.

 

I've looked at Joe Kano's post a couple of times and each time I wanted to explain the attractions of living here, it dawned on me that there is no one answer for each of his points, but the sum of my experience here, 'far' outweighs any draw backs.

 

There are those who live in compounds, dress up and ride SUV's, there are those who live a more local lifestyle, neither is right or wrong. These are just some of the choices available.

 

Anyone who knew John Zuke, will tell you that he was an extremely creative man. He described himself as an artist, and it was plain to see that he used 'art' in his everyday life.

 

He was also very strong willed, and his move to Dumanjug was his way of responding to a situation that made him feel cheated.

 

I am unaware of his situation in Dumanjug, but to hear that he fell pray to the kind of person who would use deadly force saddens me but also uplifts me, because he was aware of the dangers of his lifestyle, but did not back down from intimidation or threat.

 

He was generous to his neighbors, but in a quiet and private way. This generosity was mistaken for weakness.

 

Although we, as foreigners perceive ourselves to be targets, we must remember that there are many honest people in this country, who do not have our option of leaving. These honest people struggle against corruption and intimidation and still hold a love of this wonderful country in their hearts.

 

When I see the strong family bonds, and the struggle to find money for food and education, the pure selflessness that is devoted to improve the prospects of the young. I feel glad that I am allowed to live among them, and in some way share their dreams.

 

If you come here from an 'advanced' country, expecting things to be just the same as home, but cheaper, you will be disappointed. We may take for granted, good infrastructure, safety and 'rights' in our own countries, but here we get to experience the struggle that created those things, that we have become complacent about.

 

Some people have visions of utopia, and dream of the results of progress, to others, including me it is that struggle towards the future, however imperfect, that I find uplifting.

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May the greedy murdering bastards be damned.   How to survive in a corrupt land? Keep a low profile. Avoid financial entanglements with locals. Avoid disputes with locals. Don't make enemies.   .

David when are you going to realize typing long winded responses time and time again over and over again, is a waste of bandwidth, get over it! you lost your wives commission money now move on! I for

I don't think it's really a good idea to post so much information about this when there's still an ongoing investigation. You never know who may be reading this public forum.

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<br />rainymike and joe, thanks for your comments on the post by Joe Kano.<br /><br />I think that between you, your replies pretty much sum up my feelings. <br /><br />I've looked at Joe Kano's post a couple of times and each time I wanted to explain the attractions of living here, it dawned on me that there is no one answer for each of his points, but the sum of my experience here, 'far' outweighs any draw backs.<br /><br />There are those who live in compounds, dress up and ride SUV's, there are those who live a more local lifestyle, neither is right or wrong. These are just some of the choices available.<br /><br />Anyone who knew John Zuke, will tell you that he was an extremely creative man. He described himself as an artist, and it was plain to see that he used 'art' in his everyday life.<br /><br />He was also very strong willed, and his move to Dumanjug was his way of responding to a situation that made him feel cheated.<br /><br />I am unaware of his situation in Dumanjug, but to hear that he fell pray to the kind of person who would use deadly force saddens me but also uplifts me, because he was aware of the dangers of his lifestyle, but did not back down from intimidation or threat. <br /><br />He was generous to his neighbors, but in a quiet and private way. This generosity was mistaken for weakness.<br /><br />Although we, as foreigners perceive ourselves to be targets, we must remember that there are many honest people in this country, who do not have our option of leaving. These honest people struggle against corruption and intimidation and still hold a love of this wonderful country in their hearts.<br /><br />When I see the strong family bonds, and the struggle to find money for food and education, the pure selflessness that is devoted to improve the prospects of the young. I feel glad that I am allowed to live among them, and in some way share their dreams.<br /><br />If you come here from an 'advanced' country, expecting things to be just the same as home, but cheaper, you will be disappointed. We may take for granted, good infrastructure, safety and 'rights' in our own countries, but here we get to experience the struggle that created those things, that we have become complacent about.<br /><br />Some people have visions of utopia, and dream of the results of progress, to others, including me it is that struggle towards the future, however imperfect, that I find uplifting.<br />
<br /><br /><br />

 

Yet another in a series of great posts in this thread...

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Just my opinion, but the Philippines is not the ideal place for a foreigner to live or retire. Yup, it's got palm trees swaying in the breeze, an island atmosphere, pretty girls all around, reasonable prices for some things, more freedom than living in a 1st world country, but to say this place is "Paradise" is really pushing it.

 

I am no expert on the Philippines, but from living here now for about 3 1/2 years, I feel there are just too many negatives in relation to the positives.

 

I have spent a boat-load of money on a house and lot, so I really can't just walk away from it all right now.

 

If you have the cash, I think the best thing to do is live in a gated secure subdivision. My wifes family live in a non-gated lower middle class subdivision. They tell me of home robberies taking place all the time there. I guess that is why the average Filipino always has someone in the house 24/7, but there are always break-in's there at night anyway. I would not worry much about leaving my house doors unlocked in my subdivision, but again, security is still importnt wherever you live.

 

Although the subdivision I live in is very secure, I think having a handgun in the house (preferably in the bedroom) is a good idea. We don't have children, so I don't worry about kids getting hold of a loaded .45

 

Owning a car also adds to safety. I feel much safer going places in my car than if I were to use jeepneys.

 

I try to treat the locals with respect. A smile goes along ways. I don't hang around squatter areas, and I think your just an easy target by doing this. Common sense goes a long ways here too.

 

I don't "dress up" and wear fancy clothes or jewelry , but I don't dress down either .... I think the foreigner that "dresses down" in some attempt to look poor is only kidding himself.

 

Anyway, that's kinda how I feel about this place. It's not ideal ... but I made the choice to live here.

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rainymike

rainymike and joe, thanks for your comments on the post by Joe Kano.

 

If you come here from an 'advanced' country, expecting things to be just the same as home, but cheaper, you will be disappointed. We may take for granted, good infrastructure, safety and 'rights' in our own countries, but here we get to experience the struggle that created those things, that we have become complacent about.

 

Some people have visions of utopia, and dream of the results of progress, to others, including me it is that struggle towards the future, however imperfect, that I find uplifting.

 

I think that's what fascinates me the most about this country. For the most part, America has achieved a lot and is kind of old hat for me. But here in the Philippines, I see a country on the move. Sure it has a lot of zits, but so did America a century ago. It's really nice to watch as things unfold here and for progress to take place. Maybe in some minds it is slow, but it's happening.

 

You can focus on the zits, or you can look to a country that's growing and changing. Spent an evening with a family from the poor side of town, just a hair above being a squatter settlement. It's a tough life they lead, but they seem to have the balls to deal with it and keep on trying to overcome the worst. A lot of courage and moxie in my opinion.

 

Hell, they aren't whining about dried fish and rice. They're frigging greatful for it. Something I think we Americans have lost because we're too pampered and soft. Risky for me to enter this part of town ... probably, but I can't live in a cave. And they taught me something about life and the spirit of people able to overcome the worst that life has to offer. I don't believe they are hopeless or helpless at all, but I know they have a long way to go.

 

I'll take a life full of people like this anyday, even with the risks involved. Something alive about them. On the other hand, when I catch myself sitting in some kano bar listening to music from the 70's with a ton of other old farts like myself, I wonder who really has an impoverished life.

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eggnoggin

Spent a lot of time in africa..remote south america ...and grew up in the pi..and can tell you that asking many old people who once dined on fellow humanoids... almost to a one smiled and licked their lips.. several said theyd still be doin it if they could find a steady supply of errant whiteys..thats right amigos..jolly bee aint got nothin on expat fricasee...one very famous anthropologist took several pygmies out of the forest where they normally spent their entire life in a canopy of filtered light seeing no more than 8 feet at the most..as they looked out over miles of plains and thousands of animals from two thousand feet up..the pygmies repeatedly reached out to try and pick up some of these tiny animals..the way one thinks hes being percieved by others...especially among indigenous populations..is a key factor in assessing the parameters of vulnerability and effectivness of defence mechanisms... of the hundreds of expats i know around the world..most that continue to rationlaize living in the third world using various projected hometown "perspectives" are actually mesmerized by morbid fascination as they begin to subconciously assimilate the suppressed rites and rituals of people emerging from tribalism acted out in the subliminal formation of laws and politics around them..sort of like a perpetual sunday ...usually referred to as a dereistic day..where you drift and dream .associate and subconciously prioritze the weeks events..and decide about the important things in life..bj or beer first on monday .. or bj with beer ..etc..its really nothing personal usually ..the whirling phantasmagoria of primitives suspended in the perspective of pygmies on distant cliffs makes our vaporous reflections somewhat insignificant..

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Spent a lot of time in africa..remote south america ...and grew up in the pi..and can tell you that asking many old people who once dined on fellow humanoids... almost to a one smiled and licked their lips.. several said theyd still be doin it if they could find a steady supply of errant whiteys..thats right amigos..jolly bee aint got nothin on expat fricasee...one very famous anthropologist took several pygmies out of the forest where they normally spent their entire life in a canopy of filtered light seeing no more than 8 feet at the most..as they looked out over miles of plains and thousands of animals from two thousand feet up..the pygmies repeatedly reached out to try and pick up some of these tiny animals..the way one thinks hes being percieved by others...especially among indigenous populations..is a key factor in assessing the parameters of vulnerability and effectivness of defence mechanisms... of the hundreds of expats i know around the world..most that continue to rationlaize living in the third world using various projected hometown "perspectives" are actually mesmerized by morbid fascination as they begin to subconciously assimilate the suppressed rites and rituals of people emerging from tribalism acted out in the subliminal formation of laws and politics around them..sort of like a perpetual sunday ...usually referred to as a dereistic day..where you drift and dream .associate and subconciously prioritze the weeks events..and decide about the important things in life..bj or beer first on monday .. or bj with beer ..etc..its really nothing personal usually ..the whirling phantasmagoria of primitives suspended in the perspective of pygmies on distant cliffs makes our vaporous reflections somewhat insignificant..

 

That was a good try sir. In the beginning of that post I could easily understand your writing and followed it easily. But then you began slipping back into the fog that is eggnoggindom and at the end you were lost again. Keep up the good work but do try and utilize the free spellcheckers so readily available on the net. LOLOL Just poking fun mate!

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I think that's what fascinates me the most about this country. For the most part, America has achieved a lot and is kind of old hat for me. But here in the Philippines, I see a country on the move. Sure it has a lot of zits, but so did America a century ago. It's really nice to watch as things unfold here and for progress to take place. Maybe in some minds it is slow, but it's happening.

 

You can focus on the zits, or you can look to a country that's growing and changing. Spent an evening with a family from the poor side of town, just a hair above being a squatter settlement. It's a tough life they lead, but they seem to have the balls to deal with it and keep on trying to overcome the worst. A lot of courage and moxie in my opinion.

 

Hell, they aren't whining about dried fish and rice. They're frigging greatful for it. Something I think we Americans have lost because we're too pampered and soft. Risky for me to enter this part of town ... probably, but I can't live in a cave. And they taught me something about life and the spirit of people able to overcome the worst that life has to offer. I don't believe they are hopeless or helpless at all, but I know they have a long way to go.

 

I'll take a life full of people like this anyday, even with the risks involved. Something alive about them. On the other hand, when I catch myself sitting in some kano bar listening to music from the 70's with a ton of other old farts like myself, I wonder who really has an impoverished life.

 

I 100% agree, we went on vacation recently and were away in the UK for a month. The thing we noticed most on the way home from the airport was that everyone was smiling. Even the guys on the side of the street with nothing. They were mostly all looking happy. I don't think i saw 20 people smiling while walking around in the UK.

 

People know how to relax and enjoy their blessings here and have forgotten it in the west...

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The problem however is in managing to keep a 'low profile'!

 

A foreigner would have to live in little more than a 'Nippa Hut' to keep a really low profile. Have a half decent house, better than the ones around you, they will consider you 'wealthy' and you become a potential 'target'?

 

We have lived in a modest 'Camella Homes' Subdivision, here in Lawa-an 1, Talisay City. There are few Foreigners living here, but scattered around the subdivision, and very much in the minority. None have particularly big or splended houses, since there are 'locals' with bigger and better houses, and larger, more expensive SUV cars. The locals assume we dont have that much money or we would be in a much more up-class subdivision,. and drive a more expensive vehicle. We have never been broken into, in nearly 9 years of owning a house here, and it is not a 'gated subdivision with a wall all around. Then again we never leave the house empty or unattended either.

I had to commute to work from Norwalk CT to Columbia Univ in NYC daily. I parked my car, an old beaten Datsun B210, under the subway tracks as they cross 125th Street and Broadway. My old nasty Datsun was never broken into while cars around mine were. Relative conspicuous consumption triggers envy anywhere.

 

The Philippines are

- dreadfully poor

- had their cultures suppressed where not destroyed for by European colonizers

- that the US annexed, via a corrupt deal between McKinley and William Jennings Bryant, as we suppressed the Filipino insurgents who had fought Spain with the US under the understanding that they would become independent

- who waged guerrilla warfare with Allied soldiers throughout the Japanese occupation assuming that Roosevelt's promises to decolonize Asian and Africa would hold

- who suffered under America's Marcos's rule while fighting at our side in Vietnam and absorbing the compulsions of American consumerism

- who suffer watching their lovely young women and children serving sex tourists from around the world

 

I am surprised that relatively rich Americans, European, and Asian men are not routine targets of hate crimes.

 

And to poke my newbee nose (knowing it will probably suffer a few wild swings) deeper into another of the boards controversies, I think people set themselves up for failure if not violence by trying to recreate an American nuclear families in the Philippines or with their bride in the US. The culture appears to me to be fundamentally oriented around family, clan,neighborhood, and - occasionally - the workplace. I watched the horrific Murder in the Family film today and it occurred to me that if they had moved to the wive's village after getting married that HER behavior would have been constrained by the surround of her family in a context of 0 privacy.

 

Many commentators on this board routinely see their amorata's ever growing desire to finance an ever growing network of friends and family as evidence of some deeply malign factors in the culture. If, instead, one sees it in the context of Filipino generosity and poverty - prestige is guaged by gifts given and received, ones ability to be the breadwinner for the extended family, and the middle class and upper class's reliance on servants. The folks who seem happiest on this board are those who have worked to accept and understand their adopted culture.

 

-Chris

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Spent a lot of time in africa..remote south america ...and grew up in the pi..and can tell you that asking many old people who once dined on fellow humanoids... almost to a one smiled and licked their lips.. several said theyd still be doin it if they could find a steady supply of errant whiteys..thats right amigos..jolly bee aint got nothin on expat fricasee...one very famous anthropologist took several pygmies out of the forest where they normally spent their entire life in a canopy of filtered light seeing no more than 8 feet at the most..as they looked out over miles of plains and thousands of animals from two thousand feet up..the pygmies repeatedly reached out to try and pick up some of these tiny animals..the way one thinks hes being percieved by others...especially among indigenous populations..is a key factor in assessing the parameters of vulnerability and effectivness of defence mechanisms... of the hundreds of expats i know around the world..most that continue to rationlaize living in the third world using various projected hometown "perspectives" are actually mesmerized by morbid fascination as they begin to subconciously assimilate the suppressed rites and rituals of people emerging from tribalism acted out in the subliminal formation of laws and politics around them..sort of like a perpetual sunday ...usually referred to as a dereistic day..where you drift and dream .associate and subconciously prioritze the weeks events..and decide about the important things in life..bj or beer first on monday .. or bj with beer ..etc..its really nothing personal usually ..the whirling phantasmagoria of primitives suspended in the perspective of pygmies on distant cliffs makes our vaporous reflections somewhat insignificant..

My mentor in anthropology and musicology considered the pygmies to carry the oldest living traces of human culture. Perhaps you might listen to their music rather than imaging their dining habits .....

 

-Chris

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eggnoggin

gotta love you guys ..spent two weeks in the pi and some time in cebu not too long ago.. getting to know the place and no one even said hello or noticed...maybe your mentor should have concentrated on incomprehensable reading comprehension :wt-hell: ...its a gift a puzzle a little nuzzle the zees and cees are the keys to please...its almost xmas amigos...see yall soon..i got to see the poor boys new digs..youve got the cypher..with some sweat and a little fun ...its an easy 1000 to 1..way better than 46...man its hard typing in these restraints..almost time for meds and oatmeal ..

Edited by eggnoggin
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"Murky underbelly of normal life in Cebu."

 

To me, "in Cebu" refers to Cebu City, as opposed to on Cebu.

 

On Cebu?

 

:wt-hell:

 

Well, I do get on, to get in, if rested for 2 weeks with no disco during that time ...but or course, we then are talking about shooting other things.

 

It's like saying New Yorkers are all rude, sarcastic, know how to fight with a blade while snapping their fingers and singing show tunes. Sure, might be true, but New York City is NOT New York. Actually, upstate New Yorkers are vastly different then the city folk...upstaters cheat at checkers, nap in front of gas stations and stare at cows for hours. City New Yorkers cheat at traffic lights, nap while driving and think cows have dicks...and then stare for hours at the size of the thing, not realizing it's a horse.

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Spent a lot of time in africa..remote south america ...and grew up in the pi..and can tell you that asking many old people who once dined on fellow humanoids... almost to a one smiled and licked their lips.. several said theyd still be doin it if they could find a steady supply of errant whiteys..thats right amigos..jolly bee aint got nothin on expat fricasee...one very famous anthropologist took several pygmies out of the forest where they normally spent their entire life in a canopy of filtered light seeing no more than 8 feet at the most..as they looked out over miles of plains and thousands of animals from two thousand feet up..the pygmies repeatedly reached out to try and pick up some of these tiny animals..the way one thinks hes being percieved by others...especially among indigenous populations..is a key factor in assessing the parameters of vulnerability and effectivness of defence mechanisms... of the hundreds of expats i know around the world..most that continue to rationlaize living in the third world using various projected hometown "perspectives" are actually mesmerized by morbid fascination as they begin to subconciously assimilate the suppressed rites and rituals of people emerging from tribalism acted out in the subliminal formation of laws and politics around them..sort of like a perpetual sunday ...usually referred to as a dereistic day..where you drift and dream .associate and subconciously prioritze the weeks events..and decide about the important things in life..bj or beer first on monday .. or bj with beer ..etc..its really nothing personal usually ..the whirling phantasmagoria of primitives suspended in the perspective of pygmies on distant cliffs makes our vaporous reflections somewhat insignificant..

 

Bj or beer first on Monday? Ummmm, I'll have beer later.

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I haven't seen any examples of police (or any other government official's) incompetency so far. They're understaffed and underfunded, though

Thats good to hear. The senior police officer I knew was dedicated. When he asked us to buy tickets and go to a golf tourney, we did it. Help spread the love. Certainly the local police chief is my list of friends to make when I move there. If you know what I mean. Maybe a bottle of JD, you know, for the effort, to help with future problems.

 

 

Whome else would you old guys recommend a meet and greet visit for a new guy?

- Mayor (in a smaller town)

- Barangay Captain or course

- Local Police guy, and if there is a special task force perhaps him too

- Local tourism chief

- Hospital director, see if their is any charity work going on

Edited by OldSchool
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gotta love you guys ..spent two weeks in the pi and some time in cebu not too long ago.. getting to know the place and no one even said hello or noticed...maybe your mentor should have concentrated on incomprehensable reading comprehension :wt-hell: ...its a gift a puzzle a little nuzzle the zees and cees are the keys to please...its almost xmas amigos...see yall soon..i got to see the poor boys new digs..youve got the cypher..with some sweat and a little fun ...its an easy 1000 to 1..way better than 46...man its hard typing in these restraints..almost time for meds and oatmeal ..

:)

Your riffs remind me a little of what I learned from my first professional mentor who trained me psychotherapy for schizophrenia. It drew me into the shrink business because I found they made perfect sense to me! And not to confuse schizophrenia with multiple personality ... different flavors entirely.

 

I suspect I am going to be enjoying your posts for a long time to come.

 

-Chris

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gotta love you guys ..spent two weeks in the pi and some time in cebu not too long ago.. getting to know the place and no one even said hello or noticed...maybe your mentor should have concentrated on incomprehensable reading comprehension :) ...its a gift a puzzle a little nuzzle the zees and cees are the keys to please...its almost xmas amigos...see yall soon..i got to see the poor boys new digs..youve got the cypher..with some sweat and a little fun ...its an easy 1000 to 1..way better than 46...man its hard typing in these restraints..almost time for meds and oatmeal ..

 

 

The Matrix (1999)

 

Morpheus: The pill you took is part of a trace program. It's designed to disrupt your input/output carrier signal so we can pinpoint your location.

 

Neo: What does that mean?

 

Cypher: It means fasten your seat belt Dorothy, 'cause Kansas is going bye-bye.

 

.

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